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  • Trouble with new client server network

    Hello all,

    I need some help with my client server setup at home. This is the first time I am attempting anything like this and I need some guidance. I am attempting to setup a client server network with 1 stand alone server and three other workstations.

    Thus far I have installed windows 2000 server on my server (all other pc's have been running XP Pro) I have the DHCP working correctly and DNS has been setup. However, I am having a problem forwarding all DNS requests that the server can't resolve to the internet.

    I have deleted the root forward lookup zone and enabled forwarders with the IP addresses of what I think are the comcast DNS servers (I have not actually called comcast, I found a listing of their servers on the web). But none of my computers including the server have web access.

    I am not sure that I even have everything connected properly. I have a cabel modem and a netgear router. I have turned off the DHCP in the router to allow all IP's to come from my server. I then have all 4 computers connected to the router which should be acting more as a switch.

    My question is should I be using the IP of the router as the gateway in my DHCP or should that be the IP of the server? I know that most people have the forwarders setup to go to the ISP DNS servers but it seems that even the server can't get access to the open web. So should the modem be connected directly to the server and the server connect to the router/switch? Also the IP of the router is static but it is out of the range of the scope of my DNS, is that throwing things off? I have even tried putting the IP of the router as the forwarders and that didn't work. I have tried reading as many articles as I can find on the web about configuring DNS for internet use but I still can't seem to get access on any PC.

    If anyone can help me gain some insight as to what is happening I would appreciate it.

    Thanks,
    Kxcntry99
    Last edited by kxcntry99; 8th November 2006, 19:36.

  • #2
    Re: Trouble with new client server network

    The physical setup seems OK but I think maybe your IP addresses, gateway, and/or subnet mask is off. Could you post the IP configuration of:
    -Server
    -Clients
    -Router

    Please include the address, gateway, and subnet mask.

    Here's some things to read that will get you started learning how to configure these types of things.
    http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=164015
    http://computer.howstuffworks.com/router.htm/printable
    http://www.howstuffworks.com/nat.htm/printable
    http://technet2.microsoft.com/Window....mspx?mfr=true
    Regards,
    Jeremy

    Network Consultant/Engineer
    Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
    www.gma-cpa.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Trouble with new client server network

      Thanks for helping out Jeremy, the IP setup looks like this:

      Client1
      Address Type: Assigned by DHCP
      Ip Address:192.168.1.100
      Subnet: 255.255.255.0
      Default Gateway 192.168.0.1
      DHCP Server: 192.168.1.128
      DNS Server: 192.168.1.128

      Server1
      Address Type: Manually Configured
      IP Address: 192.168.1.128
      Subnet:255.255.255.0
      Default Gateway 192.168.0.1
      DNS Server: 192.168.1.128

      Router
      IP Address:192.168.0.1
      Subnet:255.255.255.0
      DHCP: Off

      Now the Scope of the DHCP on the server runs from 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150 therefore the IP of my router is out of that range. Would this mess things up? I have tried pinging the server from my client and that results in 0% loss, however, when I try to ping the router (192.168.0.1) from either the server or the client I get a 'host is unreachable' error. So for whatever reason my router cannot be seen by anone on the domain.

      On the server I still have the DNS forwarders setup to go to 1 of the comcast DNS resolvers but I also threw in the router's IP since I am not sure if that is supposed to be there or not. But I guess this is irrelevant since no computer can reach the router anyway.

      Any ideas? Is it just because the router's IP is out of range of the server's scope? I guess I will try changing the IP of my router and see if that makes a difference.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Trouble with new client server network

        Your default gateways are wrong or your subnet mask is.

        Client1
        Address Type: Assigned by DHCP
        Ip Address:192.168.1.100
        Subnet: 255.255.255.0
        Default Gateway 192.168.0.1
        DHCP Server: 192.168.1.128
        DNS Server: 192.168.1.128

        Server1
        Address Type: Manually Configured
        IP Address: 192.168.1.128
        Subnet:255.255.255.0
        Default Gateway 192.168.0.1
        DNS Server: 192.168.1.128

        Router
        IP Address:192.168.0.1
        Subnet:255.255.255.0
        DHCP: Off
        Both the IP Addresses youhave given are on a different subnet to your router. Change the routers IP address to 192.168.1.1 and change the clients default gateway to 192.168.1.1.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Trouble with new client server network

          Yep, your IP addresses are on two different subnets. Change and you'll be fine, as stated...UNLESS: your router and/or modem does not do multiple NAT's. This should not be the case, but is possible with some home devices.

          What model router and modem are you using?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Trouble with new client server network

            Thank you very much guys...actually after I posted the IP setup I ended up changing the IP of the router to 192.168.1.103 and changed the gateway in the DHCP and I got it. I didn't realize how much of a problem that would be but now everything seems to work great...

