Nonapeptide

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: First impressions of Windows 8? #317536

    Re: First impressions of Windows 8?

    wullieb1;257030 wrote:
    I still know of places using NT4 and Office 97.

    oknGM.gif

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: First impressions of Windows 8? #317535

    Re: First impressions of Windows 8?

    scurlaruntings;255369 wrote:
    Is that the new name for it? Used to be known as Market Place on Windows Mobile. Either way its high time MS started getting some decent apps and development on it.

    It’s technically called the “Windows Store” I think.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: First impressions of Windows 8? #317534

    Re: First impressions of Windows 8?

    scurlaruntings;255356 wrote:
    I have it running on my Iconia W500. Works like a charm and very impressed with the UI. Microsoft will be using the Metro UI right across the board for all their products including the upcoming release of Office/Outlook. That said im more interested to see what their ‘Market Place’ has developed into. As 2 years ago or so on Windows Mobile 6 it was horrendous.

    I think the thing that I’m most interested in is seeing how the Windows “App Store” turns out. It’s about time they moved in that direction.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Windows Server 8 #317532

    Re: Windows Server 8

    At least there is much better options to run Windows without Explorer. It’s damn time that Windows Server were able to run headless. Server Core was a step in the right direction. If I never see Explorer on a server again it will still be too soon.

    As you can see, I’ve had my responsibilities moved to largely tending *NIX boxxen from a shell. And loving it. =P

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: First impressions of Windows 8? #317531

    Re: First impressions of Windows 8?

    I am determined, with the steely fire of a thousand Honey Badgers, to learn Windows 8 inside and out…

    …if for no other reason than to be able to intelligently ridicule it.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: New members, wanna say hi? (Archive #19) #317530

    Re: New members, wanna say hi? ~~POST HERE~~

    gigabyte;251759 wrote:
    Gigabyte signing in for the first time, I am grateful to have found this forum it has been a very interesting read, and I have barely scratched the surface.

    About myself, lets see, I am an OLD FART, and feeling older every day, I do not have any current certifications, my expertise is all on the job. I do not consider myself an expert by any means but I am quite knowledgable with PC based systems, and the main stream MS operating systems. I have been involved in IT work for almost 30 years so I have followed much of the development of the hardware and software in general use. I actually cut my teeth with CPM if anyone remembers that OS from the early 80’s – see I told you I have been around.

    I currently support approx 50 business users and maintain a dozen servers and all of the associated printers, mobile devices, network infrastructure, and deal with the “Stupid User Tricks” – they never stop amazing me in how they can mess up a perfectly good laptop so bad in so short a time.

    I am also late deafened and use a Cochlear Implant (a VERY AMAZING piece of technology) to help me hear, without that I would not be able to function porperly in my job and continue with the career I really love. I am very active in supporting Candidates of Implants and my IT background and experience has helped with that very much, I can truly say I have a computer Implanted in my head, I am not the 6 million Dollar Man, by any means.

    I do travel a great deal in my job so accessing forums is not always possible, but I hope to check in as often as I can and if possible assist with some of my expereince from my time in the trenches.

    Mike “Ears Hopin” P

    Quite a compelling story! Nice to have you here. SMB environments can often supply you with more challenge than the biggest enterprises in the world. =)

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    Nonapeptide
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    Re: Possible to P2V a slaved drive that used to hold an operating system?

    L4ndy;251476 wrote:
    Wheather it’s an offline or online process you’d still need an agent in there to complete the p2v.

    Hmm, so far in my research, offline P2V hasn’t needed an agent.

    L4ndy;251476 wrote:
    With a bit of luck http://www.mondorescue.org/ might be able to help. It also does a p2v as well.

    Oooo, new tool! Thanks! I’ll look into this.

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    Nonapeptide
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    Re: Possible to P2V a slaved drive that used to hold an operating system?

    scott28tt;251412 wrote:
    You’re right, it’s a X2X backup/restore tool and as such is designed as a preventative measure. It’s a decent solution to provide ongoing system protection, hence why I suggested it as something for you or your customers to deploy to avoid repeats of the problem you face at the moment.

    Scott.

