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3rd party application updates, SCCM, WSUS?

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  • 3rd party application updates, SCCM, WSUS?

    Hi everyone,

    This is my first IT job with 0 training so if theres a ovbious solution i will not have seen it haha

    We have a network of 80 pc's with 5 branches and we currently use WSUS

    our wan links are slow and i would like to start maintaining 3rd party (adobe reader, shittyl little apps the office managers want people using et.c.) apps.

    before i started here there was nothing, you would see XP SP2 machines with adobe reader 8 e.t.c. since implementing wsus it has gotten better but its still hard to manage software versions.

    As we are still small i was thinking i could either do SCE, or do it via GPO if its not too tedious, or even just distribute cd's every 1/4 with a batch script and the latest version of applications.

    Should the software initially be deployed by GPO or is it fine to just do it using wsus, i figure i wont be able to remove it using GP but then again its just stuff like reader...

    Last edited by Gruelius; 24th October 2011, 04:01.

  • #2
    Re: 3rd party application updates, SCCM, WSUS?

    I would go ahead and deploy Spiceworks, while it not deploy the updates, it does allow you to setup a weekly audit on your network looking for out of date applications, drivers and firmware.

    Its 100% free, has heaps of infomation and advice built into it, and its super easy to deploy.

    If you want something to deploy them from a central location, then most of the Dev's will make deployment software for each package.

    If in asking for more details about a problem I seem to be rude, think about it this way, If I did not have to ask, I would not of been forced to be rude.

    Please assume anything and everything I say to be wrong unless I have provided links and evidence, or you have done the same.
    IE: you blow your server up following my advice, not my bad

    A OP is bad if I can go to and answer the question by pressing 4 buttons. "Ctrl +c, Ctrl +v".


    • #3
      Re: 3rd party application updates, SCCM, WSUS?

      yeah my manager wants me to look into that too. but i would still prefer to have an automated setup that we can manage easily.
      So if i had msi executables would iwant to roll out software using GP or wsus? I understand using WSUS would not allow me to remove the software as easily which might be a pain.


      • #4
        Re: 3rd party application updates, SCCM, WSUS?

        I normally apply all Microsoft updates via WSUS, since it's free, and relatively easy to set up. You can run it on a basic system, or even a virtual machine (which is what I'm currently doing).

        I use GPO to apply basic non-MS updates. Note that some vendors make that easier than others. It is apparently possible to deploy some third-party patches with WSUS, but that may require additional add-ons from a company like EminentWare.

        System Center Config Manager is great, but it takes some work and will cost you some money. If you are the only admin, are relatively new to this, or if your organization is tight with a buck (remember that you might want to ask for some training funds in addition to those needed for the product) I'd probably recommend staying with the aforementioned setup.
        Last edited by LoneWolf15; 31st October 2011, 18:40.


        • #5
          Re: 3rd party application updates, SCCM, WSUS?

          Thanks for that,

          Yeah i have WSUS running for our org and it works quite well. was just wondering about using WSUS for non-ms software (e.g. eminentware)

          Do you have any documents on good practises for rolling software out by GPO?

          I would assume it woiuld be computer object based, and would all of the software packages reside in one GPO per "system configuration"? e.g. customer service GPO, Sales PC GPO e.t.c.


          • #6
            Re: 3rd party application updates, SCCM, WSUS?

            TechNet has an article on installing via GPO. (sadly, I cannot post links yet.) However, go to Google and type in "installing software via gpo best practices" and its the first link.

            Also, to answer your second question that would depend on how you want to split the computers up. Do certain departments get different software? You can link a GPO to multiple OU's if every machine needs it. (i.e. Office/ERP Software/etc.)