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Dual NIC card advantage?

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  • Dual NIC card advantage?

    I am currently running a Win Server 2003 R2 out of my home, with both webhosting (through IIS 6.0) and email (IPSwitch Imail server). Would there be any advantage to putting in a dual NIC card and having the web traffic go through one, and the email / FTP traffic go through another?
    They keep getting younger, don't they baby...

    Compaq Presario PC: Windows Server 2003 R2 Standard / Intel Celeron 2.6 ghz / 1 gb RAM
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  • #2
    Re: Dual NIC card advantage?

    How much traffic you expecting?

    If it's just personal mail and website then I wouldn't bother. You could look into trying to team the nics instead incase one ever goes down.

    Michael
    Michael Armstrong
    www.m80arm.co.uk
    MCITP: EA, MCTS, MCSE 2003, MCSA 2003: Messaging, CCA, VCP 3.5, 4, 5, VCAP5-DCD, VCAP5-DCA, ITIL, MCP, PGP Certified Technician

    ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points sigpic where appropriate **

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    • #3
      Re: Dual NIC card advantage?

      I see no advantage to separating the traffic as even in the busiest corporate environment, you would be hard pressed to saturate a GB link. As for teaming, I used to do this and think that it was a good idea but recently I've changed my opinion. If I have a faulty or flaky NIC I want to know about it and teaming can sometimes mask a NIC problem and make it more difficult to track down the cause of network problems. I have unteamed all my NIC's.

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      • #4
        Re: Dual NIC card advantage?

        Originally posted by joeqwerty View Post
        If I have a faulty or flaky NIC I want to know about it and teaming can sometimes mask a NIC problem and make it more difficult to track down the cause of network problems. I have unteamed all my NIC's.
        Suppose it depends on how mission critical the site / mail server is. On a home website / mail server I don't suppose it's going to be too critical

        Michael
        Michael Armstrong
        www.m80arm.co.uk
        MCITP: EA, MCTS, MCSE 2003, MCSA 2003: Messaging, CCA, VCP 3.5, 4, 5, VCAP5-DCD, VCAP5-DCA, ITIL, MCP, PGP Certified Technician

        ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points sigpic where appropriate **

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        • #5
          Re: Dual NIC card advantage?

          Thanks again. I happened to see on on craigslist for 10 bucks (I always keep an eye open for random deals) and wondered if it would be worth it.

          The card in question was a single card with 2 NIC openings (as opposed to two separate cards). I wasn't sure if separating the traffic (which isn't all that much) would help the router or the server at all.
          They keep getting younger, don't they baby...

          Compaq Presario PC: Windows Server 2003 R2 Standard / Intel Celeron 2.6 ghz / 1 gb RAM
          HP m7470n Media Center PC: Windows XP Pro Media Center 2005 / AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4200+ 2.19 ghz / 2 gb RAM
          Toshiba Satellite M35 Special Edition: Windows XP Pro SP2 / Intel Pentium M 1.70 ghz / 1 gb RAM
          Gateway FMC-901 Media Center PC Windows XP Pro Media Center 2005 / Intel Pentium 4 3.0 ghz / 512 mb RAM

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          • #6
            Re: Dual NIC card advantage?

            Being a home server, I would first check what is the bandwith you have available on your home connection. Is it DSL? Or ADSL? Is it some kind of cable connection?
            How much upload and how much download you have from your ISP?
            If you get two NICs for load-balancing purposes and you set them up to 100Mb Full Duplex, you can reach 400Mbps. Can your connection give you that? If not, there's no reason to do it from the first place.
            I am not aware of any solution that can let you set which application uses which NIC. You can bind different clients and protocols to different NICs, but when both use TCP/IP, it cannot be done (AFAIK).
            At most, you can team them up for fault-tolerance purposes, like Michael said.

            Sorin Solomon


            In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
            -

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            • #7
              Re: Dual NIC card advantage?

              It's a business-class cable connection, so I get about 7-8 mg down and 1-2 mg up. There's never been a limit placed on my bandwidth (in aggregate. I'm sure there's a peak limit at any given time)

              As for separating the traffic, I assumed (perhaps incorrectly) that each NIC slot would have a different MAC address and thus could be assigned a different IP address at the router level, and then each program using that (IIS, IMail, etc) would be set up to correlate to that pre-set IP.

              From everyone's comments here (which I appreciate, since I'm a self-taught newbie), it doesn't seem to be worth the effort
              Last edited by Norcross; 12th January 2008, 15:02. Reason: Additional info
              They keep getting younger, don't they baby...

              Compaq Presario PC: Windows Server 2003 R2 Standard / Intel Celeron 2.6 ghz / 1 gb RAM
              HP m7470n Media Center PC: Windows XP Pro Media Center 2005 / AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 4200+ 2.19 ghz / 2 gb RAM
              Toshiba Satellite M35 Special Edition: Windows XP Pro SP2 / Intel Pentium M 1.70 ghz / 1 gb RAM
              Gateway FMC-901 Media Center PC Windows XP Pro Media Center 2005 / Intel Pentium 4 3.0 ghz / 512 mb RAM

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Dual NIC card advantage?

                Originally posted by Norcross View Post
                It's a business-class cable connection, so I get about 7-8 mg down and 1-2 mg up.
                Not bad for a home connection, but not enough to really enjoy the advantages of two NICs (IMHO).

                Sorin Solomon


                In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
                -

                Comment

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