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  • UK Fibre Broadband

    To probably show what a terrible state the ancient overhead phone lines are here in Hastings UK, though I have now been connected to so called fast fibre of up to 38 Mbps arranged by EE, the initial speed is only about 19 Mbps. Yet the magic green WI-FI box is only about 200 yards away. Never being involved in downloading in such as massive albums of heavy Rock music , DVDs, playing games, or watching TV online the 38 Mbps package is ample fast enough even at 19 Mbps. In fact the only reason I eventually succumbed to fibre is as seems to be happening to others, the speed of my standard broadband dropped from over 3 Mbps to just under 2 Mbps for some strange reason.

    EE advise me to leave the new router below powered on all the time for 10 days, though I see no increase in speed so far after 24 hours. Is there any evidence in general the speeds do tend to increase if the router is left powered on all the time for say 10 days?

    http://ee.co.uk/help/phones-and-devi...ireless-router

  • #2
    Re: UK Fibre Broadband

    Assuming fibre broadband works the same way as ADSL (I don't know if this is true or not) there is a "training period" where the exchange will adjust the line speed to find the best combination of speed and reliability. This takes hours or days and if you power off your router, it starts again.

    19Mb/sec - you lucky so-and-so
    Some of us have to live with 5, and no sign of fibre (to the cabinet or the house) any time soon
    Tom Jones
    MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
    PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
    IT Trainer / Consultant
    Ossian Ltd
    Scotland

    ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: UK Fibre Broadband

      As Ossian says there is a few days or even weeks of bedding in. I've got BT FTTC and I think it was around 2 weeks before I got the advertised 40mbps.

      The UK's phone network was never designed for this though, the "copper" is not exactly pure so until FTTP akes off a lot of people won't get the full advertised speeds.
      BSc, MCSA: Server 2008, MCSE, MCSA: Messaging, MCTS
      sigpic
      Cruachan's Blog

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      • #4
        Re: UK Fibre Broadband

        Someone is claiming he was told the speed of fibre maybe reduced if you have more than on phone with extensions in use. I even have a little separate caller display box with one phone

        I am not prepared to keep running into another room every time the phone rings, but I might be prepared to remove one phone out of three, if there is any truth in the claim.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: UK Fibre Broadband

          Never heard that one, although it sounds as if it is related to Microfilters (which should be fitted to every phone socket in use - and IMHO even if not in use)

          You could always use a cordless phone (beware black helicopters )
          Tom Jones
          MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
          PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
          IT Trainer / Consultant
          Ossian Ltd
          Scotland

          ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: UK Fibre Broadband

            Microfilters are not required with VDSL, or at least not with BT. When I got Infinity installed they sent an engineer to replace my master socket with a new one that has both an RJ11 socket and the standard BT phone socket.

            There used to be a thing about checking the REN (Ring Equivalence Number) of your phones and devices - if it was greater than 4 in total then you could have issues although that may be from back in the dial-up days. It's not something I've heard of for a long time.
            BSc, MCSA: Server 2008, MCSE, MCSA: Messaging, MCTS
            sigpic
            Cruachan's Blog

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            • #7
              Re: UK Fibre Broadband

              Is "fibre" different than "fiber"? If not, then there should be no "training" required. DSL has the training due to it being an analog signal and the that potential bandwidth is linked directly to the distance from the POP and the quality of the copper it's run over.

              If it's fiber then I believe it's just the cable and the transceivers... and what they limit you to (or who you share the link with).

