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how to move DC to new hardware ?

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  • how to move DC to new hardware ?

    I've searched high and low and have been unable to find any information on how to accomplish what seems to be a common task. I have a Windows 2003 server domain with 2 domain controllers (both GC's). I need to upgrade the server hardware to a brand new box on my main DC that runs DNS, DFS, FSMO roles, and other critical services/applications. I am on Service pack 1 on the server. I have numerous shares on the server that must be transferred along with permissions. I have explored the ASR method, but from my research I understand that this is not intended to be used on hardware that is not simlar from the original ASR backup hardware. I would appreciate any input on the best method of moving to new hardware.

    -Bracy

  • #2
    Re: how to move DC to new hardware ?

    I would say that the easiest way to do it is to build a new server with the OS installed and promote it to a DC.

    REMEMBER AND BACKUP UP YOUR SERVER BEFOREHAND

    Allow replication to occur between your DC's.

    Transfer The FSMO roles from the old DC to the new DC.
    Transfer DHCP, WINS to the new server. By this i mean create new instances of the DHCP scope and the wins database.
    Authorise the new server for DHCP in AD.
    DNS should be covered by AD.

    Once you have the new server up and running unplug the new one and ensure that replication and other services are working porperly on the server.

    Once everything is running as it should be power the old server up and demote the server and remove it from the domain. Then dispose of the server once you have wiped the hard drives.

    If memory servers me correctly you can then restore your data keeping existing security etc on your new server. This i can check for you.
    Last edited by wullieb1; 10th May 2006, 14:14.

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    • #3
      Re: how to move DC to new hardware ?

      To me, cloning the old DC would be the quickest and easiest method given all that you have running on that server.

      Cloning can be accomplished in one of a few common ways depending on your situation.

      1. If you have server class hardware, and the OS drives are using hardware mirroring, and the drives from the old hardware are compatible with the new hardware, then you can shut down the old hardware, pull a mirrored drive from the old server and put it in the new server. Windows will likely find new NICs and such, but those can be reconfigured to properly suit your networking needs. Different array controllers/chipsets may also present INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE BSOD on bootup so you may need to also get creative on resolving that issue by injecting the new array controller drivers onto the drive before you pull it from the old hardware.

      2. Software imaging. Altiris, Ghost, Acronis, etc. Note you will still have driver issues as I listed in #1 above for different hardware and chipsets, particularly with network, array controller, and video.

      3. Virtualize: P2V from old hardware to a virtual environment, then V2P back from virtual environment to the new physical hardware.

      I'm sure there are other good ways but these are the suggestions I have to offer right now for 1:1 cloning short of just deploying a new DC with a different name and transferring the roles.

      Jas
      VCDX3 #34, VCDX4, VCDX5, VCAP4-DCA #14, VCAP4-DCD #35, VCAP5-DCD, VCPx4, vEXPERTx4, MCSEx3, MCSAx2, MCP, CCAx2, A+
      boche.net - VMware Virtualization Evangelist
      My advice has no warranties. Follow at your own risk.

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      • #4
        Re: how to move DC to new hardware ?

        Thanks for the ideas. I'm really enticed by the P2V option as this seems like the most surefire way to retain all settings, application installs, etc. I'm exploring the purchase of the P2V Assisant. Thanks for the great suggestion.

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        • #5
          Re: how to move DC to new hardware ?

          Originally posted by elskin13
          Thanks for the ideas. I'm really enticed by the P2V option as this seems like the most surefire way to retain all settings, application installs, etc. I'm exploring the purchase of the P2V Assisant. Thanks for the great suggestion.
          If you have purchased the P2V Assistant then that would imply you are using VMware products and it is I that is the one who is impressed
          VCDX3 #34, VCDX4, VCDX5, VCAP4-DCA #14, VCAP4-DCD #35, VCAP5-DCD, VCPx4, vEXPERTx4, MCSEx3, MCSAx2, MCP, CCAx2, A+
          boche.net - VMware Virtualization Evangelist
          My advice has no warranties. Follow at your own risk.

          Comment

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