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  • Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

    Hey guys,

    I was wondering if anyone knows a good resource for transitioning a network from using Windows 2003 RRAS and DHCP to a router?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

    What do you have on your system?

    Can't really answer you without knowing about your setup. Most things will just *work* once you replace the RRAS/DHCP server with a router. I'd be curious as to why you want to do this though, since the RRAS and DHCP features in Windows Server are certainly more fully-featured than the equivalent options in any router I've seen.
    Gareth Howells

    BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

    Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

    Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

    "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

      Originally posted by gforceindustries View Post
      What do you have on your system?

      Can't really answer you without knowing about your setup. Most things will just *work* once you replace the RRAS/DHCP server with a router. I'd be curious as to why you want to do this though, since the RRAS and DHCP features in Windows Server are certainly more fully-featured than the equivalent options in any router I've seen.
      Thats a very good question. Well we are going to be replacing the SBS box that the controls DHCP and RRAS are on later this year. I was thinking of keeping DHCP and ditching RRAS.

      The network in question has two ISPs that go through two different routers. The first router connects to an ISA server and the DC (SBS server running RRAS and DHCP). One thing that is a little confusing to me though is that the router connecting the ISA server to the internet is also connected to the SBS DC, and from what I have heard, that is not something you want to do.

      The second router connects directly to two other servers on the network on a seperate IP. All servers that connect to the routers have dual nics and have one nic to the router and another to a switch.

      Correct me if I am wrong but wouldnt it be better to have a router that does Dual WAN that goes to the ISA server and from the ISA server you have your internal network?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

        Please can you sketch a very basic diagram showing your setup and briefly describe what the servers do? It's hard to follow from your post.

        If you have 2 internet connections, then yes you would probably want a load balancing router. But I still wouldn't choose a router over Windows Server for DHCP. I recommended RRAS as I wasn't aware that you were using ISA.
        Gareth Howells

        BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

        Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

        Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

        "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

        "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

          I made a rough drawing of the network. I hope this helps.

          My mistake, I had issues uploading it as an image so I had to PDF it.
          Attached Files
          Last edited by alpha202ej; 25th August 2009, 19:38.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

            Please can you post it here?
            Gareth Howells

            BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

            Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

            Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

            "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

            "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

              Okay you should be able to see it in the previous post of mine now. I added it as a PDF.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

                An... unusual setup, certainly.

                IIS servers - since they're called IIS servers, shall I assume they don't do anything else? Can I assume the websites they host are to be viewable from the LAN and WAN?
                Gareth Howells

                BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

                Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

                Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

                "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

                "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

                  That is correct, the IIS servers have WAN and LAN accessible content.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

                    Ok. Based on the limited information I have, I would probably suggest a layout like in the attachment.

                    What version and edition of SBS? In 2003, it was "allowed" to put SBS at the edge, while not recommended. In 2008, that isn't supported.

                    What version and edition of ISA? Not sure how relevant that will be.

                    I don't believe ISA allows load balancing between two WAN connections - Standard edition certainly doesn't. If yours does, then you don't need the load-balancing router.

                    NB: The Perimeter network in ISA is also commonly referred to as a DMZ.

                    Edit: Depending on the type of modem you're using, you may not need the two individual routers between the modems and the load-balancing router. Plus, depending on what sort of WAN connection you have, you may want to get a router with built-in modems. If you have a pair of ADSL lines for example, there are a number of suitable routers on the market which will allow you to load-balance between a pair of internal ADSL modems.
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by gforceindustries; 25th August 2009, 20:56.
                    Gareth Howells

                    BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

                    Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

                    Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

                    "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

                    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

                      ISA can't do Loadbalancing between to ISP's yet however TMG is close.
                      However this is only for outbound access. For inbound you have to go for DNS round robin or something like that.

                      However in this scenario I would change quite a lot if I had the choice...
                      Kick out one ISP, make a DMZ on the ISA server for the IIS servers and move the SBS server behind the ISA server.
                      Last edited by Dumber; 26th August 2009, 21:52. Reason: typo...
                      Marcel
                      Technical Consultant
                      Netherlands
                      http://www.phetios.com
                      http://blog.nessus.nl

                      MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
                      "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

                      "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
                      "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

                        That was my suggestion too, other than kicking the second ISP.

                        Out of interest Alpha, why do you have two WAN connections? Is it for redundancy, or (more likely given your current setup) is it to stick the IIS servers on one public IP address, separate to Exchange (SBS) on another? Or do you have two because that's how it was setup and you've just inherited it this way?
                        Gareth Howells

                        BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

                        Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

                        Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

                        "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

                        "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

                          Originally posted by gforceindustries View Post
                          That was my suggestion too, other than kicking the second ISP.

                          Out of interest Alpha, why do you have two WAN connections? Is it for redundancy, or (more likely given your current setup) is it to stick the IIS servers on one public IP address, separate to Exchange (SBS) on another? Or do you have two because that's how it was setup and you've just inherited it this way?
                          They have two ISPs because one ISP is a cable service which does not allow for a static IP and one is DSL which does. They need the static for the web servers and want the cable becuase they think its fast (according to the old IT guy).

                          Yeah, we inherited this network and are cleaning it up.

                          BTW, the help is greatly appreciated!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

                            I'd ditch the cable connection. And if the old IT guy is still there, briefly explain to him why connection speed, not media, makes the difference
                            Gareth Howells

                            BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

                            Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

                            Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

                            "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

                            "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Transitioning RRAS and DHCP to Router

                              An other option is to put 2 ISA servers in place, one for each connection. However this can become quite costly
                              Marcel
                              Technical Consultant
                              Netherlands
                              http://www.phetios.com
                              http://blog.nessus.nl

                              MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
                              "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

                              "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
                              "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

                              Comment

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