Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

scripts.v2 roaming profile?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • scripts.v2 roaming profile?

    I have a folder that is created when some of our computers shut down c:\scripts.v2 It appears to be a profile backup, which I did not set up. it take the computer a while to shut down while it backs up the computer. I deleted at one time and my profile was lost.
    I don't have roaming profiles on and made a point to set the server to not allow roaming profiles because when some computers had an issues, they could only boot in roaming profile and settings would not be saved.
    My questions is, what is creating this folder, and can I/should I turn it off. The computers on the network used to shut down much faster.
    Server 2008 R2
    PCs are windows 7
    I already know I'm not that bright. Please be constructive. Only give your 2cents if it helps. Don't be condesending or demeaning. It doesn't make you look smart. You just look like an arse.
    Chris Robertson
    The Computer Doctor

  • #2
    I got no response. That is a bit scary.
    I already know I'm not that bright. Please be constructive. Only give your 2cents if it helps. Don't be condesending or demeaning. It doesn't make you look smart. You just look like an arse.
    Chris Robertson
    The Computer Doctor

    Comment


    • #3
      Are the affected computers all in the same OU? If so, check Group Policy and find out if a script runs at Shutdown. Have you checked the computers themselves - Scheduled Tasks?
      A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes they are all in the same domain, Forrest etc. I've checked the GPO and have found nothing. The only results I got from searches is bash programming. What let up to this was a IT company installed a inventory/management software and out network has acted funky ever since. I have been though all the Scheduled tasks, and startup, running programs and services. The only script that runs is the startup script mapped drives and I even turned that off.
        I already know I'm not that bright. Please be constructive. Only give your 2cents if it helps. Don't be condesending or demeaning. It doesn't make you look smart. You just look like an arse.
        Chris Robertson
        The Computer Doctor

        Comment


        • #5
          Download the Sysinternals tool called Autoruns and see what is running on the affected systems. There may be a process that is running all the time and which is configured to save the Profiles when you shutdown:
          https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/...or=-2147217396

          Look at the Local Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) and see if there are any scripts under Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Scripts (Startup/Shutdown). Double-click the Shutdown entry in the right-hand pane.

          Let us know how you get on.
          A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

          Comment


          • #6
            Those were the first things I looked at. I looked under computer & user configuration scripts. Nothing in either. I had a DNS issue on one computer/Username and it would only make temporary profile. This is not the same but similar.
            If I delete anything in the V2 desktop folder, it is gone from my desktop when I reboot.
            I already know I'm not that bright. Please be constructive. Only give your 2cents if it helps. Don't be condesending or demeaning. It doesn't make you look smart. You just look like an arse.
            Chris Robertson
            The Computer Doctor

            Comment


            • #7
              OK, how about turning on auditing for the folder so that you can see what is writing to it - it may give you a lead.

              Secondly, do you have a current support contract with the IT company that installed the inventory/management software? What is the software? If you have a contract have you spoken to them about it? If you don't have a contract, there's no harm in speaking to them anyway.
              A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

              Comment


              • #8
                The best way to find the culprit may be to use Process Monitor
                https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/...or=-2147217396
                A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm familiar and use Process monitor daily. Nothing shows up out of the ordinary. I'm not familiar with auditing. I can assign a user to audit, but not sure. I'll will read more on that. As far as the company that installed it, they claim it makes no changes like that, and they know less than I do about everything. They are mildly worthless. Thank you for the help.
                  One thing that I noticed the folder name is related to Bash programming. I have a hunch that it is similar to a roaming profile.
                  I already know I'm not that bright. Please be constructive. Only give your 2cents if it helps. Don't be condesending or demeaning. It doesn't make you look smart. You just look like an arse.
                  Chris Robertson
                  The Computer Doctor

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you are using Process Monitor to examine the activity occurring when the data is written to the folder you will probably have no need for auditing. Folder auditing simply records every write, deletion, folder access event etc. It entails a lot more work than Process Monitor to understand the data (because it is lumped in with everything else in the Windows logs). With Process Monitor you can capture all the events between 6:28 and 6:35, save the data set then interrogate it using Process Monitor's filters.
                    A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X