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  • routing and Active directory

    Hi all,

    Recently we set up another unit that caters to our customer. However, our client needs us to setup a network subnet ( 172.16.22.0 subnet ) to access their SAP server remotely. We have 6 PCs that are in that subnet for data-entry and order-processing.

    Here is the question. My company subnet is 192.114.23.0 and we have an Exchange 2003 server running. How do I configure those 6 pcs in 172.16.22.0 subnet to authenticate with the AD server residing in 192.114.23.0 subnet and ultimately, get the mails from the Exchange server.


    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: routing and Active directory

    Physically speaking, where are the subnets located? Are they in the same building?
    How are the computers connected to the network and what network devices do you have?
    Are both subnets connected to the Internet?

    More info please.
    Regards,
    Jeremy

    Network Consultant/Engineer
    Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
    www.gma-cpa.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: routing and Active directory

      All Pcs are located in the same unit. Both routers are located in the same server room. The only different is both routers are connected to their own leased lines. The LAN port of both routers are connected to a common switch meant for the whole company. The router that is meant for the office is Zyxel zywall 70 and the router to connect to my customer's network is zyxel USG 200


      PCs in our subnet can access internet while the other is not able to.

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      • #4
        Re: routing and Active directory

        OK, they connect to the same switch. Do you have them on separate VLANs?
        Do you want the "other" (the customer, right?) subnet to access the Internet?

        If the routers have extra interfaces then you can connect the two routers together on another subnet and setup routing between them.

        If the routers don't have extra interfaces then, if the switch is separated by VLANs, on one of the routers you can:
        - connect it to trunk a port on the switch
        - enable dot1q the router's LAN interface
        - add an additional IP address for the other subnet on the routers' LAN interface (this may vary on the router... you may have to setup a VLAN interface for each subnet and then assign the VLANs to the LAN port on the router)
        - on the router that only has one IP configured, add a static route for the other subnet and point it to the newly configured interface on the other router.
        You may need to disable Spanning-tree on the LAN interface of the router that has dot1q enabled.

        If you don't use VLANs then you can:
        - add an additional IP address for the other subnet on the routers' LAN interface
        - on the router that only has one IP configured, add a static route for the other subnet and point it to the newly configured interface on the other router.
        Regards,
        Jeremy

        Network Consultant/Engineer
        Baltimore - Washington area and beyond
        www.gma-cpa.com

        Comment

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