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Genuine Advantage check fails in Virtual PC

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  • Genuine Advantage check fails in Virtual PC

    I downloaded and installed Microsoft Virtual PC 2007 (aka Virtual PC 6?) and bought a new copy of Windows XP Pro to set up a clean environment on my machine. I am a technical writer and need to install some apps in this environment without messing up my host machine.

    The XP install went fine, but the Windows Genuine Advantage check fails. It shows the Product Code from my host PC and displays the Product Key I entered for the XP install, says they don't match, and then fails.

    I assume this isn't normal. How does Virtual PC usually handle the genuine advantage check?

    The only clue that I have is that the host PC is supplied by one of my clients and that that PCs XP license is a corporate license and could be from who-knows-what region. The genuine advantage utility looks like it checks the region of the product as part of the product key validation. (I could be totally wrong with this, but it seems like this might be an issue).

    Any advice?

    Oops - One more thing. I tried to go as cheap as I could with the XP license... I want to be legit, but I didn't want to pay full price. So I bought a copy of Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP2C 32-bit for System Builders - 1 pack from an Amazon reseller. Seems like it's technically legit, since I'm "building" a virtual system. It's honestly as legit as I can afford to be.

  • #2
    Re: Genuine Advantage check fails in Virtual PC

    Three thoughts:

    1) It's legitimate to buy an OEM copy of Windows if you buy it with a computer system, or a non-peripheral component of a computer system that the copy will be installed on. Since you are installing it into a VM, you would probably get away with that piece of hardware being installed in the host system instead. Did you buy it with qualifying hardware?

    2) Keep in mind that an OEM copy is tied to the computer it is installed on, or the piece of hardware it was bought with. It can't legally be installed on another computer, or a computer that does not contain that piece of hardware.

    3) If the host OS is from a client's volume licence then I doubt that it is legal for it to be installed on your system. Volume licences are tied to a site, hence sometimes being known as "site licences". I would have to check with someone more experienced before I could say for certain whether or not your situation is legit or not.
    Gareth Howells

    BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

    Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

    Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

    "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

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    • #3
      Re: Genuine Advantage check fails in Virtual PC

      Originally posted by gforceindustries View Post
      Three thoughts:

      1) It's legitimate to buy an OEM copy of Windows if you buy it with a computer system, or a non-peripheral component of a computer system that the copy will be installed on. Since you are installing it into a VM, you would probably get away with that piece of hardware being installed in the host system instead. Did you buy it with qualifying hardware?
      I bought it from Amazon. It was a stand-alone product from a reseller (not directly from Amazon).

      2) Keep in mind that an OEM copy is tied to the computer it is installed on, or the piece of hardware it was bought with. It can't legally be installed on another computer, or a computer that does not contain that piece of hardware.
      There wasn't any fine print on Amazon's product page. I'm comfortable tip-toeing around the spirit of the license agreement. I paid for the product.

      3) If the host OS is from a client's volume licence then I doubt that it is legal for it to be installed on your system. Volume licences are tied to a site, hence sometimes being known as "site licences". I would have to check with someone more experienced before I could say for certain whether or not your situation is legit or not.
      The volume license is for XP on the host machine (owned by my client). By paying full price for the media from Amazon, I paid for an additional license for the Virtual PC. There shouldn't be any connection between the two licenses.

      I suppose as I test I could install all of this on a machine at home. If it works, then I could copy the virtual machine & disk to the target destination. I'm hoping to avoid future validation failures. Again, it's paid for, it ought to work.

      I'm pretty sure I'm on firm ground with the license. I'm looking for a technical solution though. I've been emailing MS support, but it takes > 24 hrs for every reply from them. I was hoping to resolve this today so I could start the project next week. (Tomorrow and Friday are holidays here in the U.S.)

      Thanks for the reply. Any thoughts on the technical hurdles? Did genuine advantage work seamlessly for you when you installed XP?

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      • #4
        Re: Genuine Advantage check fails in Virtual PC

        Has always worked fine for me, but then I don't use Virtual PC very often. I just wanted to point out the previous 3 points to you so you'd fully understand the restrictions of OEM licences. Point 3 was not connected to the use of Virtual PC in any way, but felt it was worth pointing out to you.
        Gareth Howells

        BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

        Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

        Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

        "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

        "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Genuine Advantage check fails in Virtual PC

          UPDATE: I created a new virtual disk and virtual machine on this box and ran the XP install again. It seems to be working this time. I've made it through about a dozen Windows Updates & reboots. I didn't see the Genuine Advantage step, but it must have been one of those, because it failed much sooner on the first install. Must have been user error somehow (impossible! ).

          It's on the SP3 install now, so I think I'm over the hump.

          I think I'm going to have to re-do the install again though, because I accidentally created the virtual disk too large for the final target destination. Oops. I'll see if I can't work around that for now.

          I'll report back if the install fails again.

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