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  • Wi Fi Security Issue

    Hi ,

    I am using Wi fi Router with WEP Enabled 128 bit password protected encyption technology . Now the strange thing i come to know is my clients are able to get connect the wifi without prompting for password but they are getting the this ip 169.254.108.201 which is not matching with my range of DHCP , they are not able to bowser my internal network or not able to send packets out to google or yahoo ..but the strange is why are able to get connect automatically ..

    While i am try to connect my network manually its asking me the password . That is fine ...

    Can any one tell me why this is happen ..

    Thanks ,

    Kathy

  • #2
    Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

    Well they don't otherwise they will receive an IP address.
    169.254.x.x is an APIPA address
    Marcel
    Technical Consultant
    Netherlands
    http://www.phetios.com
    http://blog.nessus.nl

    MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
    "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

    "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
    "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

      IANA has reserved private IP addresses in the range of 169.254.0.0 to 169.254.255.255
      It is used for Automatic Private IP Addressing.
      Why your clients systems aren't prompting for a password I'm not sure about.

      As for using WEP even though it may be 128bit it is not very secure as there is a finite number of passwords for it. You will be much securer using WPA or WPA2 which use AES/TKIP encryptions.

      To make that even more secure you could use a random password made up of characters, symbols and numbers in both cases that is around 33 long. Making sure you don't use words.

      Regards,

      Richard

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

        WPA and WPA2 isn't very secure either...
        See this for example: http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=_TuuTCnCVOA
        If you want to make it secure use 802.1x authentication with PEAP

        you know what, When I've some time I will test it personally if I can crack it. If you see the video you see it can be done

        Also read this one : http://www.cwnp.com/community/index2...do_pdf=1&id=82
        Last edited by Dumber; 29th August 2008, 13:47.
        Marcel
        Technical Consultant
        Netherlands
        http://www.phetios.com
        http://blog.nessus.nl

        MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
        "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

        "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
        "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

          Thanks for the informaiton.

          True, WPA and WPA2 can be cracked, but from my understanding it would be a dictionary attack followed by brute force, so in theory by using a strong enough password that is long enough and random enough, any one who tried cracking it would be at it a very long time.

          I could be wrong mind you.

          Regards,

          Richard

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

            Originally posted by RAustin View Post
            Thanks for the informaiton.

            True, WPA and WPA2 can be cracked, but from my understanding it would be a dictionary attack followed by brute force, so in theory by using a strong enough password that is long enough and random enough, any one who tried cracking it would be at it a very long time.

            I could be wrong mind you.

            Regards,

            Richard
            Also, the point is it takes a while and a lot of effort. Drive down ANY residential street and you'll get dozens of unprotected networks; why bother cracking a WEP or WPA one when you can just use an unprotected one instead? I always use WPA2 and hidden SSID at home; but not because it's particularly secure... rather because it's more secure than the three or four unprotected ones I can pick up from my home!


            Tom
            For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

            Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

              Well I'm going to test it when I've some time.
              However, If you can crack a WPA2 TKIP within a few minutes why wouldn't I do it?
              Especially when it's a company it can be quite interesting. Hiding Sid won't help much. within seconds I've found a lot of information with netstumbler.

              But ok, I've to admit, at home I also use WPA2 TKIP just because it's easy and it's harder to crack then unprotected ones in my street
              Marcel
              Technical Consultant
              Netherlands
              http://www.phetios.com
              http://blog.nessus.nl

              MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
              "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

              "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
              "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

                Kathy, it sounds like they are connecting to another WAP (that doesn't assign addresses via DHCP). You can verify what WAP they are connected to by looking at the properties of the connection while it's connected.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

                  Interesting discussion. Security is my all time favrouite topic in computers.

                  People says wireless hacking,password theft, identity theft, cracking and hacking increasing these days.

                  I beleive it's becasue people dont take precaution while connected to internet.
                  Generally nobody clears cookies, history and etc frequently.
                  Most people have bad habit to save passwords.
                  I seen it if some 1ahs saved Yahoo! messenger password, after some weeks he/she starts facing trouble with PC slow down and then some weird Yahoo! toolbar is there in Add/Remove programs and Yahoomessenger.exe is modified.

                  Security is very much serious issue these days by means of over wire or wireless communication.

