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  • Management VLAN

    So, I'm trying to set up a 'Management Network' for a new failover Hyper-V cluster and associated SAN. It's two servers and the SAN.

    Typically, we run all public IPs; historically we've had plenty (it's a university). But, now to accomidate all the Hyper-V, cluster, and iSCSI traffic I don't have enough IPs to just use public addresses. Plus, I've been told by others that this is not the greatest way to approach it. If I could configure a management VLAN, I could ensure that iSCSI traffic is seperated from the rest of the network traffic and I can use a private IP space (saving public IPs).

    I have limited knowledge/experience with switches and VLANs and all that.

    I can handle configuring the switch to be on a private IP range network; and, I can get all the devices to talk to eachother in said network. My problem is getting to the private network/VLAN from my production network.

    How do I approach this? I thought all I needed to do was configure one of the private switch ports to tag with the VLAN that the public network runs off of; but, I seem to be out of my depth.

    I didn't configure our production switches; but, there's like 9 and some have a VLAN (lets say 20) untagged configured on them for our subnet. However, some of them aren't using 20; they're just using the default 1 untagged.

    First, will I need to config those on default 1 to 20?

    Once everything is 20 untagged; how do I move forward?
    Have the public network switch have one port tagged 100 (lets call that the private network) plugged in to the private network switch on a tagged/untagged port?

    This is still new to me

  • #2
    Re: Management VLAN

    Your question is a little all over the place. I had a hard time trying to pick up what your putting down.. But it sounds like you just need a router(or a layer 3 switch)

    However, vlans, in its simplest form are very easy.
    vlanA cannot speak to vlanB without a routing device
    Either you run VTP on all your switches and set them up that way or you configure vlanA and vlanB on each switch, then set your trunk ports to be ports where a switch connects to a switch and access ports with access to only 1 vlan.

    Now, you failed to mention which type of switches you were using for this, but whether it is Cisco or not aside.. a buddy of mine has a fantastic site which I always use whenever I need some information on configuring anything switching or routing related
    http://www.routeralley.com/ra/guides.html

    Check out the vlans and vtp pdf, that should enlighten you on vlans.
    Daniel Frei
    -Windows Operations Server Administrator
    -Exchange Guru
    -Cisco Fanatic
    -SharePoint Hippie
    -Volkswagen Enthusiast

    www.lazynetworkadmin.com

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    • #3
      Re: Management VLAN

      Originally posted by ChiliFrei64 View Post
      Your question is a little all over the place. I had a hard time trying to pick up what your putting down.. But it sounds like you just need a router(or a layer 3 switch)
      After more reading, etc. Yes, this was the thing I was not understanding.

      http://www.routeralley.com/ra/guides.html
      Great site, great info, thanks for the link.

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      • #4
        Re: Management VLAN

        Glad I could help
        Daniel Frei
        -Windows Operations Server Administrator
        -Exchange Guru
        -Cisco Fanatic
        -SharePoint Hippie
        -Volkswagen Enthusiast

        www.lazynetworkadmin.com

        Comment

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