              Anyhoo, have you tried doing a speed test while plugged directly into the router? Wireless performance could account for the 5Mb difference.
              Regards,
              Jeremy

              Network Consultant/Engineer
              Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
              www.gma-cpa.com

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              • #8
                Re: UK Fibre Broadband

                Jeremy, in the UK it is often Fibre "Fiber" to the Cabinet (FTTC) so there is a fast connection to a street box shared between a small number (100-ish) copper lines and the data is delivered the final couple of hundred metres "meters" over them - it is not a direct fibre connection to the house (that is FTTP - Fibre to the Premises - which is rarer than hens teeth here)
                Tom Jones
                MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
                PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
                IT Trainer / Consultant
                Ossian Ltd
                Scotland

                ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: UK Fibre Broadband

                  Ah, I see. Thanks Tom!
                  Regards,
                  Jeremy

                  Network Consultant/Engineer
                  Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
                  www.gma-cpa.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: UK Fibre Broadband

                    My neighbor is a BT engineer. What I've learned is that, for the best speed, ADSL or FTTC, your 'Master Socket' should be the first socket in the house, and where the router plugs it's phone line into. Any other phone sockets in the house should be ganged off from that master.

                    We re-wired my house so that the first socket is in the upstairs room now used as my office; all other sockets are down-line from there (total of 3). ADSL2 wasn't bad at all once FTTC went in (better than 18Mbps) just because of the clean connections when the new street cabinet went in. Then I took the plunge to replace my ADSL with FTTC, and have had 45+Mbps reliably ever since.

                    And I'm in Lincolnshire.
                    *RicklesP*
                    MSCA (2003/XP), Security+, CCNA

                    ** Remember: credit where credit is due, and reputation points as appropriate **

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                    • #11
                      Re: UK Fibre Broadband

                      For those interested my router is
                      http://ee.co.uk/help/phones-and-devi...ireless-router

                      So a BT engineer did not now need to visit me to install and extra BT modem.

                      I presume we in Hastings and Bexhill are not the only places where the phone lines are so poor, that fibre broadband has to be connected to umpteen little BT green WI-FI cabinet around town. Is there a way of finding out which cabinet I am connected? Since I pay EE for my Landline as well as Broadband I am unable to contact BT for such as testing or removal of noise on the lines etc. I never risk using Wireless to connect to a PC etc only Ethernet cable.

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                      • #12
                        Re: UK Fibre Broadband

                        Gordon, if you use a laptop then I would toss the cable and use the wireless. I have multiple laptops, tablets and phones running on my wireless and I use a WPA2 key generator to make a fairly good key. Putting it on iPads and iPhones can be a pain but for everything else I use a USB flash drive with the key in a txt file. Simple and quite secure.

                        Cables give me the shits and that is why I don't eat them.
                        1 1 was a racehorse.
                        2 2 was 1 2.
                        1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                        2 2 1 1 2

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                        • #13
                          Re: UK Fibre Broadband

                          Being 81 etc on my own with no transport, I only use patched up old free laptops to show PPS and DVDs etc at club meetings on a big TV kindly provided by the landlords of the room we hire. I seldom go out for long so I rarely need my old Mobile.

                          I only use a couple of Desktops both within a metre of my router. This one with the dreaded Win 7 and the old one with dear old Win XP. If need to go online with the XP I just use Firefox instead of the old risky IE. I refuse to buy a new USB printer and scanner when the old ones still work ok on XP just to please Win 7.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: UK Fibre Broadband

                            What version of Windows 7 do you have Gordon? If Professional or Ultimate you could install XPMode and have the printer run from the Virtual XP machine install on Windows 7.

                            What are the hardware specifications of the Windows 7 machine and what do you not like about it? Just curious, that's all. The one thing that has annoyed me about Windows 7 is some of the software I liked to use will not run on it anymore. Guess I should have installed a 32 bit version instead of the 64 bit one.
                            1 1 was a racehorse.
                            2 2 was 1 2.
                            1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                            2 2 1 1 2

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: UK Fibre Broadband

                              Being just an Amateur I am only on Win 7 Home Premium.

                              Four things that annoy me about Win 7 in particular I do not seem to be able to avoid all unlike Win XP

                              All the folder have to be the same size.

                              When I try to find a file to attach to in Windows Mail or want to save an attachment if I click on a file on the right the display of that window it changes the layout before I can use the file.

                              If I try to copy and paste a URL from a web page to a new email with Windows Mail it crashes Windows Mail

                              Because Win 7 insists on reading some sort of data from any sort of Flash Drive the first time it is plugged in again, it takes much longer than Win XP to display the contents.

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