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Noobies Setting up Windows 2003 Server with Remote Administration

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  • Noobies Setting up Windows 2003 Server with Remote Administration

    A friend and I were given a Dell Server running Windows Server 2003 Standard. We have setup simple domain controllers, but I'm pretty sure we did not do everything correctly. We just did the bare minimum to get them up and running, so our knowledge is very limited when it comes to servers. What we want to do is set the server up at one of our houses, and then allow remote administration so we both can administer it equally. The server would mostly be used to host files, run games, and maybe later a small website. Both of us run small home networks, so the best way to incorporate the server is by making the setup modem > server > router. Is that correct? Will we need to enable DHCP on the server in order to allow the router to connect to it, and then turn DHCP off on the router?

    Main Questions:

    1. How should we incorporate the server into the existing home network?
    2. Which server roles do we need to install?
    3. How do we setup remote administration?

  • #2
    Re: Noobies Setting up Windows 2003 Server with Remote Administration

    What is the purpose of the server? You say
    would mostly be used to host files, run games, and maybe later a small website
    , but then you ask
    Which server roles do we need to install?
    Meaning, you want to make it a DC? You want to establish a domain on it? If you do that, will you change your home network from Workgroup to Domain too (let's assume the server is at your house)? And how your friend will connect to it? RDP is one thing, but logging into a domain through some RAS method is another.
    What is your Internet connection? High-speed (DSL, cables, etc.)?
    Answers to your questions:
    1) you should connect the server to the router, meaning: Modem -> Router -> Server, the same you connected your other machines in your network. If you want a static IP for your server, you can check the DHCP on the router if it has exclusion ranges, set its IP in there and set the server's IP manually. I wouldn't use the server as DHCP. If you want to test a DHCP server, I would go into virtual (by setting a virtual server and at least one virtual computer).
    2) depends on what you answer to my previous question.
    3) you'll need to allow Remote Desktop Connections on the server (see the attached screenshot) and allow it in the firewall, if you set one. You won't have problems connecting to it, but with your friend will be another issue. He won't be able to connect to the server by it's IP address, of course, since this address is internal. And depends on what ports your ISP and your friend's ISP allow open on their nets. Do you two have the same ISP?

    I hope this info helps somehow. Let us know.
    Last edited by sorinso; 9th November 2007, 21:29.

    Sorin Solomon


    In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
    -

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Noobies Setting up Windows 2003 Server with Remote Administration

      Thanks for replying. To answer your initial question about setting it up as a DC, I would rather not as long as it is not necessary for what we want to do. I mentioned server roles because I figured we would have to set it as an FTP server to host files and I thought we would need IIS to host a website. Is this not the case? I think I may just be over complicating this.

      Let's say we connect it to the existing network by the router, make it part of a workgroup, enable remote desktop connections, and allow it in the firewall (what is the default remote connection port that should be opened in the router?), then what would be the next logical step?

      Recap:
      -No DC
      -Host files that anyone, anywhere can download not just us and not just people in the network.
      -Host a website
      -Host games (I think all this requires is for the right ports to be opened.)


      We are both on the same cable ISP, and we both have the same connection speed of 5mb/512kb.

      I think I answered most of your questions. Sorry for the incoherency.
      Last edited by stryker2310; 4th March 2007, 19:49.

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      • #4
        Re: Noobies Setting up Windows 2003 Server with Remote Administration

        OK, I'm glad to hear DC is not in plans. It would have complicated things
        To host a website on this server, you will need to add IIS = Internet Information Services . It contains both FTP and Web services (that can be installed together or separate, according to your needs).
        If you want to allow files to be downloaded from your server, maybe the Web server will be enough. Your users will be able to download the files through a web page, thus no need for FTP.
        The RDP protocol works on port 3389. You should contact your ISP and check if this port is open on their internal network. If not, ask them how your friend can connect to the server, they might have a policy for this. If not, we'll think of something.
        Regarding the games' hosting, I don't know enough in this field to give others advices. Sorry, maybe other good people around can help.
        Don't forget that your upload speed is 512KB. All the outgoing traffic from the server out will share this (not so wide) bandwith.
        Hope this info is what you were looking for.

        Sorin Solomon


        In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
        -

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Noobies Setting up Windows 2003 Server with Remote Administration

          I think we should be able to figure it out now. At least we will be on the right track. You have been very helpful. Thanks!! Great Forum.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Noobies Setting up Windows 2003 Server with Remote Administration

            I am glad to hear.
            Good luck. And keep the forum posted about the outcome. (This is one of the ways to show your gratitude. This way, a user that will come tomorrow with the same problem, will know what you did).

            Sorin Solomon


            In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
            -

            Comment

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