    Pre-emptive design? Preventive measures? What witchery is this you speak of?! :twisted:

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    Nonapeptide
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    Re: Possible to P2V a slaved drive that used to hold an operating system?

    scott28tt;251342 wrote:
    This product can perform a scheduled P2V to give you a “virtual backup” of a physical box, and can also restore back to bare metal.

    http://www.novell.com/products/protect/

    Scott.

    True, true. All well and good. However, I suspect it’s not designed for offline P2V operations in the case of a server that can no longer boot for one reason or another.

    akitafan;251362 wrote:
    This is only a theory…

    1 – Mount it as a slave drive.
    2. Use imagex to create a wim of the drive.
    3. Use the wim2vhd tool from WinPE for Windows 7 to convert the wim to a vhd file.
    4. From there you can convert it to a VMK with winimage.

    Well, I wouldn’t be against using Hyper-V to let the server live in, actually. I deal with a lot of Microsoft customers, so that wouldn’t be so bad if I needed to restore a failed computer in this manner. Veddy interestink. I hadn’t considered this mostly because I wasn’t familiar with the existence of wim2vhd. =)

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    Nonapeptide
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    Re: Possible to P2V a slaved drive that used to hold an operating system?

    Dumber;251301 wrote:
    You aren’t using vCenter server?
    There is also a stand alone converter which copies the entire running system or just selected disks
    http://michael.requeny.com/2011/09/03/vmware-vcenter-converter-standalone-5-0-released/

    Else dd is I think the only option… don’t forget to remove the old kernel drivers and install the VMware tools.

    No, this is just for informal disaster recovery for small clients. If they need a server up quickly, but don’t have hardware yet, I might be able to virtualize it. At least, that was the theory anyway. =)

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    Nonapeptide
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    Re: Possible to P2V a slaved drive that used to hold an operating system?

    Dumber;251269 wrote:

    Sadly, the Petri article relies on the Enterprise Boot CD and one must be a current VirtualCenter Management Server customer or P2V Assistant customer.

    Yeah, maybe one could spin up a VM, boot the VM into damn small linux, connect the dead server’s drive and mount it before dd’ing it into the VM.

    For some reason I thought this would be a simpler process. Is it so uncommon to want to revive a dead physical server as a virtual instance?

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Malware Question #317524

    Re: Malware Question

    nharvey;251202 wrote:
    Thank you so much.

    Searched a couple things, and watched a couple youtubes about it,
    but maybe I’m a bit confused on something.

    How can I perform an offline virus scan on an infected pc, using a pxe server?

    *note: it doesn’t have to be open source, I just want the best option out there

    The PXE server would deliver an ISO that has a antivirus scanner in it. For example, get the Kaspersky boot CD ISO and configure the PXE server to deliver it to clients that boot from their PXE NICs. Of course, this is all predicated on clients actually having PXE NICs, which is fairly common these days.

    Instead of rolling your own, look into FOG. It’s friendly to use and abstracts away the scary Debian underguts of the whole operation. =)

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Malware Question #317523

    Re: Malware Question

    nharvey;251112 wrote:
    The problem is that with so many computers, preforming an offline scan isn’t feasible.

    Perhaps you might want to create a portable PXE “Server” in the form of a laptop that you can bring to clients and then boot up multiple PCs simultaneously into an offline scan. I don’t think it’s an option. You must do it or you must reimage.

    nharvey;251112 wrote:
    third party wise, what’s making the most waves out there these days?

    I am of the opinion that Kaspersky is one of the best products out there. I use it most of the time when I need an offline scan.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Malware Question #317522

    Re: Malware Question

    My suggestion is to use bootable CDs that will scrape the offending PC as clean as is practically possible. I perfer Kaspersky’s boot CD. Make sure to mind the licensing stipulations as many CDs are free for personal use but not for business use.

    Having said that, realize that any PC that is compromised can never be fully trusted again. The goal for A/V products is to prevent the infection in the first place. If you’re finding that infections are unavoidable and also frequent, the ultimate problem is one of user education. However, if users cannot be educated to avoid infections, then the next step is to remove administrator rights. Without admin rights, infections are stopped in their tracks.

