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  • Computer naming conventions

    Sensible or stupid, what naming conventions do you have in use on your networks?
    Gareth Howells

    BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

    Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

    Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

    "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

  • #2
    Re: Computer naming conventions

    This really annoys me. On our servers we have gone from a system which we found extremely useful (see below) to a system a chimp could tell you was crap.

    The old system was:

    DDDSSSSXRRRnn

    D=Domain; S=Site (or VSVR for a virtual box); X is S for Server, R for RSA card; R is the role and nn was a number.

    SO

    CORSWDCSADC01 and CORSWDCSADC02 would both be in the CORP domain, both would be in the SherWood Data Centre, both are Servers, and both are Active Directory Controllers.

    Easy once you get used to it; LOTS of information there.

    The new system is:

    XRnnnnn

    X=S for Server; R=D for Domain Controller, M for Messaging; nnnnn is a number.

    For instance; SD00101 is a domain controller.


    Tom
    For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

    Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

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    • #3
      Re: Computer naming conventions

      Useful

      At the company I work for, as opposed to clients I do contract work for, we have around 30 desktops and 2 laptops. They all have a reserved IP through DHCP, and the hostname is XYYY - where X is C for computer, L for laptop, P for printer or S for switch, and YYY is the last octet of the IP address. When I first started, the machines were all named based on whichever convention was in use when they were bought, including the name of the department, the name of the user it was bought for (which dates back to before there was a domain in place, and therefore no fileserver) or just a random number.

      The physical servers are paired to NAS devices, and are named in pairs. Morpork backs up onto ankh (anyone a Terry Pratchett fan?) and sbssrv (old server, to be replaced next tax year) backs up onto krull.

      There was also a secondary mail server (recently decommissioned) called Mail2... exciting

      There's a pair of virtual servers running on morpork as well called bulk and skull which are destined to become the application servers (SharePoint on bulk, Debian & Tomcat on skull).

      The domain name is the company initials.
      Gareth Howells

      BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

      Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

      Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

      "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

      "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Computer naming conventions

        Sounds like the Bursar named the servers Got one named Hex?

        Last place I worked had a ton of remote offices. Each computer was named like so:

        AAA-BCCCCCCCCCCCC

        AAA = 3 or 4 letter name of office
        B = user's first initial
        C = user's last name
        ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Computer naming conventions

          I am a firm believer that random is a convention.
          "...if I turn out to be particularly clear, you've probably misunderstood what I've said” - Alan Greenspan

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Computer naming conventions

            For servers:
            S..SR..RN(V)
            S..S = site(Typically 3 chars), R..R = role (length varies e.g. DC, Mail, BES
            N = number
            Opt V for virtual
            so GroupDC2V, KAZFile1

            For clients:
            SSS_II_TYPE_OS
            SSS = site
            II = users initials
            TYPE = Desk, Lap, Tab
            OS = XP or Vista
            So CYP_AB_LAP_XP
            Of course, when users leave, do I change the name?

            For printers:
            SSS_LOC_MAKE_Q
            SSS = Site
            LOC = Location e.g. ACC, REC -- not always 3 characters
            Make = printer make
            Q = Colour or Mono (I set up separate print queues for each)


            (btw, please dont tell me the underscore is not an approved character -- it works!_
            Tom Jones
            MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
            PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
            IT Trainer / Consultant
            Ossian Ltd
            Scotland

            ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

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            • #7
              Re: Computer naming conventions

              random names from cartoons, tv shows, books, etc.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Computer naming conventions

                My parents machines etc on the network at their house are all named after stars (network devices) and planets (computers).

                In my flat, hostnames are all from classical Greece. Desktops are named after legendary characters (Hercules, Circe etc), laptops are the great minds (Socrates, Thucydides etc), servers are named after gods and devices after places of significance.

                At my mum's office that I manage the network for, everything is named after organ stops. I'm not just an IT geek
                Gareth Howells

                BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

                Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

                Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

                "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

                "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Computer naming conventions

                  At a place I worked for the servers were named after dances
                  salsa, rumba, foxtrot, tango ect
                  And the workstations were named after stars and constellations

                  My current place is
                  domain,site,type,number
                  Please remember to award reputation points if you have received good advice.
                  I do tend to think 'outside the box' so others may not always share the same views.

                  MCITP -W7,
                  MCSA+Messaging, CCENT, ICND2 slowly getting around to.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Computer naming conventions

                    I have a customer, whos servers and workstations have animalnames. Quite confusing.

                    There is only 2 servers and 5 workstations in their office, but is it easier for me to remember names like ie. sbs or server (the dc), and ts for the terminalserver.
                    Best regards,
                    Carsten.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Computer naming conventions

                      All our servers are the site name then what it is e.g. EDINBURGH-DC01 is a DC in Edinburgh.

                      Client machines are the first 3 letters of the site then the users first name and then the first 2 letters of the surname e.g. EDI-WULLIE-BU.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Computer naming conventions

                        In the school I worked at for a while, there were 2 domains in 2 forests with a one way trust, on the same subnet. With DHCP in both domains. No, I was not around when that was set up

                        Servers were named server-xx or schoolserver-xx depending on their domain (staff or pupil). Workstations and staff laptops were named x-yyy-zz - x being p or s (pupil or staff), yyy being the location (workstations) or model (laptops) and xx being a number.

                        Then they got a new network manager in, who renamed all the pupl machines to p-xxx-yyy where xxx was the MAC address and yyy was the motherboard serial number... why

                        We flattened that system when one of the servers crapped itself and moved to a single domain. Part of that involved rationalising the naming convention. Servers are now named based on their function (there's 9 of them). Workstations are named as room-#, laptops are named xL# where x is a single letter to indicate the manufacturer and model.
                        Gareth Howells

                        BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

                        Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

                        Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

                        "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

                        "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

                        Comment

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