Opinion

Microsoft Working on Outlook Cloud Signatures

with 2 Comments by Tony Redmond

The news that Microsoft is working on cloud signatures for Outlook for Windows is welcome. The venerable Outlook client has long stored its signature information in the system registry, which makes it hard to move signatures from PC to PC. On the other hand, OWA stores its signatures in mailboxes, so the same signature is used no matter where you log in. Of course, OWA is a simpler client (no profiles, for instance), but it should be eminently possible to store everything Outlook needs in the cloud. At least for Outlook clients connected to Exchange Online...

Teams Certificate Outage Causes Office 365 Tenants Concern

by Tony Redmond

The fact that the Teams outage on 3 February was caused by an expired authentication certificate is enough to cause Office 365 tenants to ask why such a thing happened. Teams is built on top of a lot of Office 365 and Azure components, so it's not altogether surprising that issues happen in what is a very complex infrastructure spread around the world. But given Microsoft's hyped focus on DevOps, you would have thought that something as fundamental as an expired certificate would have been picked up and fixed before it caused customer disruption.

Google Is Building a Slack, Not a Teams

with 2 Comments by Brad Sams

For the past half-decade or so, Google has been trying feverishly to crack the enterprise market with its cloud and productivity application. While the company has made some serious in-roads, with its cloud services growing and the adoption of its productivity suite, Google Apps, often becoming the preferred choice for small companies, Microsoft still rules the roost for the productivity market.

Microsoft Closes Outlook Copy-On-Write Flaw with Exchange Online Fix

by Tony Redmond

Microsoft fixed the copy-on-write bug in Outlook for Windows in Exchange Online. The fix stops users removing attachments from sent or received messages. A strong case can be made that the fix should have been present from the start to stop any possibility that clients could comprise Exchange Native Data Protection. Microsoft doesn't think many people were affected and they could be right, but that doesn't make the problem any easier to swallow.

Petri Newsletter Sign-up
Tech Tuesday

Subscribe to Tech Tuesday, the latest insights from Petri.com for IT Pros.

    See All Petri Newsletters

    The Need to Manage Office 365 Feature Deprecations

    by Tony Redmond

    Everyone gets very excited about new Office 365 features, but how do we handle the dark side of change - deprecated features and functionality? The answer is that we probably don't do such a good job of managing features out of tenants. Maybe it's not the most exciting topic or work to do, but the simple fact is that deprecations happen and will continue to happen.

    Office 365 Successes and Failures Since 2011

    by Tony Redmond

    Office 365 has experienced great success since its launch in June 2011, but it's also had its share of failures as well. This article considers the most important technical advances in Office 365 and the most important parts of the ecosystem as well as some places where things didn't go quite so well as either Microsoft or tenants would have liked.

    Office 365 Has Changed Enormously Since 2011

    with 3 Comments by Tony Redmond

    Microsoft launched Office 365 in June 2011. Since then, the cloud office suite has matured nicely and now serves over 200 million monthly active users. Looking back as we enter a new decade, the fears that people had about going to the cloud have been dealt with and the Office 365 record of cost, reliability, and security holds up to close examination.

    Analyzing the 2019 Numbers for Different Office 365 Workloads

    by Tony Redmond

    Microsoft is notoriously careful at giving out usage numbers for different Office 365 workloads.We know what the overall count is and now we have numbers for SharePoint Online and Teams. Some glances into a handy crystal ball and some inspired guesswork allows us to calculate likely numbers for Exchange Online, Yammer, and Planner and paint a more comprehensive picture of what's happening inside Office 365.

    Exploring the Office 365 Substrate

    by Tony Redmond

    The Office 365 Substrate is a poorly understood part of Microsoft's Cloud Office system. The substrate is a critical part of enabling services that run across different applications like Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, Teams, and so on. Functionality like search, information protection, data governance, and eDiscovery is a lot harder when you have multiple moving parts. The substrate gives cohesion and coherence to what could otherwise be a tangled mess.