Wiring Up Home A Network Socket

Home Forums Networking General Networking Wiring Up Home A Network Socket

This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Hirsch 11 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts

  • Kyuuketsuki
    Participant
    #167363

    OK,

    So, at home, I have a couple of double network sockets … cheap things but they work.

    In my attic I wired one up and, having only one wire in, figured I could simply run wires from one socket to the other (duplicate configuration i.e. port 1 connected to port 1, 2 to 2 etc.) and so provide two working sockets. Each socket works AOK but clearly I’ve done something wrong since both won’t work at the same time so either I need to do some kind of in-socket-crossover or I need two wires in.

    Can anyone advise me on this?

    Thx

    Keke

    Blood
    Blood
    Moderator
    #337350

    I’m having trouble visualising this. Do you have a photo/diagram showing what you have done?


    Hirsch
    Member
    #391446

    Sounds like they are wired in series just like the power cables. If I am correct, this doesn’t work like 10Base2. You need to have a cable from the switch to each point. Each socket will work as long as there is only one patch lead connected at a time. Run a second cable and then maybe you might need a new RJ45 socket since the connectors that you punch the wires into may have been spread a little due to having a second wire punched down into it. It could make for a flaky connection.


    Kyuuketsuki
    Participant
    #312536
    JJKing;n515605 wrote:
    Sounds like they are wired in series just like the power cables. If I am correct, this doesn’t work like 10Base2. You need to have a cable from the switch to each point. Each socket will work as long as there is only one patch lead connected at a time. Run a second cable and then maybe you might need a new RJ45 socket since the connectors that you punch the wires into may have been spread a little due to having a second wire punched down into it. It could make for a flaky connection.

    I guess each pin is in series i.e. 1 connected to 1, 2 to 2 etc. … I had assumed it would therefore work just like a hub. Maybe I have to somehow do a crossover and, if so, I’m asking what pins should be connected to what other pins?

    Keke


    Ossian
    Moderator
    #191903

    Ethernet doesn’t work that way, unfortunately. You will need to have a separate cable (all 8 wires) from each socket back to your switch.
    The best you could do with your setup is an “either – or” where only one socket can be active at a time


    Anonymous
    #372082

    If you’re trying to drive 2 ethernet devices from a single socket, it is do-able, but not the way you’ve done it. You can drive 2 ethernet devices through a single cable through the walls, but only at a max of 100Mbps (Fast Ethernet) per device. Each ethernet cable has 8 wires, but in Ethernet (10Mbps) or FastEthernet (100Mbps) speeds, only 4 wires are physically used. That means the cable through the wall can carry 2 separate channels of data simultaneously, but as I said, only up to Fast Ethernet. GigabitEthernet (1000Mbps) uses all 8 wires for 1 channel so can’t be split. The way you do this is with a pair of ethernet splitters.

    If you search for ‘ethernet splitter’ on :google:, you’ll find them available lots of places, and they’re not expensive. Plug one of these splitters into each end of the existing trunk cable, and then plug 2 switch ports from your router into the 2 splitter sockets on that end of the trunk, and now you can drive 2 devices at 100Mbps at the other end. If you want Gig speeds, you’ll have to look to other solutions.


    Kyuuketsuki
    Participant
    #312537
    Ossian;n515618 wrote:
    Ethernet doesn’t work that way, unfortunately. You will need to have a separate cable (all 8 wires) from each socket back to your switch.
    The best you could do with your setup is an “either – or” where only one socket can be active at a time

    Which is what I have … OK :)

    Keke


    Kyuuketsuki
    Participant
    #312538
    RicklesP;n515621 wrote:
    If you search for ‘ethernet splitter’ on :google:, you’ll find them available lots of places, and they’re not expensive. Plug one of these splitters into each end of the existing trunk cable, and then plug 2 switch ports from your router into the 2 splitter sockets on that end of the trunk, and now you can drive 2 devices at 100Mbps at the other end. If you want Gig speeds, you’ll have to look to other solutions.

    OK … thanks for that :)

    Keke

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.