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How to figure bandwidth limits

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  • How to figure bandwidth limits

    Hi,

    I'm trying to figure out this bandwidth issue and hope someone will have some thoughts on setting.

    Have a network that is divided into a public side and private side. The public side is set up using wireless access points. Currently there are between 50-125 users that can connect to these devices. Have a router which has a limit rule set for the public network side @ 20M/2M. We only want them to be able to view a webpage, maybe check email but not doing heavy up/downloading/streaming huge amounts of data.

    What I'd like to know is what would be good up/down bandwidth limits (i.e. 512kb, 1024kb,etc.) to set on the access points themselves to limit each user?

    Thanks for the help.

  • #2
    WAPs don't evenly divide the bandwidth as each user connects. If 1 user is on an AP then they get 100%. If you add a second user then user 1 may keep 60% and user 2 gets 40%. Add a third users and user 1 drops to 50%, user 2 to 30% and user 3 gets 20% of available bandwidth. This is a very rough theoretical description and I do have to qualify this with saying that my Cisco WAP training was over 2 years ago so things may have changed but that is my understanding of the load distribution (assuming it is still the same).

    Our option was to restrict user bandwidth using a Wireless Controller.
    How many WAPs do you have?
    How many users do you imagine would be connecting to each AP?
    Will the users be static or roam between APs?
    What bandwidth are the APs capable of handling?
    There was a box that was capable of prioritising traffic that we looked at around 2002/2003 but I can't recall what the damn thing was called.
    1 1 was a racehorse.
    2 2 was 1 2.
    1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
    2 2 1 1 2

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi biggles77,

      Thanks for the reply. I'll try to answer your questions.

      How many WAPs do you have? currently there are 2 (unifi AP & AP Pro)
      How many users do you imagine would be connecting to each AP? 50 - 120 ( difficult to give hard numbers, depends on the day and event)
      Will the users be static or roam between APs? they will come in and select one or the other AP
      What bandwidth are the APs capable of handling? we have bandwidth available on the network of 20M / 2M, not sure if that's what you're asking for
      There was a box that was capable of prioritising traffic that we looked at around 2002/2003 but I can't recall what the damn thing was called. - isn't that they way it goes, when you need it, it's elusive?

      Comment


      • #4
        What are the make/model of the WAPs? x.11g, x.11n, x.11ac???
        1 1 was a racehorse.
        2 2 was 1 2.
        1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
        2 2 1 1 2

        Comment


        • #5
          These are the Ubiquiti Uni AP's, they are 11n


          UAP-PRO 802.11n AP PRO Access Point
          2.4GHz/5GHz, 450MBPS/300MBPS, 122m

          UAP 802.11n Access Point
          2.4GHZ, 300Mbps, 122m (range)

          Comment


          • #6
            Sorry, don't know these but they should handle anything that gets plugged into them via the blue, white, green, yellow, red oh hell, whatever coloured patch lead you use.

            Even having 20 users connecting to a single device is not going to give any sort of "wonderful" performance. The APs are just going to suck up as much bandwidth as they are connected to. Is there anything in the AP itself that would allow you to limit what it will deliver?

            I use TP-Link WAPs (and other hardware) not only because I am a cheapskate bastard but I like their THREE year warranty . I mention them because I know they have a Bandwidth Control option in their interface. It can regulate incoming and outgoing bandwidth for each AP. I wonder if your devices have a similar concept.

            Another possible option is to set the QOS on the switch ports that the APs are connected to. You will need a managed switch to be able to configure the QOS but having never tried using for that I don't know how effective it would be.

            Some other readers must have some better suggestions than mine. I am very limited because we used a WLC to manage the APs on the network and it did all the hard work while I checked my eyelids for pin holes.
            1 1 was a racehorse.
            2 2 was 1 2.
            1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
            2 2 1 1 2

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank biggles for the feedback and chuckles. Yes these devices allow for limiting bandwidth. I was trying to determine what the reasonable settings would be for doing this. I will check into the TP-Link WAPs. J~

              Comment


              • #8
                Start at 10 to 15% of total available and then see what the page loads are like. Adjust accordingly. It may take a little while but eventually you will get something that will be tolerable. Make sure you document it in case you need to replace the devices in the future.
                1 1 was a racehorse.
                2 2 was 1 2.
                1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                2 2 1 1 2

                Comment

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