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  • Changing network IP class

    Hello, we're changing from a 10.1.x.x address scheme to a 192.168.x.x scheme to facilitate an upgrade of our server hardware/software. We've got some devices like printers and NAS devices that you can only change the IP through a web interface. My question is in regards to what order I should make the necessary changes. Do I change the IP addresses on the devices before it is changed on the router when I still have access to the web based config pages. Or, do I change the router first and then change the devices? If router first, should I still be able to access the web interface through the old IP address or will it then be inaccessible? Probably a silly question but I've never had to do this before.

  • #2
    Re: Changing network IP class

    Routing will only come into play when you are trying to access a device not on your subnet. So say if a printer is not on your local subnet and you change the ip on the printer first then you will loose access it to it until the router/switch is changed over. Normally I would not change remote networks remotely as you may loose access to those devices when changing ip's. I prefer to be on a host that is on that local subnet. You are going to loose access to either one temporarily so imo it really doesn't matter where you start. I prefer to get routing up and working first as if the data plane isn't working then the rest is mute. Then I would work on the hosts etc. As long as you have your new ip scheme planned out downtime will be minimal baring any other issues that come up.
    CCNA, CCNA-Security, CCNP
    CCIE Security (In Progress)

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    • #3
      Re: Changing network IP class

      Assuming I change the router's IP from 10.1.1.1 to 192.168.8.1 - How will I then access the configuration webpages for the printers in question? Will I need the installation software to reconfigure them or will there be some other way to access them?

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      • #4
        Re: Changing network IP class

        1. Your connection to your network devices shouldn't be going through the router so after you change the router ip address you should still be able to connect to the other devices just like you do now.

        2. If you lose your connection to anything because you've changed it's ip address then simply change your ip address to match the changed ip address address range and you'll then be able to connect to it. For example, if you change the router ip address to 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 then change your ip address to 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0. You can do this for both network ranges. Give yourself an ip address in the appropriate ip address range for the device you're configuring.

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        • #5
          Re: Changing network IP class

          Originally posted by noRulez43 View Post
          Assuming I change the router's IP from 10.1.1.1 to 192.168.8.1 - How will I then access the configuration webpages for the printers in question? Will I need the installation software to reconfigure them or will there be some other way to access them?
          This has already been implied but, will you be on the local subnet when making the changes? If so then I would:

          - On your workstation set a static IP address on the NIC and add a secondary IP address on the new subnet
          - Make the changes to the router/firewall
          - Make the changes to switches, printers, other network devices

          With configuring your workstation with IP addresses on both subnets you won't have to be changing back and forth and you can test each change you make right away.
          Regards,
          Jeremy

          Network Consultant/Engineer
          Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
          www.gma-cpa.com

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          • #6
            Re: Changing network IP class

            Forgot to add,if you have remote networks (IE in different locations) it helps to have another person helping out, one person on each side of the circuit. Makes things a lot easier.
            CCNA, CCNA-Security, CCNP
            CCIE Security (In Progress)

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