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Another Newbie Qustion - What happens to any virus infection ?

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  • Another Newbie Qustion - What happens to any virus infection ?

    As a newcomer to Virtual Machines , I understand that anything which happens inside such a machine is entirely separated from the host "real" machine.

    Therefore , supposing one was using the VM to surf the Web unprotected by any A/V or Firewall and became infected as a result - what would happen to the infecttions thus obtained when the VM was deleted ?

  • #2
    Re: Another Newbie Qustion - What happens to any virus infection ?

    If it is on the web then you are sharing networking somehow. This will mean there is always the probability of your host machine catching something too.
    cheers
    Andy

    Please read this before you post:


    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

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    • #3
      Re: Another Newbie Qustion - What happens to any virus infection ?

      Originally posted by thenoo View Post
      As a newcomer to Virtual Machines , I understand that anything which happens inside such a machine is entirely separated from the host "real" machine.
      Not entirely - my VMWare virtual machines can access the shared files and folders on the host machine just as if the VM was another physical machine on the LAN. My Micrsoft Virtual PC machines can access the files and folders by way of the host machine's hard disks that I can attach to the VM.

      A virus can therefore spread from the VM to the host machine. But you are right in theory that if, prior to such an infection, the VM is deleted, then the infection (if contained only in the VM) would also be deleted and therefore harmless.

      My recommendation is to always have up to date AV software on all VMs.
      Best wishes,
      PaulH.
      MCP:Server 2003; MCITP:Server 2008; MCTS: SBS2008

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      • #4
        Re: Another Newbie Qustion - What happens to any virus infection ?

        I can only second Andy and PaulH.
        You have to look at a virtual machine in the same way you look at a physical one: it has to be protected against the same threats, by the same means (AV, FW, VPN, whatever).
        Nevertheless, we seldom use virtual machines for testing purposes. And as such, sometimes the machines are less protected (as part of the testing). In such cases, one should very carefully consider sharing folders between the host and the virtual machine. Doing so may jeopardize the host itself. A very good practice is not to save changes after each session, and to always revert the virtual machine to a stable, clean state.

        Sorin Solomon


        In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
        -

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