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  • Blocking faster Broadband

    I may have hinted at this problem before here. I have been warned by a representative of my server over the phone, that if I do not agree to a new package, they will block me receiving any faster Broadband above the small 2.2 Bps I now get, when faster broadband comes to much of Hastings later this year, thanks to help from the Government.

    Can a server do this to an individual customer? I am too old at 78 to risk committing myself to a 12 months or more contract, along with health problems not knowing whether I will still be in a fit state to use a PC in the near future. If it turns out to be true I will have to transfer to a new ‘ no contract server ‘ even if I have to pay for a new Router.

  • #2
    Re: Blocking faster Broadband

    I'm fairly sure all they can do is prevent you from getting it with them.
    Even though, I doubt they would. Sounds like someone thinkin 'this guy's old, I'll put the hard sell on him"

    it probably depends on how your service is delivered at present, and how the "fast" broadband would be delivered
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    • #3
      Re: Blocking faster Broadband

      Below is the officail announcement if of any use. I hear rumours BT will not attempt to replace many of the old lines, some are even of aluminium. Instead they are supposed to be installaiing antennas on cabinets as relays !

      -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Slow connection speeds put Hastings on broadband blacklist Published on Saturday 20 August 2011 16:00 HASTINGS is among the worst broadband blackspots in the UK, a new survey has revealed. The slow connection speeds put the town among the 20 worst areas, according to the survey by uSwitch.com published on Wednesday. The average download speed for Hastings is 2.25 megabits a second, more than eight times slower than Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, which is recorded as having the fastest broadband speeds in the country, at 18.87 megabits a second. A study by the telecoms regulator Ofcom found that in May 2011, the average broadband speed in the UK was 6.8 megabits a second. This puts Hastings well below average. Things are set to improve markedly however, with the arrival of superfast broadband. As reported in the Observer in June, BT is working to install high-speed internet for 61,000 homes across Hastings and Eastbourne, and it is hoped that this will be completed next year. It was announced on Tuesday that East Sussex will get more than £10.6 million to help secure better broadband, as part of a £363 million investment by the Government to ensure super-fast broadband is available across the UK by 2015. Following the upgrade, download speeds of up to 100 megabits a second will be a possibility, which is up to 50 times faster than the current speeds experienced by many. At 100 megabits a second, it would take just two seconds to download a song, and only 10 minutes to download a full length high-definition film

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      • #4
        Re: Blocking faster Broadband

        Why would you not want to go to a new package?
        I presume the price will probably be similar to what you are paying now?
        Tom Jones
        MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
        PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
        IT Trainer / Consultant
        Ossian Ltd
        Scotland

        ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

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        • #5
          Re: Blocking faster Broadband

          I agree, but they claim it was a condition of my current old package that the speed would never be higher than 2 Mbps as below, although even my current old USB Modem is rated to handle up to 7 Mps. I have a new router anyway ready to try one day, and even ready for Win7.

          -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          Your current home package is:
          Home Starter - £12.00 a month, up to 2 Meg speed, Modem, 6GB usage allowance and inclusive evening and weekend landline telephone calls
          You can change to:
          etc etc

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          • #6
            Re: Blocking faster Broadband

            Sounds like what I went thru a year ago in Lincolnshire! By all means, drop your current ISP. Simply shop around for a new deal (Plusnet from Yorkshire are advertising a lot just now), then tell your old ISP you want a MAC code to move your service. They CANNOT refuse to give it to you, it is illegal. They may even agree to upgrade your service rather than lose your custom. Either way, you're better off.
            *RicklesP*
            MSCA (2003/XP), Security+, CCNA

            ** Remember: credit where credit is due, and reputation points as appropriate **

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            • #7
              Re: Blocking faster Broadband

              Thanks I agree. As I have no need of a Wireless router I would only have to pay Plusnet £20 for a LAN one and not be bound by a contract.

              But at the speed it will take BT to install the faster Broadband for some here, it may take 12 months. So in case I can avoid all the hassle of informing umpteen not to use the servers email address anymore, I will and see if they do really block an increase in speed. I am booked for BT to inform me when the speeds will be increased.