    It’s possible to automate the offline, image-based scan of PCs if you use a tool like FOG for your Windows PCs. You can schedule a reboot into a PXE server which will, based on PC MAC address, feed a A/V scan image into memory and perform a scan.

    To address your specific concern about IE redirects, I’d suggest the following:

    1. Boot into a [A/V vendor of choice] CD and perform an offline scan
    2. Reset IE back to defaults. If the version of IE is pre-version-8 then uipdate them to 8 or 9 depending on their OS.
    3. Check localhosts file and remove all sketchy entries
    4. If all else fails, burninate and rebuild.
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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: SBS 2003 to SBS 2003 Migration #317521

    Re: SBS 2003 to SBS 2003 Migration

    I could type up a few pages of text, but the thoughtful folks in Redmond did it for me!

    Migrating Windows Small Business Server 2003 to New Hardware

    That should give you a huge leg up on the whole process. After scouring that whole page, come back with any clarifying issues that you might have.

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    Nonapeptide
    Member
    in reply to: Network printer problem on one computer #317520

    Re: Network printer problem on one computer

    Time to try ye olden TCP/IP stack reset.

    netsh int ip reset c:resetlog.txt[/CODE]

    Sometimes the TCP/IP stack gets all cocked up and needs a good beating.[CODE]netsh int ip reset c:resetlog.txt[/CODE]

    Sometimes the TCP/IP stack gets all cocked up and needs a good beating.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Running program in compatibility mode + run as administrator #317515

    Re: Running program in compatibility mode + run as administrator

    I think what you’re looking for is modifying the permissions on the WindowsTasks folder as well as the tasks within that folder. Grant the users the proper permissions for them to run tasks (execute permissions I think – you might want to turn on access auditing on the folder and see what’s being allowed and denied just to make sure). So in other words, you’ve got to cacl your acls. An odd coincidence after our brief conversation this afternoon. :D

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Host My Own Mail Server Through Exchange server 2007 #317514

    Re: Host My Own Mail Server Through Exchange server 2007

    erick;248626 wrote:
    sorry my english is bad !
    i have a suitable server for microsoft exchange 2007 and a public ip and public domain.
    i want to host my own mail server Through exchange server 2007 sp3 but i dont know What should I do for this
    my domain handler has set an a record and a MX record to my public ip and my public ip is set to mikrotik router board .
    now i dont know what is microsoft exchange configuration for this scenario
    how i can use “[email protected] ” in exchange and set it to outlook out of my office by internet mail
    please help me !

    Setting up Exchange, in any configuration, is well beyond the scope of posts on a forum. Entire books have been written about setting up just one of the roles within Exchange, much less the entire beast.

    If you must do it yourself, you’re in for an exciting but exhausting journey. I would recommend getting some Video training (Train Signal or CBT Nuggets are good) and some good books.

    To be more specific, however, you may want to look into Microsoft Small Business Server. I’m not sure if you already have a domain set up or not – or even if you specifically need one. Setting up Exchange in SBS is considerably easier than building an Exchange server from scratch.

    Keep in mind that Exchange needs to exist in an Active directory domain. Also it is not recommended to put Exchange on a domain controller. Furthermore, it’s strongly advised to have two domain controllers. So now you’re talking about three servers at a minimum just to cover your hindquarters. Then add a fourth server if you want to have a Edge Transport server handle anti-spam.

    If all you need is email, then consider one of the myriad other options that exist. You may be better of with hmail or Kerio connect.

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    Nonapeptide
    Member
    in reply to: New Wireless Network #317512

    Re: New Wireless Network

    Deland01;248518 wrote:
    Thanks for the advice guys, I went with the Cisco AP’s, bought x3. My boss told me he now wants to have the wireless network in the internet Cafe as well. Can anyone give me any advise on the security of doing this?

    We currently have a heavily locked down Citrix environment for internet Cafe use which dis allows access to the rest of the network so no one can remove any files or mess teh network up.

    My plan was to set one router up, use the other as a repeater for the office wireless. Then set the remaining router up on its own network segment for the internet cafe.

    Can anyone suggest any other ways or if this might cause any security concerns?

