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I've been reading up on SBS 2011, and I'm very, very confused

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  • I've been reading up on SBS 2011, and I'm very, very confused

    Hello all,
    I thought that the wonderful folks around here may have some insight into this. I was reading up on the editions of Small Business server (not that I deal with it, but in case my future job calls me to do so), and I find some interesting discrepancies that Microsoft seems not to see or to imply that we know what they're talking about. Firstly is the issue of how Exchange would be deployed on SBS 2008/2011 standard (I've never fooled with Exchange, never had to (yet)). I mean, if Microsoft talks about Exchange being in multi-server environments, how on earth do they expect for a standard SBS licensee to go for their SBS offerings if those are usually single-server networks without the Premium add-on as of 2011? and then there's the issue of SQL server. If one does not want to fool with obtaining the premium add-on, how then can they install SQL Server? Can they purchase a regular Standard license to install on the Standard SBS Server? And then what about standard roles? Does SBS have the same roles as do the regular versions of Server? And then there's the final thing I was confused about. What about Windows Standard FE (WinWESS)? You know the version of the core OS that's the base of SBS? Is that available as a standalone for the 2011 editions? And if so, why would anyone want to use it when they have the foundation edition (what I have), that does virtually the same exact thing? Thanks for any clarifications from your point of view.

  • teiger
    replied
    Re: I've been reading up on SBS 2011, and I'm very, very confused

    And to try and answer another point brought up in the OP's questions:
    Windows Foundation Server is positioned as a platform for 15 users. You could add it to use as a terminal server in an SBS environment, if there are, or will be, less than 15 users in the AD. It has the usual basic Server tools and consoles for management.
    OTOH, SBS essentials is positioned as a server solution (as opposed to platform) for 25 Users. It has a simplified management console for everyday tasks. It installs all roles and features for you in an integrated setup. It includes a special feature of client backup (as an image) which is very efficient in its use of disk space. It uses wizards for all of its functions.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ossian
    replied
    Re: I've been reading up on SBS 2011, and I'm very, very confused

    Premium also gives you SQL Server as part of the bundle IIRC. Basically get two server licenses (SBS + Additional) plus Exchange + SQL in one package. Any more server licenses and you have to buy them separately

    Leave a comment:


  • cruachan
    replied
    Re: I've been reading up on SBS 2011, and I'm very, very confused

    Buying SBS Premium gives you a second Windows license as part of the package. Whether it's any cheaper or not I don't know, the reason EBS got canned was that someone pointed out to MS it was cheaper to buy the individual components.

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  • Chromebuster
    replied
    Re: I've been reading up on SBS 2011, and I'm very, very confused

    Really? Then why does it say that a premium license is required to install another server into the network? Jees, it's a good thing I haven't yet had to deal with SBS then, isn't it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ossian
    replied
    Re: I've been reading up on SBS 2011, and I'm very, very confused

    No, SBS Essentials does not include Exchange. SBS standard does. Correct, you do not get ET.

    SBS will work very happily with other servers, indeed with other DCs, in the domain

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  • Chromebuster
    replied
    Re: I've been reading up on SBS 2011, and I'm very, very confused

    Oh. Okay. Thanks, because that does clear up a lot. and now you said that the version of Exchange in SBS is not the essentials version. Would you basically equate that to Exchange Server without say, the Edge Transport server role or one of the others? And it seems like SBS is definitely meant for single-server networks, and seriously, but how many of those are their anymore in the corporate/SMB world?

    Leave a comment:


  • Ossian
    replied
    Re: I've been reading up on SBS 2011, and I'm very, very confused

    OK, quite a few questions there:
    Exchange is included with SBS (OK, not the Essentials version) and installs as part of the setup. Almost no admin effort required.

    All the regular server roles are there, many installed already -- clearly it is NOT recommended to install the Remote Desktop Services one.

    Nothing to stop you installing SQL server on the SBS box -- premium license may be cheaper than the regular SQL one.

    Windows Foundation Edition is Server 2008, but with connection restictions to limit it to 15 connections, with no licensing requirements (a bit like a desktop operating system). AFAIK SBS is based on the normal Server 2008 Standard, with its own stuff on top. You could combine FE with it (on a different box) but I believe you will then run into problems if you go over 15 users in the domain

    Leave a comment:

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