                  Regards,
                  Amey.
                  All in 1
                  Solaris,Linux & Windows admin + networking.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

                    Hi Kathy, when u get the 169.254 it means ur pc couldn't talk with the dhcp server.
                    It would be a good idea to start with the very basics and make sure you can connect to your wifi's ssid with no security.
                    when you have connected to your own network and are getting a valid ip address from your address pool of your dhcp server and can access the internet ect you are then ok to start building on security.
                    by enabling wep or wpa-psk
                    disabling broadcast of your ssid
                    mac address filtering.
                    ect
                    Please remember to award reputation points if you have received good advice.
                    I do tend to think 'outside the box' so others may not always share the same views.

                    MCITP -W7,
                    MCSA+Messaging, CCENT, ICND2 slowly getting around to.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

                      It's interesting that I keep hearing about SSID suppression, MAC address filtering, and static IP address assignment. These are all wireless security myths.


                      SSID suppression does nothing because that means the clients need to be configured with the SSID and THEY are just going to broadcast it out instead of the access point. In either case, it's out there for anyone to sniff.

                      MAC filtering is the same because the MAC address is transmitted over the air just like the SSID and is easily spoofed.

                      Static IP address assignment is useless because just like the MAC address, the IP address is transmited out in the air so the network can be spoofed as well.


                      What all of these solutions do is MAYBE protect your network for an additional few minutes...maybe. You can use Net Stumbler in Backtrack to find out the SSID, IP address, and MAC address just by starting the software up, no commands needed. Right there, the MAYBE aspect of protecting your network for a few more minutes goes out the window.

                      Plus, it actually causes you to spend more time in administrative overhead keeping the database up-to-date then anything.

                      There are lots of solutions but for a home or small business network, WPA/WPA2 with TKIP/AES (WPA2 w/AES prefered) with a strong, random, non-dictionary passphrase will suit you just fine. If you want to be really anal, you can use a 63 character ANSCII passphrase and put it on a encrypted usb drive. I've seen no difference in throughput when using a low character passphrase and the max (63) character passphrase. You can use the below link to generate random passphrases online via an SSL encrypted webpage:

                      https://www.grc.com/passwords.htm

                      Also, changing the passphrase AND the SSID on a regular basis helps your security as well. This is because WPA/WPA2 uses the SSID as the salt, or another method of adding complexity to encrypting communications. Basicaly, if someone is capturing wireless packets and trying to brute force them then by changing the SSID and passphrase, you have made those packets useless and they will have to start over from the absolute begining again. If you were to use SSID suppression then changing the SSID would be a chore because, instead of just informing the users what the new SSID was, you have to go to each one and configure it on their machines as well.


                      With regards to cracking WPA/WPA2, that is due to weak passphrases especially stuff you can find in the dictionary. Almost all the encryption out that uses keys and passphrases will crash and burn if those keys and phrases are weak and/or based on stuff you can find in the dictionary.

                      Another thing to keep in mind:

                      I had a friend when I was in school who was a Buffy fanatic and everytime we did equipment configurations and such that required a password, he would use something Buffy related. This is were social engineering will come in. All someone needs to do is find out about this and focus their attacks on Buffy related words and his equipment is toast. My teacher even told him if he continued to do it again, she would give him an F every time he did it. Don't be that person!

                      Well, I hope you've enjoyed my rant, happy security.

                      ***EDIT***

                      One thing I forgot to mention about the static IP address assignment is that you won't get a DHCP IP address assigned to you until you correctly authenticate with the wireless network. It makes statically assigning IP addresses kind of moot.
                      Last edited by Euphrates; 12th October 2008, 20:14.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

                        Like I said before, if you really want it secure go for IEEE 802.1x instead of wpa.
                        Start reading here:
                        http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sec....mspx?mfr=true
                        http://articles.techrepublic.com.com...1-6148579.html

                        And there are other ways to...
                        What about putting your wireless outside the firewall and use IPSEC, NAP and 802.1x VPN connections?

                        Certificates aren't crackable... yet.
                        Marcel
                        Technical Consultant
                        Netherlands
                        http://www.phetios.com
                        http://blog.nessus.nl

                        MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
                        "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

                        "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
                        "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Wi Fi Security Issue

                          Kathy, care to comment on all of this?
                          ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

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