    I’m slightly confused about the internet cafe. When you mention that Citrix is involved with it, do you mean that you provide computers for people to work on and those computers run some kind of session on a Citrix server? So that means that you already have a wired network in the cafe that PCs are connected to? But now you want to allow people with mobile devices to connect?

    Lots more information is needed to make an informed suggestion. However, here’s goes with my uninformed suggestions:

    You will be able to have multiple wireless networks on the same WAP. You can segregate the different SSIDs on different VLANs and then handle the segregation of the network traffic through your normal means (VLANs on your switches and rules on your firewall, etc.). There’s no need to dedicate a WAP to the public network. Also, look into peer security on the wireless access point. I’m not sure What Cisco calls it, but there is often a feature that disallows all nodes from sending and receiving traffic from eachother but only to gateways and other authorized devices.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: New members, wanna say hi? (Archive #19) #317510

    Re: New members, wanna say hi? ~~POST HERE~~

    slvfox;248344 wrote:
    I have been in IT since before most of you were born I suspect and am primarily doing web site development and design at this stage of my career.

    Go Cardinal! Go Bucks!

    I dunno… we’ve got some ooooooldsters on the board. =) Welcome aboard. Say hello to fellow Ohioan Joe Qwerty. I lived in Cinci for 5 years, but that’s an experience I’m trying to black out. So, so cold…

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    Nonapeptide
    Member
    in reply to: New members, wanna say hi? (Archive #19) #317509

    Re: New members, wanna say hi? ~~POST HERE~~

    CNBarnes;248236 wrote:
    Newbie to this forum… .

    I have done IT work since 1988, the first 10 years being in Help Desk support. Since that time, I have done System Admin – virtually all of it on the Linux side. In August I took a new position w/ an organization that is 100% MS.

    Oh goody – lots of new things to learn! :-P

    Great to have you out of the help desk and into these forums. =)

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    Nonapeptide
    Member
    in reply to: after power failure win7 does not connect to network #317508

    Re: after power failure win7 does not connect to network

    lvaibhavt;248248 wrote:
    I connect to my desktop remotely and this issue halts my work. Any suggestions why this happens?

    First, I’m unclear if the power is going out for your PCs as well as your modem? It sounds like it’s only the modem that is powering off but the laptop and desktop are staying on. Because otherwise how is the desktop being turned back on again automatically? Is it on some kind of smart PDU?

    Check your event log for errors relating to network services. It will probably be in the System log. It could be that somehow or another your installation of Windows is a bit dodgy and the networking services aren’t restarting properly.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Affordable and simple NAS or SAN #317506

    Re: Affordable and simple NAS or SAN

    Wofen;248174 wrote:
    Personally, I would not be buying any Hard drives at the moment with the prices what they are (I have seen 500% price increases latly).

    Wait 2-3 months and the prices will be drasticlly lower.

    A lot of the price hikes are centered on Western Digital as much of their manufacturing is Thailand based and Thailand has had some natural disasters that shut down production lines. Samsung and Hitachi are largely unaffected from what I know. Which is awesome since Spinpoints and Deskstars are pretty darn good consumer-level drives. A stack of F1s on a FreeNAS box ain’t bad at all.

    Wofen;248174 wrote:
    Also, building our own is the cheapest way to get a good setup, as there are quite a few Linux Distros that will make great SAN/NAS setups, and then when you want to expand its just a hard drvie, and possible a RAID card, rather then a whole new encloser.

    Thumbs up. Although for a self-made unified storage box, I’d avoid a RAID card and rely on the filer’s soft RAID – especially if lower RPM drives are used or ones that have energy saving circuitry. The only “detriment” is that the CPU will be used for parity calculations but virtually any CPU that was made in the last five years will yawn at most workloads that a small office of less than 50 would put it through.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: New Wireless Network #317504

    Re: New Wireless Network

    For the love of all that is properly engineered and consistently managed, please do not use consumer wireless access points. No, DD-WRT or Tomato will not make you happy either. I’ve been there and tried to implement wireless networks with DD-WRT. It is a maze of twisty passages all alike – and by “all alike” I mean “all made of lava and hypodermic needles lusting to collapse on you”. DD-WRT’s documentation is in the form of a wiki that is one part lore, one part mythology and one part basilar-type migraine. The firmware itself is spotty in its reliability – would you rely on something that has a feature called “Keep Alive” that is merely a scheduled reboot option?! Some features just don’t work like you would expect them to if you’re familiar with networking equipment that is actually manufactured to standards. If you log in via SSH you’re presented with the most unholy shell that was ever extruded from the intestines of Tartarus, AKA BusyBox. You never know which commands will have which features available. Just try and get ntpclient to do anything useful in DD-WRT’s BusyBox shell. I dare you, infidel!

