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  • TEST LAB - Setup- Internet Access

    Hi

    I wish to have to configure a Test Lab that can still connect to the internet from the PC's servers within - the Petri article How to Create a Network Test Lab using VMWARE - works OK until you wish to conenct to the internet.

    I have a number of servers setup in my test setup

    What is the best way to give the Test Lab internet access from within.

    Thanks for any help

  • #2
    Re: TEST LAB - Setup- Internet Access

    Can you sketch me a quick network diagram to show me what you have right now (or describe in detail your network along with IP addresses)? The more information I have up front, the quicker I can help you.
    VCDX3 #34, VCDX4, VCDX5, VCAP4-DCA #14, VCAP4-DCD #35, VCAP5-DCD, VCPx4, vEXPERTx4, MCSEx3, MCSAx2, MCP, CCAx2, A+
    boche.net - VMware Virtualization Evangelist
    My advice has no warranties. Follow at your own risk.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: TEST LAB - Setup- Internet Access

      Hi

      The physical server on our local network is on 10.0.245.2
      The virtual servers are on 10.0.10.0 one of which is a DNS & DHCP server 10.0.10.3.
      Our router and default gateway is on 10.0.245.1 for both the physical and test lab.

      We wished to create a test lab that didn't impinge on our local network and followed the Petri knowledgebase article to create a test lab which involves removing all bridged ethernet adaptors(VMnet0) and changing to host only (VMnet1). This gives us a test lab setup but no interenet access.

      Putting the default gateway to 10.0.245.1 on our test lab servers didn't help.

      I would think there should be an elegant way of giving internet access without impinging on our local network and any suggestions would be appreciated.

      Thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: TEST LAB - Setup- Internet Access

        and changing to host only (VMnet1). This gives us a test lab setup but no interenet access.
        If you use host only networks, then you will not go outside of your local machine.

        For that you will either need to use NAT or bridged mode
        Maish
        ----------------------------------------------------------
        Technodrone|@maishsk|Author of VMware vSphere Design
        VMware vExpert 2013-2010,VCAP5-DCA/DCD,VCP
        MSCA 2000/2003, MCSE 2000/2003
        A proud husband and father of 3 girls
        ----------------------------------------------------------
        If you find the information useful please don't forget to give reputation points sigpic.

        Have a good one!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: TEST LAB - Setup- Internet Access

          Your VMs need a route to the 10.0.245.0 subnet to gain internet access.

          You can accomplish this in one of a few ways:

          1. Place a router between your 10.0.245.0 and 10.0.10.0 subnets and supply the default gateway for the VMs of 10.0.245.1. This is what I do in my labs. I prefer this method although it's a little more complex (but more fun right?). Build a Windows Server 2003 VM software router using Routing and Remote Access and enable RIPv2 on both the VM router as well as the hardware router you already have at the .1 address. This will allow routing to the internet to occur naturally without having to manually edit the routing tables for each of the machines on the 10.0.10.0 subnet.

          2. Multihome each of your VMs adding a 2nd virtual NIC on the 10.0.245.0 subnet and supply the default gateway for the VMs of 10.0.245.1.
          VCDX3 #34, VCDX4, VCDX5, VCAP4-DCA #14, VCAP4-DCD #35, VCAP5-DCD, VCPx4, vEXPERTx4, MCSEx3, MCSAx2, MCP, CCAx2, A+
          boche.net - VMware Virtualization Evangelist
          My advice has no warranties. Follow at your own risk.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: TEST LAB - Setup- Internet Access

            Thank you for the information:-

            I would like to try both to see which is best and have had a first shot at each:-

            On the first I have never used RRAS before - can you explain in a little more detail please :-

            1)Can I run RRAS on one of my current servers or does it need a server of its own
            2) When I run the RRAS wizard it asks me for one of 5 options which one should I use.
            3) What do I need to do get RIPv2 going - and what does it do.

            what further steps are needed.

            On the second - I have tried the following which didn't seem to work.

            1) I added a second host network adaptor (VMnet2)
            2) Then gave it a fixed IP on the 10.0.245 network e.g. 10.0.245.50 and then put the default gateway on Host and Virtual network adaptors to 10.0.245.1

            3) I also tried adding 2 network adaptors in the virtual machine but it didn't seem to like that either.

