The best way to connect switches in the network?

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    Svenster
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    #157253

    I’ve got some basic network question. My network is devided over 2 floors, wich are connected through a fiber backbone. On both floors I have 3 Cisco Catalyst 2960G switches. These switches contain fiber ports.

    What is the best way to connect these switches? On each floor, connect the first switch to the fiber backbone. Connect the third switch to the second, and the second to the first…. all with fiber? Or is there a better way to get optimal performance?

    Is it a smart thing to configure my fileserver and SharePoint server with two NICs…. Connect 1 NIC to a switch on the first floor, and the other NIC directly on the backbone (UTP) to the second floor? Or is that not gonna work?

    Any advise is welcome here!

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    L4ndy
    Member
    #277077

    Re: The best way to connect switches in the network?

    I would connect each switch to the backbone and then each device to the appropriate switch. For servers you could also use Teaming for extra link redundancy.
    I wouldn’t daisychain the switches as it increases the point of failure.

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    Anonymous
    #372822

    Re: The best way to connect switches in the network?

    The optimal solution would be to have 3560’s or 3750’s at your distribution layer and connect those via fiber to both floors. Then etherchannel from the 2960’s to the core.

    Since all you have is 2960G’s (dont think they support flex stack 2960S’s do) Then connect your fiber to one of your 2960’s on each floor (make this switch your “core”) Then have multiple uplinks from the other “access” layer switches to your core 2960. You definately want redundant links “etherchannel” between each “access” switch to the core. So if you use a standard 2 port etherchannel you will loose 2 ports on each switch for the uplink and 2 ports on the core for each etherchannel.

    Not sure how many vlans you have but you can configure the “core” switch as spanning tree root for some vlans and the other “core” as root for the others.

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