    What you need is a legit, enterprise wireless network. It doesn’t have to me incredibly expensive or complex. You don’t necessarily need a wireless switch or dedicated appliance to manage it. What I would recommend is to look into SonicWall’s wireless offerings or if you want to maybe go a bit fancier look at Xirrus’s offerings. Xirrus builds the management station into their multi-antenna access points. You get heaps of bandwidth too. You don’t need to go bonkers with Aruba or Meru or Cisco or… any number of other products that are intended for a larger scale deployment. Look for a product that specifically focuses on the SMB market (SonicWall) or that really helps you out with built-in enterprise management (Xirrus).

    I should also say that designing a properly functioning, reliable and secure corporate wireless network isn’t exactly child’s play. It takes some decent understand of wave propagation, decibel math and local laws concerning frequency and channel useage. Take some time to research 802.11 and see what you’re in for. You can do it!

    If you decide to go with consumer or SOHO hardware, you’ll always be at a disadvantage, IMO and IME. If you choose to drop DD-WRT onto a WAP, no matter what image or iteration, you will be struck with a meteor in your sleep. Either that or you’ll spend the rest of your employment trying to mold DD-WRT into something usable. I’d take the meteor strike, personally.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: dns concerns #317503

    Re: dns concerns

    Wow, this sounds frighteningly like an issue I had two and a half years ago. I blogged about it on my old blog. Here’s my first post about it that was proven to be wrong. My second post explained the ultimate solution, however.

    It turned out that the gateway (a LinkSys RV082 – may it be tormented forever) was in some way delaying or mangling DNS requests that the server sent out. The server was in no way looking to the RV082 for any kind of guidance. There was no dependency chain that they gateway was a part of. It was merely passing packets. However, it just didn’t like the idea of keeping DNS traffic unmolested.

    I swapped the RV082 out for a SonicWall TZ180 and all was well. BTW, this wasn’t purely cargo-cult systems administration. I really did try to track down the exact problem. I created a ticket with Microsoft, had a tech work on the server with me, captured data streams, analyzed it… the whole nine yards.

    List out each device that puts its mits on your packets and then consider if it could be tampering with it in some way. Likely it’s a gateway device; router or modem.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: SBS Backup #317501

    Re: SBS Backup

    roswald72;248091 wrote:
    I’d like to get a removable drive bay and swap them like the way we used to swap 8 track tapes, just like a big SATA cartridge.

    Can anyone tell me how to tell the current “percentage full” on the backup hard drive?

    This is exactly what I do with an SBS 2008 instance. The office swaps out backups drives once a week. If you go into the Backup and Restore Utility you’ll be able to see how much space is left on the drive. You’re right, you can’t browse the drive in any way.

    You should also be able to restore files that were backed up on the SBS 2011 machine onto a different PC. Attach the backup drive, go to the backup and restore utility and then select to restore files. It should scan for attached drives that hold backups. You can then peruse the backup drive for files to restore. The backup wouldn’t be useful at all if files couldn’t be restored on a different PC. Just make sure that you don’t backup another PC to the same backup drive as the SBS 2011 one.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: New members, wanna say hi? (Archive #19) #317500

    Re: new guy on the block

    EDIT: No idea why decided to welcome two month old “newcomers.” Looks like I need to tweak how threads are seen on my latest installation. Oh well, always nice to say “hi!” to people anyway…

    LA1;245723 wrote:
    Hello everyone. I have worked in the IT enviroment since the mid 80’s. I now work in the IT dept of a Government contractor.

