Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Subnetting

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Subnetting

    I am changing my network from 192.168.1.X to 10.0.0.X, and in doing this I would like to expand my address from since i'm adding more and more devices to the network.

    My Subnet mask will be 255.0.0.0

    I would like to us 10.0.0.1 - 10.0.0.254 for server routers, and gateways.

    I would like my DHCP range to be 10.0.1.1 - 10.0.9.254

    How can I make this happen, and all the computers on the network will see each other. For some reason I just cant get this to work out in my head. Also how will haveing a subnet mask of 255.0.0.0 effect adding simple access point to my network?

  • #2
    Re: Subnetting

    If you want all your devices to be in 10.0.xxx.xxx (as you show above) you can use a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0

    To add another device, you will need to configure its IP in the same range (10.0.xxx.xxx)
    Tom Jones
    MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
    PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
    IT Trainer / Consultant
    Ossian Ltd
    Scotland

    ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Subnetting

      That's a big subnet. Basically everything with a 10.x.x.x ip address is in the same subnet so they'll all be able to communicate with each other. RFC 1918 explains the private ip address ranges:

      http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1918.html

      I might suggest using an addressing scheme based on the device type that keeps it easy to remember what's what. For example:

      10.0.1.x = Routers
      10.0.2.x = Switches
      10.0.3.x = Servers
      10.0.4.x = Printers
      10.0.5.x = DHCP

      OR

      10.1.x.x = Routers
      10.2.x.x = Switches
      10.3.x.x = Servers
      10.4.x.x = Printers
      10.5.x.x = DHCP

      Anyway you cut it, you've got a lot of room for flexibility.

      You could also use a 255.255.0.0 subnet mask to leave yourself some room for creating VLAN's if needed:

      10.1.x.x = VLAN 1
      10.1.1.x = Routers
      10.1.2.x = Switches
      10.1.3.x = Servers
      10.1.4.x = Printers
      10.1.5.x = DHCP

      10.2.x.x = VLAN 2
      10.2.1.x = Routers
      10.2.2.x = Switches
      10.2.3.x = Servers
      10.2.4.x = Printers
      10.1.5.x = DHCP

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Subnetting

        So when im setting up my scope I can make me the subenet 255.255.0.0 and the range 10.0.0.1 - 10.0.10.254 with an exclusion 10.0.0.1 - 10.0.0.255 and nothing else needs to be done?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Subnetting

          Well, that doesn't lend itself to easy management in terms of remembering what's what. First, decide what subnet mask you're going to use, then come up with an ip addressing scheme that fits the subnet mask. For example:

          If you use a 255.0.0.0 subnet mask, then everything from 10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255 is in the same subnet and will be able to communicate. You can configure your devices like this:

          10.0.1.1 = Router 1
          10.0.2.1 = Switch 1
          10.0.3.1 = Server 1
          10.0.4.1 = Printer 1
          10.0.5.1 to 10.0.5.255 = DHCP

          So in this case, the third octet designates the device type. This makes it easier to remember devices and device types based on their ip address. If ot's got a 10.0.1.x ip address then it's a router, etc.

          OR

          10.1.0.1 = Router 1
          10.2.0.1 = Switch 1
          10.3.0.1 = Server 1
          10.4.0.1 = Printer 1
          10.5.0.1 to 10.5.255.255 = DHCP

          So in this case the second octet designates the device type. Again, this makes it easier to remember devices and device types based on their ip address. If ot's got a 10.1.x.x ip address then it's a router, etc.

          There are an almost infinite number of ways to design your network using the 10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255 private ip address range using either a 255.0.0.0, 255.255.0.0, or a 255.255.255.0 subnet mask. You just need to pick one and design your ip addressing scheme accordingly. The examples I've shown are only a few of the myriad ways of doing it.
          Last edited by joeqwerty; 12th September 2009, 17:07.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Subnetting

            192.168.0.1 - 192.168.2.254/22 (255.255.252.0) will give you 1022 host IPs. Is that enough? If not, how many do you need. By using a CIDR http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classle...Domain_Routing you will not have to make changes to Server, Routers, Switches and anything else that has a Static IP.
            1 1 was a racehorse.
            2 2 was 1 2.
            1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
            2 2 1 1 2

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Subnetting

              well I was going to extend the 192.168.1.X range but it is causing issues with a VPN users, and their home networks being 192.1681.X.