            Could you explain the steps a little more fully please

            Thanks for the help.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: TEST LAB - Setup- Internet Access

              Originally posted by tongers View Post
              Thank you for the information:-

              I would like to try both to see which is best and have had a first shot at each:-

              On the first I have never used RRAS before - can you explain in a little more detail please :-

              1)Can I run RRAS on one of my current servers or does it need a server of its own
              2) When I run the RRAS wizard it asks me for one of 5 options which one should I use.
              3) What do I need to do get RIPv2 going - and what does it do.

              what further steps are needed.
              1) Yes you can run RRAS on an existing server so long as it has a NIC connected to each of the subnets. Afterall, in order to route traffic between the subnets, it must have physical connectivity to each of the subnets. The fundamental principle of a router is that it has interfaces (aka NICs) on each subnet that it routes traffic across.

              2) I don't use the wizard to configure RRAS but the type of router you are going to configure is a LAN routing. I skip the wizard and create the router manually. The configuration and components of RRAS is typically covered by an entire chapter in any reputable book or study guide. I can't possibly go into all the details here but I'll try to throw you some hints. Your RRAS IP router will look similar to attached screenshot rras1.jpg. Nevermind the Loopback and Internal interfaces. They keys are are the two Local Area Connections which represent your 2 NICs. RIP is the other key and I'll go into the RIP configuration in the next bullet.

              3) RIPv2 is installed as a bolt on to RRAS by right clicking "General" and choosing "New Routing Protocol". Select RIP. Once RIP is installed, be sure both interfaces are added to it (see rras2.jpg). You can add interfaces by right clicking RIP and choosing "New Interface". Next, you must configure the Properties for each interface (right click, properties). Configure each interface as shown in screenshot rras3.jpg. Next, you'll need to configure the hardware router on your network which provides the internet access. All small hardware routers have relatively the same screens and are fairly limited in configuration options to configure RIP. A properly configured Linksys will look similar to the screenshot rras4.jpg.

              What does it do? In short, RIP (acronym for Router Information Protocol) is a protocol for dynamically sharing network routes between devices that support the RIP protocol for the purposes of learning or discovering all routes on the network known by nearby "neighbors". A neighbor is an upstream or downstream router that shares its RIP information. Router A shares all that it knows with Router B. Router B shares all that it knows with Router C. And so on. It's a popular alternative to not creating static routing table entries on routers or network hosts. In this case, what we're doing is your hardware router is sharing information with the RRAS router on how to get to the internet. By virtue of the fact that your VMs will use the RRAS server as their default gateway, the RRAS server will properly route internet bound traffic to the hardware router and then out to the internet.

              Originally posted by tongers View Post
              On the second - I have tried the following which didn't seem to work.

              1) I added a second host network adaptor (VMnet2)
              2) Then gave it a fixed IP on the 10.0.245 network e.g. 10.0.245.50 and then put the default gateway on Host and Virtual network adaptors to 10.0.245.1

              3) I also tried adding 2 network adaptors in the virtual machine but it didn't seem to like that either.

              Could you explain the steps a little more fully please
              The second NIC you've added needs to be bridged to the PNIC in your host (typically VMnet0). You can verify your Host Virtual Network Mapping in VMware Server by choosing Host|Virtual Network Settings, and then choosing the Host Virtual Network Mapping tab. VMnet2 probably isn't defined unless you have a 2nd PNIC in your server which would need to be physically wired to the 10.0.245.0 subnet. The 10.0.10.0 network is essentially a virtual network which does not need to be bound to a bridged outbound adapter. I would bind these adapters in the VMs to VMnet1 (the default host only network) which will suffice for your purposes.

              It may be Visio drawing time for me to better explain the network diagram but let's see how far you get with this. I've already spent significant time with this post and would rather not spend a lot more time if it's not needed.
              Attached Files
              VCDX3 #34, VCDX4, VCDX5, VCAP4-DCA #14, VCAP4-DCD #35, VCAP5-DCD, VCPx4, vEXPERTx4, MCSEx3, MCSAx2, MCP, CCAx2, A+
              boche.net - VMware Virtualization Evangelist
              My advice has no warranties. Follow at your own risk.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: TEST LAB - Setup- Internet Access

                Tongers..

                As Jason and I saw in this other post you could most probably use the NAT feature of VMware to acheive this..

                Look at the other post to get some more info.
                Maish
                ----------------------------------------------------------
                Technodrone|@maishsk|Author of VMware vSphere Design
                VMware vExpert 2013-2010,VCAP5-DCA/DCD,VCP
                MSCA 2000/2003, MCSE 2000/2003
                A proud husband and father of 3 girls
                ----------------------------------------------------------
                If you find the information useful please don't forget to give reputation points sigpic.

                Have a good one!!

                Comment

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