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  • UK BT Hotspots


    My ISP is BT now, but strangely I can only connect to the BTWiFi-with-FON ( Whatever that means ) at this address if my BT HUB 5 is NOT on. I am of course not using an Ethernet cable or the BTHub5-C25F icon also showing under the Windows 8.1 settings. Can anyone explain why please?

    Also when I tried at another location I could only connect in the evening after it started to get dark. I did not of course take the HUB 5 with the Laptop being unable to use their phone of course.

    Gordon

  • #2
    The FON access points rely on people who subscribe to BT's service opting in to share a portion of their broadband connection via their BT Hub. This is completely separated from their own private connection - they do not pay for any public usage (and are not responsible for content transmitted across it). However, in order for a xxxx-FON access point to be available two things are required. Firstly, the Hub needs to be switched on. Secondly, there needs to be a certain amount of free bandwidth before the connection will be useable.
    A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

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    • #3
      Thanks so how come I was able to access the BTWiFi-with-FON with about 3 clicks after dark from another location a few miles, without my Hub being nearby and on. Could it be because someone else nearby was using another HUB. We could see numerous other WiFi active when we took the laptop outside.

      I now assume there is no point in trying to install a WiFIi antenna booster unless it enables me to connect to say the BTWiFi-X that was showing.

      Comment


      • #4
        You can connect to any xxxx-FON access point i.e. to any BT router's FON connection where the owner has joined the FON network (agreed to share part of their bandwidth). Presumably you can't use your own BT FON connection for obvious reasons. I expect that the BT Hub stores the MAC address of your wireless card and prevents connections to your own FON access point.
        A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

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        • #5
          Thanks excuse my ignorance. My pal has explained I must not switch off my HUB as usual when we go the other location our club. It presumably detects if is on or not with the FON connection. That is unlike the BTWiFi-X I presume.

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          • #6
            No, I think your friend is mistaken. The FON network is available from anywhere so your router does not need to be switched on.
            http://www.btwifi.co.uk/help/login-w...ur-pc.jsp#tips
            A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

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            • #7
              Sorry you seem to be contradicting yourself you posted:-

              Firstly, the Hub needs to be switched on. Secondly, there needs to be a certain amount of free bandwidth before the connection will be useable.

              Which explains why I cannot even get connected here unless the BT HUB router is on.

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              • #8
                Right. BT FON works by allocating a portion of the unused bandwidth from a BT connection. So, if you have, for example, a 400mbit connection and you are using 200 of that, the remaining (unused) portion can be allocated to the FON connection.

                Now, in order for the FON connection to be accessible a BT Hub needs to be switched on and there needs to be unused bandwidth available. This means that anyone who is participating in the FON access connection program who fulfils both these requirements make a FON access point available via their router.

                Thus, when you travel to Scotland, your BT Hub in Hastings does not need to be switched on because there will be people in Scotland making this connection available via their own routers.

                You said that your friend stated that your router needs to be switched on for this to work. Yes, but only if someone else will be connecting to your FON connection. As I said, I expect that you are unable to connect to your own FON for obvious reasons and that your BT Hub is intelligent enough to identify when this attempt is made.

                In your first post you said "My ISP is BT now, but strangely I can only connect to the BTWiFi-with-FON ( Whatever that means ) at this address if my BT HUB 5 is NOT on. I am of course not using an Ethernet cable or the BTHub5-C25F icon also showing under the Windows 8.1 settings. Can anyone explain why please?" I assume you must be connecting to a neighbour's FON connection.
                A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

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                • #9
                  Thanks so I was probably wrong telling my friends at the club, I only managed to get connected when it got dark. Since my router was not switched on at home at the time I was connected because someone else nearby switched on a Router etc.

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                  • #10
                    One of the other things that I have read about this is that a FON connection is only available when sufficient free bandwidth is available as mentioned in an earlier post. This means that although the FON connection is detected, it won't be useable unless that free bandwidth is there. This also means that although you may be able to connect, you could be kicked off if the host suddenly began streaming movies or TV etc using all or most of their bandwidth.
                    A recent poll suggests that 6 out of 7 dwarfs are not happy

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