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  • "My Computer" or "Windows Explorer" slooooowwwwww

    We have a 2003 R2 network.

    We use Riverbed to accelerate between at&t's MPLS network.

    Remote offices all of a sudden (3+ weeks) ago started experiencing intermittent slow "My Computer"

    It will just not show anything under the resources C: drive doesn't matter, for about a minute.

    This may happen every hour or twice in a row, very random

    Each remote office has a DC/global catalog, DHCP and WINS.

    We built a new workstation in our datacenter office and then drove it to our remote office, it now experiences the same lag/pause going to File -> Open.

    This tells me it is a DNS, AD, DC problem because it worked perfectly fine in the main office.

    The shares are DFS pointers, no replicated folders.

    They map to a drive letter R: which translates to \\domain.com\share

    Any ideas as to how to fix this?

    This problem is driving me crazy not to mention the users

  • #2
    Re: "My Computer" or "Windows Explorer" slooooowwwwww

    Does the DFS link which drive R: is mapped to points to a file server on the main datacenter, or to a file server on the same site where the workstation reside?

    If you click Net Use on the remote machines, do you see other connections (other than R?

    Try removing drive R: to a test user and see if he still experience the lags.

    Also, for further testing, create the following batch file:

    Code:
    echo. >> %temp%\ping.log 2>&1
    echo -------------------------------------------------------- >> %temp%\ping.log 2>&1
    TimeWithMS>> %temp%\ping.log 2>&1
    
    if not exist \\domain.com\share\. goto notexists
    echo share exists >>%temp%\ping.log
    goto continue
    
    :notexists
    echo share does not exist >> %temp%\ping.log
    
    :continue
    TimeWithMS >> %temp%\ping.log 2>&1
    echo. >> %temp%\ping.log 2>&1
    ping -l 1472 -f -n 10 domain.com 1>> %temp%\ping.log 2>&1
    echo. >> %temp%\ping.log 2>&1


    Schedule the batch file to run on one of the machines in the remote site every 30 seconds.
    Before you do it, make sure you get a proper reply using the specified parameters. If not, lower the buffer size (-L 1472) until you find the optimal value that works and post back that value.
    Also, extract the attached file "TimeWithMS.exe" and save it somewhere in your path. The file echos the time + milliseconds to the CMD console (will help us to measure the lag)

    Also, post back with some more information:
    1. Client OS
    2. Do you have the 'Wait For Network' policy set for the workstations?
    3. What is you 'Group Policy refresh interval' setting for those machines?
    4. What is the %logonserver% value on the machines? Is it the right server?
    5. Did you setup Active Directory Sites and Subnets properly?
    6. After running the batch file specified for a day or so, try to see if the problem takes place in a fixed interval, or is it completely random. You'll be able to do it by interpreting the log file.
    7. Check if you can recreate the problem by running ipconfig /flushdns and then open my computer.
    8. Do you use any kind of folder redirection?
    9. How do you map the drives? When mapping the drive, do you use the '/Persistent' switch (if using a batch), or 'True' as the third parameter (if using mapnetworkdrive through a vbs)?

    Thanks,
    Asaf Ganot.
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: "My Computer" or "Windows Explorer" slooooowwwwww

      A Lot of questions

      A brand new machine(no problems) from the datacenter side was taken to the remote site and bingo, problems after about 3+ hours on site.

      I really think I'm down to DNS or AD or WINS or DFS.

      Forgive me, I had a Microsoft tech look thru my network. They found no obvious errors.

      What is the opinion of removing AD from the remote sites and then
      re-dcpromo them back to DC/AD?

      Thanks

      XPP -> 1. Client OS

      ? 2. Do you have the 'Wait For Network' policy set for the workstations?

      ? 3. What is you 'Group Policy refresh interval' setting for those machines?

      main DC -> 4. What is the %logonserver% value on the machines? Is it the right server?

      don't know? 5. Did you setup Active Directory Sites and Subnets properly?

      6. After running the batch file specified for a day or so, try to see if the problem takes place in a fixed interval, or is it completely random. You'll be able to do it by interpreting the log file.

      Problem is definitely location specific -> 7. Check if you can recreate the problem by running ipconfig /flushdns and then open my computer.

      no -> 8. Do you use any kind of folder redirection?

      vbs script -> 9. How do you map the drives? When mapping the drive, do you use the '/Persistent' switch (if using a batch), or 'True' as the third parameter (if using mapnetworkdrive through a vbs)?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: "My Computer" or "Windows Explorer" slooooowwwwww

        Does the DFS link which drive R: is mapped to points to a file server on the main datacenter, or to a file server on the same site where the workstation reside?


        R: is completely virtual

        R:\locationA -> datacenter \\server1\share 10.0.1.100/16
        R:\locationB -> remote location \\server2\share 10.1.1.100/16
        R:\locationC -> remote location \\server3\share 10.2.1.100/16

        Three different virtual folders pointing to three different locations and three different servers.

        They are all connected via routers on the at&t MPLS network

        I tried disconnecting R: and same result

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: "My Computer" or "Windows Explorer" slooooowwwwww

          Frankly I don't see AD, DNS, or WINS causing this problem. Some questions:

          1. How long are the DFS link referrals cached for?
          2. What is the TTL of the A records for the DC's and File Servers?
          3. Are other types of network traffic affected?
          4. Have you run a network sniffer to look for broadcast storms, arp floods, etc.
          5. Have you looked at the switch and firewall logs?
          6. Can you set up a port monitor on your switch and firewall to analyze traffic?
          7. What other software is installed on the affected machines?

          Run "net use" from a command prompt on one of the affected machines and post the output here.

          Run pathping from an affected machine to one of the file servers and post the results here.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: "My Computer" or "Windows Explorer" slooooowwwwww

            I just got a message from the Domain controller that says, "ourdomain.com is not accessible. You might not have permission to use this network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to find out if you have access permissions. The list of servers for this workgroup is not currently available.

            "ourdomain.com" is our inside and outside domain

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: "My Computer" or "Windows Explorer" slooooowwwwww

              Sorry, the message came from the Domain controller in the remote office

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: "My Computer" or "Windows Explorer" slooooowwwwww

                When you say the message came from, what do you mean?
                Where did you see the message?

                Regarding Active Directory Sites and Services, you should use dssite.msc to create a subnet object for each physical IP subnet and assign the subnets to their relevant site.

                You can read further at http://www.activewin.com/win2000/ste.../adsites.shtml

                Did you run the batch test and got results?

                Comment

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