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Comments Requested - Resource Pools as a Means of Organizing

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  • Comments Requested - Resource Pools as a Means of Organizing

    I work as part of a team supporting a VmWare environment. The environment consists of several clusters across approximately 12 pretty beefy blades. This environment supports a total of approximately 200 virtual machines.

    It has become common practice to create resource pools with default settings to organize servers by purpose.

    All servers in the Production Cluster, for instance, are a member of 1 of 13 resource pools. No servers run outside a pool. The number of members within a resouce pool range from 1 to 40.

    Again, the resource pools are used for organization only, no configuration is being done on the pool.

    I have done reading on this topic and I am fairly certain this has a huge negative impact on our virtual environment. I have worked within the VMware environment for several years. I know my way around VMWare but I am no expert by any means. I need concrete information to 1.) Learn that I am wrong and leave it alone, or 2) To support my argeument to stop this practice.

    Thank you in advance for your comments.

  • #2
    Re: Comments Requested - Resource Pools as a Means of Organizing

    That doesn't sound like a good reason to create Resource Pools. I get the desire to organize things and it's too bad you can only create folders at the Datacenter level and not the host level, but still... that sounds like the wrong way to go about organizing things. A Resource Pool is meant to allocate, control, and apply physical resource parameters to a set of guests, not as a means of applying a logical construct for the purpose of "organizing" guests based on function.

    I wish I could suggest another option for you, but I don't know of another one.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Comments Requested - Resource Pools as a Means of Organizing

      Using resource pool to organize vm's is a bad practice.
      Please review this as an example. Frank Denneman is an expert on DRS.
      http://frankdenneman.nl/2010/09/reso...eous-vmotions/
      And from Eric Sloof, a VMware trainer and presenter...
      http://www.ntpro.nl/blog/archives/15...dangerous.html
      Marcel
      Technical Consultant
      Netherlands
      http://www.phetios.com
      http://blog.nessus.nl

      MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
      "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

      "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
      "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

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      • #4
        Re: Comments Requested - Resource Pools as a Means of Organizing

        Using resource pools like folders is a bad idea. It fundamentally changes the way that CPU and memory shares work, and if you don't configure reservations and limits then shares are the only resource control mechanism in play. A much better practice is to create an equivalent folder structure in the VMs & Templates inventory view.
        VCP2 / VCP3 / VCP4 / VCP 5 / VCAP-DCA4 / VCI / vExpert 2010-2012

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        • #5
          Re: Comments Requested - Resource Pools as a Means of Organizing

          The two articles mentioned are the reason for my post.

          I was hoping a reader might respond with some first hand experience with this situation.

          I moved my 35 Xenapp servers outside of a Resource Pool and have not had a single unexplained alarm or failure. Prior to moving these servers I would experience multiple server failures per week.

          I no longer have doubt that what we are doing with resource pools has a negative impact on our environment. Again, what I am looking for is others with specific experience in this area.

          Comment

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