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  • Renaming production SBS server

    Hey all,

    I have a software support company that is requiring us to change the name of our SBS Server, so that our new database server can have the SBS Servers name. The reason for doing this, is so that the comms to the database will not need to be altered.

    The system is run over a WAN, and the changes can take up to 4-5hrs to complete per location, 5 of them.

    I need to outline to them that this is a definite no no, are there any MS Articles relating to the above? I have searched, but cannot locate.

    Failing that, can those reading this, please repond with your definitive pro and cons to completing the above.

    Muchly appreciated
    Ryan South

  • #2
    Re: Renaming production SBS server

    I'm not that expereanced with SBS, but it does seem to be like a bad idea.
    Although you can rename a Windows Server 2003 domain controller, it is certainly not the case with Exchange. For short, you can not rename a Windows Server that is running Exchange.
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    • #3
      Re: Renaming production SBS server

      Technically, you could rename an SBS, but compared to the 4-5 hours of your WAN synch, it would take much longer, be much riskier, and require a lot more support.
      IMHO you are better off, starting clean with a new domain (AD) though I find it incredible that the database HAS to have the same name as the SBS. Check with the vendor whether they are not just trying to make their life easy whilst complicating yours!
      You don't say how many users you have at this company, but each one will have to be recreated if you create a new domain. Use Exmerge to save their mail and FSTW to save each user's settings.

      Good Luck
      TIA

      Steven Teiger [SBS-MVP(2003-2009)]
      http://www.wintra.co.il/
      sigpic
      Iím honoured to have been selected for the SMB 150 list for 2013. This is the third time in succession (no logo available for 2011) that I have been honoured with this award.

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      • #4
        Re: Renaming production SBS server

        It seems that my previous post is not correct.
        To my believe it was impossible to rename an Exchange server, but discovered that it is possible.

        Q. How do you rename the Microsoft Exchange Server computer name?
        A. Note that this will only work if there is only one Microsoft Exchange Server in the Site. This information can also be found in the Microsoft Exchange Resource Kit.

        Caution: When you rename a server you lose: • All connector/DXA configurations on the server.


        • All non-recipient configurations on the server.


        • All profiles for users that connect to the server.
        To rename the computer running Microsoft Exchange Server: 1. Disconnect all clients from the server.
        2. In the Microsoft Exchange Server Administrator program, select the Server name - Advanced tab.
        3. Under IS/DS Consistency Adjustment, select a method for adjusting inconsistencies. This step ensures that the information store is up-to-date.
        4. From the Tools menu, choose Directory Export.
        5. Ensure that the Assoc-NT-Account field has been exported. You use this file to restore the mailbox, distribution list, and customer recipient permissions.
        6. Quit all Microsoft Exchange Server services.
        7. Back up \dsadata\dir.edb.
        8. Back up \mdbdata\priv.edb and pub.edb.
        9. Run the Microsoft Exchange Server Setup program, and choose Remove All.
        10. Restart your computer. and delete \exchsrvr.
        11. In the Main program group, double-click Control Panel.
        12. Double-click Server and then rename the server.
        13. Restart your computer.
        14. Run the Microsoft Exchange Server Setup program. Choose the same organization and site names as before.
        15. Restart your computer.
        16. Quit all Microsoft Exchange Server services.
        17. Delete *.log from \dsadata and \mdbdata.
        18. Restore \mdbdata\priv.edb and pub.edb. If offline copy, run isinteg -patch.

        IMPORTANT: Do not restore the files from \dsadata.
        19. Restart the Microsoft Exchange Server services.
        20. Run the IS/DS Consistency Adjustment again on the private and public Information Stores. The consistency adjustment will re-create the directory without any permissions.
        21. Import the directory file created in step 4. Be sure to select Append in the Multi-Valued Properties box.

        Your server should now be running with the same mailboxes and Public Folders but it will have a new server name.

        Altough renaming is the same as reinstalling Exchange....
        Last edited by Killerbe; 24th January 2008, 12:46. Reason: typo
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        • #5
          Re: Renaming production SBS server

          That sounds like a method for Exchange 5.5. Make sure you are looking at the correct version.

          Here is a tutorial. Make sure you fully understand every step and have a backup/fallback path before starting:
          http://www.msexchange.org/tutorials/Domain-Rename.html
          TIA

          Steven Teiger [SBS-MVP(2003-2009)]
          http://www.wintra.co.il/
          sigpic
          Iím honoured to have been selected for the SMB 150 list for 2013. This is the third time in succession (no logo available for 2011) that I have been honoured with this award.

          We donít stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing.

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