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  • network traffic question

    Hello,

    I know that the question is not directly related to Server and is more networking... but I decided that this subforum is the closest where I can ask the question.

    Q:
    What happens in a switch when transferring big chunk of data from Sever A to Server B. Servers connected to the same switch.

    Theoretically, the data travelling path will be inside of the switch and will be port to port. Would it take backplane bandwidth?

    Thanks.
    "When you hit a wrong note it's the next note that makes it good or bad". Miles Davis

  • #2
    Re: network traffic question

    Probably better in a network forum so moved...
    Tom Jones
    MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
    PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
    IT Trainer / Consultant
    Ossian Ltd
    Scotland

    ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

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    • #3
      Re: network traffic question

      Sure it would. Backplane bandwidth is a shared bus usually between line cards on the higher end switches (Cisco 6500's). Backplane bandwidth is measured in bps. Fixed chassis switches like the 3750's have no line cards so the backplane bandwidth is shared between the ports . Throughput is the maximum rate in which the device can process the packets and is measured in pps. (packets per second) Don't confuse the two. With modular chassis switches that support line cards, depending on the platfrom, traffic switched within the line card may not use any backplane bandwidth at all as the processing has been off-loaded to the line card itself.
      Last edited by auglan; 13th September 2012, 18:12.
      CCNA, CCNA-Security, CCNP
      CCIE Security (In Progress)

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      • #4
        Re: network traffic question

        Thank you very much!
        "When you hit a wrong note it's the next note that makes it good or bad". Miles Davis

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