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Can't add disk to Virtual machine

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  • Can't add disk to Virtual machine

    I have a disk which is being used on another (running) VMWare client and I want this disk to be used by a second VMWare client as well. The aim is to run two virtual servers who can see the one disk. If one virtual server crashes, we want to "flick a switch" on the other server so that it can continue the job of that one which crashed.

    So when I try to add the virtual disk to the new server, I get the error:

    Failed to power on SCSI0:2(/vmfs/volumes/########/cla-int1.vmdk.)
    Failed to add disk '/vmfs/volumes/########/cla-int1.vmdk' to scsi0:2.

    Is this because the virtual disk is already attached and used by, another virtual server?

    VMWare ESX Server 3.0.0
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    +-- JDMils
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    +-- Regional Systems Engineer, DotNet programmer & Jack of all trades
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  • #2
    Re: Can't add disk to Virtual machine

    Looks like I can't attach a virtual disk to two virtual servers. Is there anyway I can achieve this, sort of like setting up the virtual disk as a SAN device? Thanks.
    |
    +-- JDMils
    |
    +-- Regional Systems Engineer, DotNet programmer & Jack of all trades
    |

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    • #3
      Re: Can't add disk to Virtual machine

      Just create vm as iSCSI target. Point both VM's to it.


      hth
      Leave 'reputation' when deserved :

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Can't add disk to Virtual machine

        VMware product?
        Guest OS?

        What you're talking about is doable within some strict conditions.

        First of all, to be able to share a .vmdk disk among multiple powered on VMs, you must have SCSI bus sharing enabled on a separate virtual SCSI controller in the .vmx file of each VM that will have that disk configured for its use.

        Second, if you want all the VMs powered on at the same time, what you're really talking about is clustering an OS with shared disk. Without implementing an OS specific clustering technology, you'll just corrupt the shared disk. Microsoft clustering is commonly referred to as a "shared nothing" cluster, meaning, Microsoft cluster nodes to not "share" disks simultaneously - only one MS cluster node may be the sole owner of a given disk at any given time. Mulitple owners would quickly corrupt the disk.

        Third, if you're not talking about all VMs powered on at the same time, but rather one VM powered on and the other backup VM powered off in a "hot standby" mode, specify as much. But I don't think this offers much protection. What level of fault tolerance is this providing for?

        Jas
        VCDX3 #34, VCDX4, VCDX5, VCAP4-DCA #14, VCAP4-DCD #35, VCAP5-DCD, VCPx4, vEXPERTx4, MCSEx3, MCSAx2, MCP, CCAx2, A+
        boche.net - VMware Virtualization Evangelist
        My advice has no warranties. Follow at your own risk.

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