            So is this the best practice for my setup? To have the modem plugged into the router, DHCP from my server and have all DNS requests that can't be resolved forwarded to my router. Or should I have the modem plugged into my server and allow the server to act as a router? Whould there be any benefits to this? It seems that my current setup would be the simplest, but I am curious as to the drawbacks if any.
            Last edited by kxcntry99; 8th November 2006, 16:15.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Trouble with new client server network

              Originally posted by kxcntry99 View Post
              Thank you very much guys...actually after I posted the IP setup I ended up changing the IP of the router to 192.168.1.103 and changed the gateway in the DHCP and I got it. I didn't realize how much of a problem that would be but now everything seems to work great...
              You should move the manually configured devices out of your DHCP scope i.e. router and server.

              e.g. change the router IP to 192.168.1.1 and the server IP to 192.168.1.2

              So is this the best practice for my setup? To have the modem plugged into the router, DHCP from my server and have all DNS requests that can't be resolved forwarded to my router. Or should I have the modem plugged into my server and allow the server to act as a router? Whould there be any benefits to this? It seems that my current setup would be the simplest, but I am curious as to the drawbacks if any.
              I think you current setup is fine.
              Forwarding DNS to the router is fine as long as it acts as a DNS proxy otherwise you should forward it to your ISP's DNS server(s).
              Regards,
              Jeremy

              Network Consultant/Engineer
              Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
              www.gma-cpa.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Trouble with new client server network

                Jeremy,

                Thanks for the tip...I will move the IP of the server and router out of the scope. To be honest I was having so much trouble that I was trying to keep everything in the same range; but after reading the links that you posted yesterday I see that as long as my subnet is the same then I should be ok.


                Originally posted by JeremyW View Post
                I think you current setup is fine.
                Forwarding DNS to the router is fine as long as it acts as a DNS proxy otherwise you should forward it to your ISP's DNS server(s).
                Do all routers at as a DNS proxy or did I just get lucky with my netgear?



                Thanks for all the help everyone...Now I am going to try setting up a VPN fun times
                Last edited by kxcntry99; 8th November 2006, 17:57.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Trouble with new client server network

                  Originally posted by kxcntry99 View Post
                  Jeremy,

                  Thanks for the tip...I will move the IP of the server and router out of the scope. To be honest I was having so much trouble that I was trying to keep everything in the same range; but after reading the links that you posted yesterday I see that as long as my subnet is the same then I should be ok.
                  Correct. It looks like you have a grasp on the concepts.

                  Let me just clarify two things:
                  - A DHCP scope is a range of IP addresses that you specify which the DHCP server will hand out. In your case you set the scope from 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150.
                  - Your subnet range, dictated by your subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, is 192.168.1.1 thru 192.168.1.254. Computers need to be on the same subnet (i.e. "range") if you want them to be able to communicate without using a router.

                  Judging from your comment it looks like you understand the above.



                  Do all routers at as a DNS proxy or did I just get lucky with my netgear?
                  Not all but it's common enough.
                  Regards,
                  Jeremy

                  Network Consultant/Engineer
                  Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
                  www.gma-cpa.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Trouble with new client server network

                    Originally posted by JeremyW View Post
                    - Your subnet range, dictated by your subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, is 192.168.1.1 thru 192.168.1.254. Computers need to be on the same subnet (i.e. "range") if you want them to be able to communicate without using a router.
                    Ok so now you raised another question...why does my subnet end with 192.168.1.254??? why not .999?? What if its an extremely large network with more than 253 computers attached...how do they communicate then?

                    I guess I am opening up a can of worms on this one since I am sure the answer is going to be that the network is would be A LOT more advanced then my little home setup, but still I have to ask.

                    Thanks for all your help guys.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Trouble with new client server network

                      Originally posted by kxcntry99 View Post
                      Ok so now you raised another question...why does my subnet end with 192.168.1.254??? why not .999?? What if its an extremely large network with more than 253 computers attached...how do they communicate then?

                      I guess I am opening up a can of worms on this one since I am sure the answer is going to be that the network is would be A LOT more advanced then my little home setup, but still I have to ask.

                      Thanks for all your help guys.
                      You have asked a mouth full. I'll give you a hint and then you can start ing.

                      The subnet mask tells (among a few other things) how many "hosts" can be on the subnet. If you change the subnet mask to 255.255.254.0 you would then have the possibility of 510 hosts on the network. If you changed the netmask to 255.255.248.0 would then have the possibility of 1022 hosts on the network. This trend continues until you have well over a million hosts possible. Now it may look like I'm just picking random numbers for the netmask but I'm actually doing it in order. (Try googling "What is a subnet mask" for more info)

                      OK, a quick note on the digits and then you're off to away.
                      You'll notice the IP address is made up of four numbers separated by a dot (.). This is because the IP address is made up of four binary octets. Therefore the highest number in any of the four octets can be is 255. (999 is impossible) (base10 255 = base2 11111111)

                      HTH
                      Regards,
                      Jeremy

                      Network Consultant/Engineer
                      Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
                      www.gma-cpa.com

                      Comment

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