Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Symantec Backup Exec 2010 R3

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Symantec Backup Exec 2010 R3

    Hi all

    At the risk of feeling a bit dumb, here is my predicament.

    I have used Backup Exec on quite a basic level since version 11. I know how to administer it for day to day operations, like setting up Backup Jobs, restoring files, etc.

    But I am still unclear on the "right" way of how to use this product, mainly in DR scenarios. I had one recently where the server that Backup Exec was installed would not boot due a RAID crash - that took nearly 4 days to get back up and running.

    So my clients vary slightly, some use Tape, some use External Hard Drives, but I do them all basically the same, as all of them backup similar stuff.

    -Daily backup job Mon-Fri which will contain everything (File/Exchange/SQL/System State/Shadow Copy Components)

    -Incremental Mon-Thurs, FULL on Friday

    I'm guessing that is about it for backup job setup.

    However, when it comes to anything past simply restoring an email, or file, or folder, I start to get a bit unsure.

    So say if the Server with backup exec fails for whatever reason. The way I see it, in order to access those backups, you need Backup Exec. So you need to at worst, get Windows installed and Backup Exec installed, before you can do anything.

    System State - when should you use this and what does it actually restore? All of your User Accounts, etc? Would this be restored after reinstalling Windows Server to get AD/Registry etc?

    Can someone enlighten me on their thoughts on this? I have looked at doing a Symantec course but they cost like $3,500. I've just about managed to scrape by on many occasions but I am ever aware that sooner or later I'm going to get caught out in terms of recovery...rather not play a lottery and be sure I know what I need to do.

  • #2
    Re: Symantec Backup Exec 2010 R3

    If you have the capacity and the time window I'd do a full backup every night, that means you only ever need one tape/drive to restore.

    Email: I always turn off GRT in Backup Exec, if you use Exchange and have appropriate retention policies configured you shouldn't need it. I've always found it to be flaky anyway.

    System state on a DC restores the AD database as it was at time of backup, as well as other roles such as DNS, DHCP etc. Fundamentally you should only ever want to restore the System State on your FSMO role holder or in single DC scenarios: if you have multiple DCs and one dies I would just rebuild it, DCPromo it and let it replicate. I had to do this this week, and we built a new server with the same version of Windows, patched it, installed the BE remote agent on it and then pushed the backup of C: and the System State onto it. Couple of reboots and a re-activation of Windows later it was back up, took about 2.5 hours total.

    Restoring a file is pretty straightforward, the BE wizard is fairly intuitive for that. You can install BE on a 60 day trial so it might be worth doing that on a test server and doing a few trial backup and restores.
    BSc, MCSA: Server 2008, MCSE, MCSA: Messaging, MCTS
    sigpic
    Cruachan's Blog

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Symantec Backup Exec 2010 R3

      BackupExec isn't really a DR product, it's a backup product. Sure, you can use it for DR but it's pretty cumbersome. I might suggest looking into some type of imaging product to create system images on a regular basis to get servers up and running in a timely fashion and augment that with BackupExec to bring everything current.

      I take a System State backup of every server every day. On a DC it backs up the usual System State components as well as the AD database. I use this for restoring individual user accounts and groups when needed but I wouldn't use it to restore the whole of AD. What you should have is multiple DC's. If one dies, simply delete the computer object, sieze the FSMO roles if neccessary, and build a new DC which will then acquire a copy of AD and DNS (for AD integrated DNS) from the remaining DC.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Symantec Backup Exec 2010 R3

        Thanks the both of you.

        If you have the capacity and the time window I'd do a full backup every night, that means you only ever need one tape/drive to restore.
        I'm going to change the policies for the ones I can then!

        Email: I always turn off GRT in Backup Exec, if you use Exchange and have appropriate retention policies configured you shouldn't need it. I've always found it to be flaky anyway.
        Can you elaborate on this please?

        System state on a DC restores the AD database as it was at time of backup, as well as other roles such as DNS, DHCP etc. Fundamentally you should only ever want to restore the System State on your FSMO role holder or in single DC scenarios: if you have multiple DCs and one dies I would just rebuild it, DCPromo it and let it replicate. I had to do this this week, and we built a new server with the same version of Windows, patched it, installed the BE remote agent on it and then pushed the backup of C: and the System State onto it. Couple of reboots and a re-activation of Windows later it was back up, took about 2.5 hours total.
        Ok.

        Restoring a file is pretty straightforward, the BE wizard is fairly intuitive for that. You can install BE on a 60 day trial so it might be worth doing that on a test server and doing a few trial backup and restores.
        I have about 7 clients who use Backup Exec, so no need for a trial. The simple file backup/restore I can handle, its more DR type scenarios I struggle with.

        BackupExec isn't really a DR product, it's a backup product. Sure, you can use it for DR but it's pretty cumbersome. I might suggest looking into some type of imaging product to create system images on a regular basis to get servers up and running in a timely fashion and augment that with BackupExec to bring everything current.
        What software do you recommend for imaging? And how does imaging work with RAID - I heard some imaging software has driver issues with RAID setups, meaning it cant see the logical drive to restore to? Need to be able to do it without a reboot really.

        I take a System State backup of every server every day. On a DC it backs up the usual System State components as well as the AD database. I use this for restoring individual user accounts and groups when needed but I wouldn't use it to restore the whole of AD. What you should have is multiple DC's. If one dies, simply delete the computer object, sieze the FSMO roles if neccessary, and build a new DC which will then acquire a copy of AD and DNS (for AD integrated DNS) from the remaining DC.
        Problem is my clients are not big enough to have multiple DC's, many are on SBS single server scenario etc.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Symantec Backup Exec 2010 R3

          On the Exchange section of the job configuration in Backup Exec you have the option for Granular Restore Technology (GRT). IME it doesn't work very well and requires lots of extra permissions for the Backup Exec service account.

          Exchange by default doesn't delete items right away, I think the default retention policy is 30 days, so you can restore deleted items through Exchange more simply than you can using Backup Exec.
          BSc, MCSA: Server 2008, MCSE, MCSA: Messaging, MCTS
          sigpic
          Cruachan's Blog

          Comment

          Working...
          X