Present Multiple DFS Shares In Network Folder

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 3 months, 1 week ago.

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  • shadragon
    Member
    #167652

    Good Day,

    On our 2016 file servers we have a series of DFS shares, one for each department. We want to list these DFS shares in a networked drive so users can click on them as required. So when you open that network drive you will see something like:

    Accounts (Goes to \domainDFSshare1)
    Sales (Goes to \domainDFSshare2)
    IT (Goes to \domainDFSshare3)
    Marketing (Goes to \domainDFSshare4)
    etc.

    All shares at this level will be visible to all users, but security on each share will only allow authorized folks in. We have users who require access to multiple shares so mapping one share per department will not do. This lets us host the DFS shares over multiple servers with flexibility to move things around without changing what the user sees.

    I can’t seem to find a way that will let me do this. Tried a shortcut which works on the server, but the W10 workstations do not see the UNC path.

    Any suggestions on how to accomplish this? Cheers.


    Ossian
    Moderator
    #192071

    How about mapping the DFS root? I’ve just tried it (Win 10 1803) and can see all the shares as shortcuts within it, and can access them.
    Of course I am assuming (ass-u-me) you have a single DFS root, and that you are very sure of your permissions!


    wullieb1
    Participant
    #245806

    This is actually pretty simple.

    Create your namespace, DFS Root Namespace, Create your namespace then add the folder target that you want.

    In your Example i would have the following

    \YOURDOMAINOffice as the Namespace

    Inside the DFS Name space you would then create the Accounts, Sales, IT, Marketing, etc. folders

    For each Namespace folder you create you then doubel click on it and add the reelvant target folder, \SERVERAccounts


    Blood
    Moderator
    #337407

    [noparse]I use a shared folder on a server that lists batch files that map each DFS folder to a drive – Map-accounts.bat etc. Everyone gets the same drive letter for the same DFS folder, all paths to those folders are consistent – which means all linked content is always available.
    Our domain is named htlincs.local so, a DFS share named accounts will always be mapped to drive L: using the following:

    @echo off
    net use L: “\htlincs.localAccounts” /persistent:yes

    If you shouldn’t have access to it, your (lack of) permissions prevent access. This works on all our clients – W7 and W10.[/noparse]


    Anonymous
    #369417
    Quote:
    How about mapping the DFS root? I’ve just tried it (Win 10 1803) and can see all the shares as shortcuts within it, and can access them.
    Of course I am assuming (ass-u-me) you have a single DFS root, and that you are very sure of your permissions!

    Hi Ossian.
    We have thirty other DFS folders and exposing the root will show them as well.

    Quote:
    I use a shared folder on a server that lists batch files that map each DFS folder to a drive – Map-accounts.bat etc. Everyone gets the same drive letter for the same DFS folder, all paths to those folders are consistent – which means all linked content is always available.
    Our domain is named htlincs.local so, a DFS share named accounts will always be mapped to drive L: using the following:

    Hi Blood. As I said in my OP, this will not work for me as we have multiple users who need access to multiple departments. It is what we have today and the files on that share are massive. We need to break it up into individual shares over multiple servers or we run out of space.
    Direction, from on high, has said they want all folders seen by all people with security restricting access.


    Blood
    Moderator
    #337408

    I don’t understand – we have, for example, a DFS folder under the root named Accounts, but under accounts are DFS links to all the shared folders that the Accounts team requires access to. Staff simply double-click the .bat files that they need access to. Projects, Admin, Database etc. And under Projects, for example, there are many sub-folders all directing to individually shared project data folders distributed across a couple of servers.

    How many folders do you have under your DFS root? Admittedly, we are a small charity, with 2.25TB of live data + more archived data, so our first level folders are probably fewer than you have, but altogether they still provide access to 1.3 million files.

    [Edit]
    Have you tried suggesting a better way of presenting the data rather than providing access to a gazillion DFS shares?


    Ossian
    Moderator
    #192073
    shadragon;n517832 wrote:
    Hi Ossian.
    We have thirty other DFS folders and exposing the root will show them as well.
    .

    OK, you didn’t mention that in your original post, and clearly my psychic IT-Admin powers are on the blink.

    You can have multiple DFS roots if you want, allowing you to choose which you expose to the users

    Alternatively, have you looked at conditional targeting of Group Policy Preferences to expose the correct set of mapped drives?


    Anonymous
    #369418

    OK, I sorted it out. Was not as difficult as I thought, but I’d made a silly permissions error and that was causing me grief.

    What you do is set up your shared drive as needed then in the folders create shortcuts to the DFS shares and call the shortcuts whatever you want. When someone clicks on them, it takes them to the \Domainsharedirectory automatically and puts that path in the Windows Explorer header. You can set up as many as you like in the folder and you’re off to the races.

    Thanks everyone.


    wullieb1
    Participant
    #245807
    shadragon;n517837 wrote:
    OK, I sorted it out. Was not as difficult as I thought, but I’d made a silly permissions error and that was causing me grief.

    What you do is set up your shared drive as needed then in the folders create shortcuts to the DFS shares and call the shortcuts whatever you want. When someone clicks on them, it takes them to the \Domainsharedirectory automatically and puts that path in the Windows Explorer header. You can set up as many as you like in the folder and you’re off to the races.

    Thanks everyone.

    Isn’t that pretty much what i said??

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