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              • #8
                Re: Blocking faster Broadband

                Originally posted by Gordon
                although even my current old USB Modem is rated to handle up to 7 Mps
                7MBps is not even full ADSL (1) speed so I would imagine the USB modem will not be compatible with the 100MBps speeds hence they will unlikely be able to supply you with the faster speed unless you change your "plan" and hardware.
                1 1 was a racehorse.
                2 2 was 1 2.
                1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                2 2 1 1 2

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                • #9
                  Re: Blocking faster Broadband

                  Thanks for the warning. Sometime I will try to setup the Edimax router I bought awhile ago, which is even ready for Win 7. I assume the Speed checks available on some sites will indicate the faster speeds once available, even if I could use the extra speed.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Blocking faster Broadband

                    I was thinking I do not think the inability of my ancient Speedtouch USB modem to handle the fantasy 100 Mbps Broadband supposed to come to here by the end of this year will bother me. I have yet to see hardly a TV advert by any server claim they are capable of providing any thing more than ‘ up to 20 Mbs ‘ if only for the simple reason very few of them are able to initially pump more than 20 Mbps down the line to any BT main Exchange.

                    It appears the very few servers that do boast about higher speeds are only able to do so because for some reason in a few certain areas they have forked out £millions to lay down their own cables. That is something I very much doubt any will ever be prepared to do in a depressed area like here.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Blocking faster Broadband

                      I very much doubt you could max out your present 7mbps device on any single sight now. The benefit is that you can connect to several sites, say 20, and download at their full speed. With my ADSL2+ connection, I can download from Adobe, Apple, Symantec and Microsoft at 1.22mbps from any ONE of those listed. With a 100mbps connection, I could get that speed from 4 sites at once and still have capacity to download from several other sites at the same time. The above 4 may deliver at higher speed but that is the limit of my connection but I would imagine they will have a limit at what the max speed is that you can grab stuff from them.

                      Perhaps you forget that faster broadband doesn't just being able to download more stuff from websites. I watch some TV episodes online. With a faster connection I will be able to download a higher resolution of the episode. I would also consider that businesses use the Internet as well. Being able to transfer bigger files at a faster speed would be a major benefit for them.

                      To put this perspective, consider the telephone. When I was younger, not everyone had a telephone in their house or like us had a party line (a nice way to learn morse code). If you wanted to talk to someone it was down to the red box and press Button A when they answered (or B if they didn't). If it was Button B then you went home and tried again later. Fast forward to today. You call their mobile and if they don't answer it leaves a message or your number and the time you called so all you have to do is wait for a return call or you send them an SMS. I don't think anyone would want to go back to having to press the Button A or B times but I am sure not many thought that we would all be carrying round an instant communication device that is often glued to the carriers ear. Does this mean we should have stayed in Button A and B land or embraced the new technology and think what possibilities it could be used for.

                      When I was in school, the hardware I now work with hadn't been invented, maybe not even thought about. Same with the software. My mobile phone has a more powerful processor, vastly more memory and storage capacity than my first clone PC that I purchased 20 years ago. Hell, I could still be using the 286/12 for typing emails and Word documents.

                      I will make a prediction. In 5 to 7 years time, 100mbps connections will be viewed like slow ADSL connections (anything under 8mbps) are today. A fairly safe prediction me thinks. A new optic cable is being layed between OZ and NZ. It will be capable of 6tbps and 2 years after that 18tbps. New electronics will boost that to 100+tbps withing 5 years. If you build new roads it doesn't take long before they are clogged with traffic. Broadband is after all the Internet Super Highway so the more bandwidth available the more it will get filled up. I just hope the bloody spam gets killed off and so frees up a huge amount of wasted bandwidth.

                      And if you live in a depressed area, maybe you will get high speed Prozac Bandwidth.
                      1 1 was a racehorse.
                      2 2 was 1 2.
                      1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                      2 2 1 1 2

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                      • #12
                        Re: Blocking faster Broadband

                        Thanks I am sure you are right. But my point is at the present moment very few servers are advertising on their sites or on TV offering more than the usual phrase ' up to 20 Mbps ' !!

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