Office 365 Groups

Excel with List of Office 365 Groups

Hiding Office 365 Groups Created by Teams from Exchange Clients

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Teams now hides the Office 365 Groups that it creates from Exchange clients (Outlook, OWA, and the mobile apps). That’s as it should be for groups created for new teams. If you want to hide groups created for older teams, you can run the Set-UnifiedGroup cmdlet, but that soon becomes boring when you might have hundreds of groups to process. PowerShell to the rescue once again.

The Evolution of Microsoft’s Collaboration Story for Office 365

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Since Office 365 appeared in 2011, Microsoft’s collaboration story has varied according to whatever technology is available. Originally based on Exchange and SharePoint, it’s gone through Yammer, Office 365 Groups, and now Teams. You’d be forgiven for being confused by the frequent changes in the strategy du jour. And now we have inner and outer loops to consider, at least according to Microsoft’s favorite collaboration slide. Here’s my take.

Group Soft-deleted Recovery

Monitoring the Removal of Office 365 Groups (and Teams)

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Owners of Office 365 Groups can delete groups if they want. Some don’t like this as it means that SharePoint site collections, teams, and plans are removed. The simple membership model used by Office 365 Groups is the cause, and while you cannot stop owners deleting their groups, you can take action to detect and recover deleted groups if necessary.

Teams Splash

Common Questions About Teams Guest Access

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Office 365 now supports external access to Teams for guests with any email address, a development that creates some questions in the minds of those who might want to add guests from non-Office 365 domains. In this article, I try and answer some common questions that you might have about guest access.

Teams Splash

Teams Now Supports Guest Users from Non-Office 365 Domains

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Six months after allowing users from other Office 365 domains to access Teams as guest users, Microsoft now supports access from any email address. You can now invite people to join teams from Gmail, Yahoo! Mail, Yandex, Outlook.com, or any other email system. The same basic Azure B2B collaboration flow is used to invite guests and redeem the invitations, so it should be a well-worn path for administrators at this stage.

Office 365 with Teams

Keeping an Eye on Small but Important Changes in Office 365

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A recent vacation meant that I didn’t spend as much time as usual monitoring changes inside Office 365. As it happened, lots of change occurred. The large stuff (major updates for Teams and Planner) has already been covered in detail, but many other small but important changes are now active inside Office 365. And, as always, it’s the small stuff that can trip you up. Here’s what I learned after a weekend of catching up…

Using the Office 365 Groups Naming Policy

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One of the premium features for Office 365 Groups is the ability to use a naming policy so that all groups (and Teams) have a compliant name. The policy is a nice-to-have feature if you are concerned about having a well-organized directory with all your groups gathered in the same place. The question is whether enough business value is gained from a naming policy to make it worthwhile.

Teams PowerShell

A Teams PowerShell Primer

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The Teams PowerShell module is flawed, but that does not mean that you cannot do work with it. Here’s a primer of the most important cmdlets, together with a link to a rather interesting approach to finding out what Office 365 Groups are team-enabled.

How Office 365 Groups Saved SharePoint Online

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Office 365 Groups have been very good for SharePoint Online. Because many apps use Groups, they also use SharePoint, even if they don’t know it. Teams, Planner, Yammer, StaffHub, Stream, and Groups in Outlook (or whatever the name is this week) all drive SharePoint usage. SharePoint Online is Office 365 document management, and that’s a good thing.

Microsoft Clarifies Premium Features for Office 365 Groups. Prepare to Spend More!

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A new Microsoft support article clarifies premium features used by Office 365 Groups that require premium licenses. While good to know when you have to pay extra, it is baffling why some of the features fall into the premium category and why so many licenses are needed. The solution is to buy the Enterprise Mobility and Security suite. Or just pay for the extra licenses.