              I like the idea of defineing devices by one of the ot's

              This is what I have a set plan as of now

              Subnet Mask: 255.0.0.0

              10.1.0.1 = Routers
              10.2.0.1 = Switches
              10.3.0.1 = Servers
              10.4.0.1 = Printers
              10.5.0.1 to 10.5.255.254 = DHCP

              Does anyone see any problems with this?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Subnetting

                No problems, although I personally tend to separate things out a bit more. Like having DCs, member servers and standalone servers grouped separately.

                250 (ish) domain controllers... ooo pretty
                Gareth Howells

                BSc (Hons), MBCS, MCP, MCDST, ICCE

                Any advice is given in good faith and without warranty.

                Please give reputation points if somebody has helped you.

                "For by now I could have stretched out my hand and struck you and your people with a plague that would have wiped you off the Earth." (Exodus 9:15) - I could kill you with my thumb.

                "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you." (Genesis 9:3) - For every animal you don't eat, I'm going to eat three.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Subnetting

                  ok i ran a small test and the windows 2008 DHCP server was issuing ip address like 10.2.0.0 I didnt think you could use '0' in the last octet

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Subnetting

                    Originally posted by DubOhio View Post
                    well I was going to extend the 192.168.1.X range but it is causing issues with a VPN users, and their home networks being 192.1681.X.

                    I like the idea of defineing devices by one of the ot's

                    This is what I have a set plan as of now

                    Subnet Mask: 255.0.0.0

                    10.1.0.1 = Routers
                    10.2.0.1 = Switches
                    10.3.0.1 = Servers
                    10.4.0.1 = Printers
                    10.5.0.1 to 10.5.255.254 = DHCP

                    Does anyone see any problems with this?
                    Yes, I do. It is going to end up one big messy bunch of numbers that nobody except you will understand. It is so non standard it's not funny.
                    Can't anyone else see how silly this is? 16,777,214 possible hosts. WHY???

                    As I asked above, how many IPs do you need? Additionally, how many Printers, Servers, Switches do you have? With the above mess, what happens when you open a branch office or your present company buys another business? Even Microsoft only run a B Class IP Range.
                    1 1 was a racehorse.
                    2 2 was 1 2.
                    1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
                    2 2 1 1 2

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Subnetting

                      Originally posted by biggles77 View Post
                      Yes, I do. It is going to end up one big messy bunch of numbers that nobody except you will understand. It is so non standard it's not funny.
                      Can't anyone else see how silly this is? 16,777,214 possible hosts. WHY???

                      As I asked above, how many IPs do you need? Additionally, how many Printers, Servers, Switches do you have? With the above mess, what happens when you open a branch office or your present company buys another business? Even Microsoft only run a B Class IP Range.
                      With all due respect, what would you suggest? I really don't see why there seems to be a tendency to frown on using the 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 address range. Just because it allows for 16,777,214 hosts doesn't mean there will be 16,777,214 hosts. And don't get me started on how big the broadcast domain is because the broadcast domain is only as big as the number of actual hosts connected. Just because the network allows for a potential of 16,777,214 hosts all broadcasting their guts out, we all know there won't be anywhere near that number of real hosts.

                      As I said earlier, there are about 16,777,214 ways to do it and my suggestions were but a few. If it were me this is what I would do:

                      I would create a network using 10.0.0.0/16. This allows me to have multiple VLAN's or networks at 10.0.0.0, 10.1.0.0, 10.2.0.0, etc., etc. I would use the second octet to designate the physical location (main office, satellite office, etc.) then I would use the third octect to designate the device type: 10.0.1.x for routers, 10.0.2.x for switches, etc. This allows me to "logically" segregate locations and devices by type and gives me an easy way to remember what location and device type it is based on it's ip address. If it's 10.0.2.54 I know it's a switch on my main campus/office network. If it's 10.5.4.20, I know it's a printer at my satellite office, etc., etc.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Subnetting

                        Here's how one company I worked at did it (1500+ users, 75+ offices):

                        10.1.x.1 - main router / PIX / ASA for office x
                        10.1.x.5 - WiFi
                        10.1.x.20-29 - printers
                        10.1.x.100-150 - computers

                        Gave us enough space for growth, but at the same time easy to understand and manageable.

                        How many users / offices do you have (appx)?
                        ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Subnetting

                          2 building connected with fiber. I went with joeqwerty said. you never know when business will pick up, and we'll expand. Thanks for all the help! I would have not been able to complete the project with the confidance that I had with out the support, and information you all provided. Thanks!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Subnetting

                            Glad to help. Hopefully I didn't create any discension in the ranks, as that was certainly not my intention. Let us know how you make out with the project.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Subnetting

                              Migration went as smooth as it could have. Thanks for all the help!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X