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  • BT Fibre broadband

    Beware if you are a customer of BT fibre Broadband like me you many also get this problem, which I have notified Ofcom. Though Ofcom no longer get involved in helping solving such problems they state they do like to hear of such.

    When I transferred to BT fibre broadband around May this year I have it in writing they promised to be able to provide me with a speed of around 18 Mbps of a maximum of 30 Mbps. I doubt as often the case with servers anyone actually gets the full speed. I did get 18 Mps at first for a few months, but since then my speed has dropped to just over 15 Mbps though I keep my Hub connected on all the time. That is unless there is fault on the line, then I restart the power.

    So I complained by phone and as often the case spoke to an Indian Lady. After persuading her instead of asking me to make various checks such a replacing the extension cable with a new one and only plugging it in the BT master box, which I have often done, she checked my line, speed and the BT Exchange. The result was she could not find any problem, but then made the strange claim BT no longer guaranteed my speed to be any more that 10 Mbps. Could this new dictate have something to do with the wonderful claim by BT to have broadband covering the whole country one day, but again with a guarantee of no more than 10 Mbps?

    Beware since you probably all in UK rely in BT phone lines no matter what server you pay, you may also suffer from the same drop in speed.

  • #2
    Gordon, not sure why this is in the terminal services area - moved to Generaal netwworking
    Tom Jones
    MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
    PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
    IT Trainer / Consultant
    Ossian Ltd
    Scotland

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    • #3
      Gordon, are you aware that BT don't give you all the bandwidth that the cabling to your house can handle? Their ads which talk about '...the largest wifi coverage in the UK...' (or words to that effect) don't tell you that each home user has some amount of bandwidth held back so that BT can offer wifi hot-spots to any BT customer, anywhere in the country. I have seen this several times--I have a friend who is a BT engineer and he confirms it. Say your copper wiring can handle up to 18Mbps downlink speed to your house. You may only see 12-15Mbps of that for your own use, the rest belongs to BT so they can host anonymous BT wifi hot-spots that any existing BT customer can access if they're within range. Who's to say they aren't taking a larger percentage away now than they did, say, 3 years ago? That's just one reason why I don't use BT as my ISP. This may have something to do with your situation, but I could just as easily be way off the mark.
      *RicklesP*
      MSCA (2003/XP), Security+, CCNA

      ** Remember: credit where credit is due, and reputation points as appropriate **

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      • #4
        BT WiFi hotspots aren't enabled by default, you have to opt in which allows you to access other hotspots, which you also don't get by default.

        I use my own router (A Draytek 2860) because the BT routers are cheap rubbish and they have backdoors in to them, and I am getting the full 40mbps from mine. BTs customer support is utterly useless though and always has been.
        BSc, MCSA: Server 2008, MCSE, MCSA: Messaging, MCTS
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        • #5
          Gordon, where are you obtaining your speeds from?
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          • #6
            Thanks guys for all your advice. I usually use http://speedtest.btwholesale.com/ to check my speed but others show much the same often slower. Any more suggestions for alternative routers. I too find BT Hot spots hit and miss getting better connections with my little 7 inch Android tablet than a Toshiba laptop under Win 8.1. The latter gives up trying to download MS and AVG updates unless I plug in the Ethernet cable.

            I have just had a warning the BT UB has a problem yet it still glows blue. I am rather baffled since BT control the lines am I right in thinking it makes no difference what server you pay, BT will still decide on your speed and whether to reduce it?
            Last edited by GordonSweet; 17th November 2015, 16:12.

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            • #7
              Generally, using the btwholesale speed test should yield a better result than speedtest.net - this is because BT can control the speed within the network, but when you go speedtest.net it's out of BT's control, who knows how many interconnects you might pass.

              Are your speedtest results using wifi, or wired cable?
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              • #8
                I only use Ethernet cable to the BT HUB with the two Desktop PCs as neither have a a Wifi Card etc. So I suppose those with any server can suffer eventually with falling speeds not just BT customers like me. Could it be mine has dropped as I use BT Hotspots with my Android Tablet?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by GordonSweet View Post
                  Could it be mine has dropped as I use BT Hotspots with my Android Tablet?
                  There is no way using a hotspot could affect your home speed. On the other hand, if your router is also a hotspot, other people using it could affect you.

                  Note I am (a) not sure if your router IS a hotspot - I believe it is a "service" BT give you - and (b) how you would disable it if it is

                  Tom Jones
                  MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
                  PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
                  IT Trainer / Consultant
                  Ossian Ltd
                  Scotland

                  ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

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                  • #10
                    I have a WiFi choice on my Android Tablet and my slow Toshiba Laptop of using a BT Hostspot or my BT HUB or a HP Printer when on. But only I can use the BT HUB Wifi using the Password supplied.

                    Actually I have difficulty in accessing the BT FON hotpot with the laptop when at the Radio Club, though I can see other routers. Even at home here I cannot trust the BT Hotspot when updating Windows etc. and have to plug in the Ethernet cable. I am hoping for more luck with the Android Tablet at the club sometime.

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                    • #11
                      And you're definitely sure you have Fibre? I understood fibre to be a far more reliable last-mile method than ADSL... far more capable of providing specific, defined speeds...
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                      • #12
                        Oh yes I pay around 18 for it plus for the landline. Besides who gets 15 MPS for ordinary broadband, anyway I have received all sorts of gen about it from BT and presumably would not be allowed to use BT Hotspots unless using fast fibre

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                        • #13
                          Oh yes I pay some 18 pm for it, and have received all sorts of emails from BT when first connected. Besides who get 15 Mps using ordinary Broadband

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                          • #14
                            ok so it looks like (and i might be wrong) you have what is called FTTN or Fibre to the Neighbourhood/Node. The fibre runs to a little box, possibly in your street, then existing copper cables are used for the "last mile"
                            This means, the further you are from the cabinet/node - the lower your speeds are likely to be. There's also possibly congestion at the node, if the provider hasn't put in enough connectivity over the fibre. Plus you get affected by interface with other residents if they all have fttc.

                            Of course, if you definitely have fibre-to-the-premises or FTTP, it's a bit different.

                            It is possible to get guaranteed-line rate services (at least, I know it is here in Australia) however you need to be prepared to pay roughly the same amount per month as it costs to pay the royal family :P

                            I have "100Mb" Cable (Hybrid-Fibre-Coax or HFC) but I rarely see the full speed. Oh, I can run speedtests from my provider's speedtest site and get the 100M/sec - but real world performance, not a hope. It's taken a lot of work and multithreading downloads to get even close to that.
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                            • #15
                              Yes Hastings and Bexhill here in the UK probably like other towns is populated by numerous Green BT Boxes. These I understand receive the data by WiFi then it has to travel by ordinary phone lines to the likes of me. I believe my box is around 200 yards away.

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