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Internal / external domain issue

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  • Internal / external domain issue

    Our internal domain is the same as our external domain name. The external website is hosted externally. We have two computers that cannot access our external website. What could be the cause? All computers in our network are members of the internal domain. We have 1 server which handles all our network needs, running Windows Server 2003

  • #2
    Re: Internal / external domain issue

    On your internal DNS server you need to add an A Record for your external web site.

    for example if your external web site's address is
    and when you ping from a computer outside your network you will get the IP address (for example
    then you would add an A record of www with an IP address of

    The reason that only some of the computers are affected might be that you are using external nameservers as well as local nameservers.

    Post an ipconfig /all from the server, one of the computers that can access the website, and also a computer that cant, so we can see what the problem might be.
    Last edited by John.S; 10th November 2007, 13:10.


    • #3
      Re: Internal / external domain issue

      Also, if you upload new web pages to your website, consider adding an A record for ftp too. Just add "ftp" the same way as described by John in his good post for "www".

      Use the tool nslookup (it's built in, no need to download it) to find out what the PC is looking at when trying to access and it will indicate which (either the internal or the external) DNS server is being used by the PC. As John said, this is the reason why it behaves differently on each PC, but by using nslookup you can determine exactly what is going on and get a depper understanding of how each PC is behaving.
      Best wishes,
      MCP:Server 2003; MCITP:Server 2008; MCTS: SBS2008


      • #4
        Re: Internal / external domain issue

        After you sort this out make sure that all PC's and DC's point to the your local DNS server.

        Then set your DNS server to point to the DNS server provided by your ISP.
        "...if I turn out to be particularly clear, you've probably misunderstood what I've said” - Alan Greenspan