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  • EFS Question

    I read that it is best practice to create a folder for encryption instead of encrypting individual files. That way if you want to encrypt a file, just move it to the encrypted folder. The file will then take on the encryption attribute. I did this on my computer here and it works as I understand it. I created multiple Word and Notepad documents and did not encrypt them. WHen moved to my encrypted folder they become encrypted.
    However, reading on (Mastering Windows XP Professional Second Edition) if I move a file out of an encrypted folder it should become unencrypted. I have tried this and this is not the case. They remain encrypted when moved to the same local hard drive. I tried movign them to a network drive and they are still encrypted. I have read this section a couple times and am reading it right. Am I missing something?

  • #2
    Ok, reply to my own thread.

    I found this documentation..

    Moving or renaming encrypted files
    If a user moves a file to another folder, the file retains its encryption state, regardless of whether the destination folder is encrypted or unencrypted. For example, when moving an encrypted file to an unencrypted folder, the file remains encrypted. When moving an unencrypted file to an encrypted folder, the file remains unencrypted. Similarly, renaming an encrypted file does not alter its encrypted status.

    Copying encrypted files
    When copying encrypted files to an unencrypted folder, encryption always takes priority. Thus, when copying an unencrypted file to an encrypted folder, EFS automatically encrypts the file. When copying an encrypted file to an unencrypted folder, the file remains encrypted.

    Now, I followed these procedures to the letter and still the document I created does not change encryption status no matter where I copy or move the file too. The encryption attribute is still checked no matter what. The folder is encrypted and called 'Encrypted Files' and I created a new Word document and saved it in there. I am running Windows XP Professinal that is joined to a domain....LOL...is that it?? Maybe because I am joined to a domain??

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    • #3
      I don't see where you found that the file should become unencrypted...


      And I quote: "For example, when moving an encrypted file to an unencrypted folder, the file remains encrypted." AND "When copying encrypted files to an unencrypted folder, encryption always takes priority."

      Moving a file from an encrpted place to an unencrypted folder isn't going to change anything, it's still going to be encrypted.

      If you make a new word document outside of the encrypted folder, then move it in, it should make it encrypted. When you move it out, it should still be encrypted.
      Not what you are looking for I know, but nowhere in there does it say that it should magically unencrypt itself.
      "One thing a computer can do that most humans can't is be sealed up in a cardboard box and sit in a warehouse."
      -- Jack Handey [Deep Thoughts]

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      • #4
        Captain, thanks for the response but that isn't what it say int he book I am using to study with.

        Mastering Windows XP Professaional Second Edition by Mark Minasi

        Page. 287

        'If you move or copy a file from an encrypted folder into an unencrypted folder, encryption is removed.'

        Going by that statement, if I move a document from my encrypted folder into an unencrypted folder the encryption should be removed, and it is not.
        I've tried moving the document to the local hard disk drive, and to unencrtypted folders on a network drive. No matter what the encrpytion attribute is not removed.

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        • #5
          The second edition of the XP Professional book needed revision, hence the second edition, mayhaps it's time for a third edition?
          The XP Pro book about EFS probably isn't as good as EFS documentation about itself.

          If you've done it a hundred times, (what's the definition of insanity?) and it still works the way EFS says it's going to, you might as well write off that the book isn't 100% correct. Go with what you know and have seen.

          I still may be horribly wrong, but don't trust books with your life.
          "One thing a computer can do that most humans can't is be sealed up in a cardboard box and sit in a warehouse."
          -- Jack Handey [Deep Thoughts]

          Comment


          • #6
            Yea, I guess the book is a wrong. What I posted earlier with the reply to my original question was documentation that I found on Microsoft's site. It states exactly what you have said. I guess I will just assume this book has an error. Which I don't like, makes me wonder if the things I have read are accurate or not, I guess I will just keep putting what I read to use and see bring up any qeusitons I have. THanks again Captain.

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