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  • SBS 2003 to SBS 2008 Migration Domain Question

    We are currently trying to figure out how to upgrade our SBS 2003 server to SBS 2008. The server runs our internet, is the domain controller, print services, etc. We do NOT run exchange.

    The question I have is the following: I would like to do a clean install of SBS 2008, however I am worried about migrating the user profiles because some of the software we use has files embedded in to the user profile folders in random places and it is very difficult if not impossible to find. our current domain is named companyname.local if I name the new domain companyname.local will the machines recognize it is the same domain?

    It is important to note that we are not installing a new machine, but simply upgrading the current machine.

    We are a small business with a limited budget and just enough IT experience to get us into trouble.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Jesse


    -- After reading through a number of other posts, I realized that anyone looking at this will need some more information.So here goes.--

    Our current system is Windows SBS 2003 R2 32 bit.

    The main reasons for this change is to utilize all 8GB of RAM we currently have installed, do away with the overly small 30Gb OS partition that SBS2K3 'requires' and dedicate a new hard drive to the OS, and to standardize all of our machines to the SBS2K8/Windows 7 platform.

    We do not have the capability to do a swing migration as spare servers are non-existent.

    Ideally I would install new hard drives, make them boot disks, load the new OS, set it up as the DC, file share, print server, etc. name the domain the same name, and everything would work just peachy. I could then go through and repartition the old disks, remove the old OS and have a new server which functions better.

    After reading some posts, however I feel that it may not be quite that easy.

    Thanks for any help and sorry for the long first post.

    Regards,
    Jesse
    Last edited by trevlyan006; 25th May 2011, 15:53. Reason: Provided more information about problem and hardware

  • #2
    Re: SBS 2003 to SBS 2008 Migration Domain Question

    No chance.

    Names are just names. They map to SIDs which are unique. A new domain will have completely different security setup so your PCs will not work.

    If you have to migrate back to the same hardware you could do what a friend recently did:

    1) Create Symantec System Recovery Image of 2003 SBS
    2) Find a PC that you can nab for a week or two, back that up to an image and then restore the server image to it. If you are careful in your choice you might even get it to boot without using the bare metal restore. My friend went from a HP ML350 G4 to a newer HP Intel based PC and didn't need the bare metal.
    3) Put your new hard drives in the old server after you have fully tested the temporary PC to make sure it is running 2003 SBS properly.
    4) Pick your chosen 2003 -> 2008 migration documentation and follow it.

    I would be inclined to suggest going up to 2011 these days anyhow rather than 2008.

    Alternatively to save on costs, if you aren't using Exchange and have no plans on doing so, you could migrate to Server 2008 R2 instead. If you're feeling like experimenting, you could look at replacing step 2 with some sort of virtualization of the old server.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: SBS 2003 to SBS 2008 Migration Domain Question

      You can do a swing migration using the same physical server for both W2K3 and W2K8 if you have a box that you can install a temporary virtual W2K3 DC on. This is one of the scenario options when using a swing kit from sbsmigration.com. After the migration is done you can throw away the virtual DC.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: SBS 2003 to SBS 2008 Migration Domain Question

        Note 1: Swing Migration costs about $200 and is THE method to do a migration on a low budget - there is no cheaper method, and it also lets you keep your current server in production for the longest amount of time. Also the point of no return is pushed way down the line, so if you make a mistake before that point, you can go back to the beginning and start again with almost no damage to your system.
        Note 2: A temprary Server in my Swing Migrations is/was a VirtualPC on my laptop that had a total of 1.25MB RAM on it, and about 16GB of disk space. Add to this the size needed for an Exchange installation and you see how few resources you need to proceed.
        Note 3: You could read and use the MS docs which are free, but, if you don't mind me saying so, your post seems to imply that your experience level is not too high and you might find you are using procedures - which are not simple to implement - ending up trashing your system without a way back.
        TIA

        Steven Teiger [SBS-MVP(2003-2009)]
        http://www.wintra.co.il/
        sigpic
        I’m honoured to have been selected for the SMB 150 list for 2013. This is the third time in succession (no logo available for 2011) that I have been honoured with this award.

        We don’t stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: SBS 2003 to SBS 2008 Migration Domain Question

          Thanks for all of the replys. As a couple of you have mentioned, this is a little out of my league. I have consulted with a few IT companies in my area and they have quoted approximately $2,000-3,000 to perform a swing migration.

          A little out of our price range.

          Since our domain is small (approximately 10 workstations) we have instead decided to do a clean install of Windows Server 2011 (as recommended in a reply) and then migrate all of our user profiles to the new domain (approximately 10 profiles). I think that because of the scope of our domain this will provide the most cost effective solution and is within my IT skills and abilities. My brother just did this for a friend's business and it went perfectly (he is 16).

          Again, I appreciate all of the input and help as well as the prompt replies.

          Regards,
          Jesse

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: SBS 2003 to SBS 2008 Migration Domain Question

            SBS Migration Kit (www.sbsmigration.com) costs about $200, so with time added, $2K seems reasonable. You could buy the kit and do it yourself, though
            Tom Jones
            MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
            PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
            IT Trainer / Consultant
            Ossian Ltd
            Scotland

            ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: SBS 2003 to SBS 2008 Migration Domain Question

              Hopefully this will help you........

              http://demazter.wordpress.com/2011/0...s-server-2011/
              " DreaM is not what u saw in Sleep,
              DreaM is that which not let u Sleep "

              Life is Beautiful..!!!
              ¨`•.•´¨) Always
              `•.¸(¨`•.•´¨) Keep
              (¨`•.•´¨)¸.•´ Smiling!
              `•.¸.•´
              Raj only raj

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: SBS 2003 to SBS 2008 Migration Domain Question

                Just a thought. If you are not running Exchange and have less then 25 users, then check out the possibility of moving to SBS 2011 Essentials. Again you can use the MS method or SBSMigration (Swing) method.
                TIA

                Steven Teiger [SBS-MVP(2003-2009)]
                http://www.wintra.co.il/
                sigpic
                I’m honoured to have been selected for the SMB 150 list for 2013. This is the third time in succession (no logo available for 2011) that I have been honoured with this award.

                We don’t stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing.

                Comment

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