    Mid 80s IT! Why, back then everything was still centralized and managed from large collections of aggregated computing power. That’s just craz… wait… wut.

    navster235;245699 wrote:
    I am new to AD / Exchange Scripting and have so far written a few scripts to automate some AD / Exchange tasks.

    I am intrigued and want to learn more about scripting / databases / SQL

    I have only one thing to say to you:

    PS C:> get-help *[/CODE][CODE]PS C:> get-help *[/CODE]

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Affordable and simple NAS or SAN #317499

    Re: Affordable and simple NAS or SAN

    xAOx;248073 wrote:
    Hi all, I’m looking for a 1TB or more network hard drive that will function as my file repository. Not sure what the difference is between NAS or SAN as it seems interchangeable but I need 10 users to access the files from the network drive as a mapped drive on their workstations. Think file server minus the server stuff. Any suggestions?

    Thank you in advance.

    First, the distinction between NAS and SAN is being blurred with devices and software that allows for block and file level access on the same unit. It’s called “Unified Storage.” Traditionally, SAN’s referred to block level storage as well as a dedicated backend network that only serviced storage traffic. Nowadays with unified storage boxes, you get block (iSCSI for example) and file (NFS and CIFS for example) level storage on one unit. Small shops are tempted to put it on the same data network as users… and often do.

    I am biased as I do not trust low end all-in-one NAS boxes. Usually it’s a matter of quality control as well as crappy management software. I would much prefer to build my own. I strongly recommend OpenFiler as the filer OS. It is built on BSD and uses ZFS as the underlying file system. It uses softraid which seems to do better with low power drives that have timeout circuitry. Any box with an i3 or better will yawn at the parity workload.

    Grab some Western Digital Green drives, toss three or four in a case and drop OpenFiler on it. You’ll then have the ability to provision block and file level chunks of storage. If you need Active directory integration, I’d just as soon carve out an iSCSI LUN from the box and then present it to users via a Windows Server. Much fun is to be had.

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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Unable to boot Server 2003 #317496

    Re: Unable to boot Server 2003

    Sasman;247930 wrote:
    I have purchased a HP Proliant Server from a friend who works in i.t.
    The machine used to belong to a small company. Its still setup with their domain details. I have been unable to make my laptop part of the domain.
    I want to start again as I have a server 2003 disk but I just cant get the server to boot from the dvd as I cant get into the Bios
    I have tried pressing F1 F8 del etc. but with no joy.

    Any suggestions greatly appreciated

    Thanks
    Sas.

    AFAIK, ProLiant servers usually use F10 as their BIOS key. Or perhaps that’s only post-Compaq ProLiants.

    • Are you using a USB keyboard? I’ve had sad times when USB devices were not recognized like they should have been at POST. Can you try a PS/2 keyboard? It’s embarrassing, but I like to keep at least one or two of those old things around for just such an occasion.
    • You can also open up the old soldier and search for the CMOS reset button. It might also be a reset jumper rather than button. Give it a good ten second press while the server is powered off and completely unhooked from a power source
    • Re-seat all of your RAM just for good measure. Take it out, blow it off, put it back in. Grounding yourself first would be a happy thing.
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    Nonapeptide
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    in reply to: Remotely Uninstall Applications #317494

    Re: Remotely Uninstall Applications

    In my experience, Active Directory only uninstalls applications as good as the uninstaller was written… and sometimes worse. Registry keys, data files, application folders and various gremlins remain to be found when you least expect it and are most likely to be in a hurry.

    Taking away installation privs is never fun for the user base, so make sure that there’s a good application distribution system in place. AD itself is okay… but a bit inflexible at times. You might be interested in SCCM to make application deployment easier and more reliable.

    Back to your uninstallation question: Uninstalling applications that were not first deployed with AD is not fun. You’ll probably want to create a reference machine and load the application that you want to uninstall. Then take a snapshot with the MSI creator of your choice. Then uninstall the application and take another snapshot. Create an MSI and deploy it. That’s a bit messy… nay, that’s a game of tag with molitov cocktails… if you have many different types of OSs at various stages of patching.

    Plan B: Nuke everything from orbit. Start from scratch. :D

Viewing 30 posts - 1 through 30 (of 1,434 total)