Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SSD Drives

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • SSD Drives

    Some have suggested though SSD drive are more reliable and faster than usual Hard drives, Windows Defragmenters can cause damage to them. Is this true?

    If so would it be safer to use https://www.piriform.com/defraggler which I do find will defragment ordinary drives far better and display far more information in the process?

  • #2
    Re: SSD Drives

    You wouldn't want to run the defragger all the time... actually you may not want to run it at all as it really shouldn't be needed on an SSD. A defragger puts the data physically in a sequential layout on the drive. But since random reads are pretty much the same as sequential. But the amount of "damage" from a defrag is miniscule to the drive.

    The "damage" is that each cell on the SSD has a certain life span and can only be written a certain number of times. Every time you write data to a cell it wears down some of the insulation. Reading doesn't wear the insulation at all.
    Regards,
    Jeremy

    Network Consultant/Engineer
    Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
    www.gma-cpa.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: SSD Drives

      http://www.engadget.com/2014/12/05/s...bytes-of-data/

      It does seem that SSDs are proving to be more reliable and durable than traditional hard drives, which is to be expected given the lack of moving parts.

      I can't imagine you are going to get any significant performance benefits from defragging SSDs regularly though.
      BSc, MCSA: Server 2008, MCSE, MCSA: Messaging, MCTS
      sigpic
      Cruachan's Blog

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: SSD Drives

        As a test I defragged a USB key several years ago. Not only did it take an eternity, there was no discernible performance difference after this action.

        I was looking at the Samsung 850 Pro SSD that has a 10 year warranty and noticed it also has a 150 TBW (Total Bytes Written) part to the warranty. I haven't seen what the 150TBW means but it does say that it is shown in the Samsung Magician Software that comes with the SSD. Sounds a bit like a new car warranty: 5 years or 100,000km whichever comes first.

        So, defragging an SSD would really eat into those TBWs due to the amount of writing that takes place in defragmentation.
        1 1 was a racehorse.
        2 2 was 1 2.
        1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
        2 2 1 1 2

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: SSD Drives

          One other point is it just a simple matter to connect a SSD to any PC as it only needs to be plugged into the Data port? The normal drive power lead will never been needed.

          Also is it safe to buy SSD and have it delivered by post, as presumably it is not so vulnerable to physical shock as a standard Hard Drive.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: SSD Drives

            Gordon,
            the SSD is exactly the same as any other drive - just plug in a sata cable. It will need power - if on a laptop, the power will be part of the connector, if a desktop a separate SATA power lead will be needed
            I have not had problems with spinning hard drives in the post for many years, but you are right, no major risk with an SSD
            Tom Jones
            MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
            PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
            IT Trainer / Consultant
            Ossian Ltd
            Scotland

            ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: SSD Drives

              Thanks.

              Forgive my ignorance but by a SATA cable do you mean exactly the same pin plugs needed for a Hard Drive. Only the connector for such as below appears to need a ribbon cable not female pin plugs.

              http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Samsung-MZ...item3399fd0538

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: SSD Drives

                Yes - exactly the same plugs. On the linked e(vil)bay image there are two connectors - the narrow one is the data cable, the wider one is the power

                As far as the interfaces go, it is exactly the same as a SATA hard drive - the differences are all inside the box

                Are you fitting it to a laptop or a desktop?
                Tom Jones
                MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
                PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
                IT Trainer / Consultant
                Ossian Ltd
                Scotland

                ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: SSD Drives

                  If I do go ahead it will be for an old Desktop

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: SSD Drives

                    OK so you will need to check the desktop supports SATA drives (and how fast the SATA interface is as older, slower SATA1 or 2 will negate some of the benefits of the SSD.

                    You will need SATA data cables - typically red with a 1cm (approx.) wide L shaped socket at the ends and power cables (as above but about 2cm wide

                    Since SSDs are all laptop sized (2.5 inch) drives, you will also need a 2.5 to 3.5 inch adaptor to fit it securely in a drive bay (alternatively relying on the lack of moving parts and consequently less vibration than a HDD, you could consider blue-tack or duct-tape to secure the drive
                    Tom Jones
                    MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
                    PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
                    IT Trainer / Consultant
                    Ossian Ltd
                    Scotland

                    ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: SSD Drives

                      Originally posted by biggles77 View Post
                      So, defragging an SSD would really eat into those TBWs due to the amount of writing that takes place in defragmentation.
                      I imagine it would be per cell since 150b would be met when you write anything to the drive. If it's per cell then a defrag would increment this by 1 or 2. And wear leveling should distribute the writes evenly across the cells over time. Should be minimal impact. But like you said, no need on an SSD.
                      Regards,
                      Jeremy

                      Network Consultant/Engineer
                      Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
                      www.gma-cpa.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: SSD Drives

                        You need to actually think about what a defrag is doing.

                        Disk defragmentation is the process of consolidating fragmented data on a volume (such as a hard disk or a storage device) so it will work more efficiently.

                        Fragmentation happens to a volume over time as you save, change, or delete files. The changes that you save to a file are often stored in a different place on the volume than the original file. This doesn't change where the file appears in Windows—only where the bits of information that make up the file are stored on the actual volume. Over time, both the file and the volume itself become fragmented, and your computer slows down as it has to look in different places to open a single file.

                        Disk Defragmenter is a tool that rearranges the data on your volume and reunites fragmented data so your computer can run more efficiently. In this version of Windows, Disk Defragmenter runs on a schedule so you don't have to remember to run it, although you can still run it manually or change the schedule it uses.
                        http://windows.microsoft.com/en-au/w...#1TC=windows-7

                        Perfect for a platter disk as the heads need to move on the platter to collect the data at the locations it is stored. Defragging gets around this by moving the data so it is contiguous. An SSD doesn't have platter so has no need for this type of operation.

                        I've never used a defragger on any SSD drive i've had. There are no benefits to it.

                        http://www.pcworld.com/article/20475...-your-ssd.html

                        https://revision3.com/tekzillabites/...frag-your-ssd/

                        http://helpdeskgeek.com/featured-pos...defrag-an-ssd/

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X