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  • Group policy not applying

    Hi, I am trying to test a group policy but it does not appear to be applying and I am not sure why!

    I am trying to apply a user group policy to disable the 'Search Bar' Button. I create the GPO against an OU that contains the test user account I am using but it does not disable.

    The scope is for Authenticated users and Group policy permission is set to apply.

    What command with 'gpresult' can I use to see what is applying?

    I have tried the GPMC , the GPMC is installed on a DC which is win 2003, the server I am trying to get this to work on is Win 2000 and when I try to do 'Group Policy Results' I get a message to say that "this is only supported on servers later than Win 2000" !

    I can not figure out a way of checking what group policies this test user is getting. Help appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: Group policy not applying

    nwhittak,

    You could try running RSOP in planning mode. Check HERE for more details. Also, if you log onto a desktop as that user you could use the gpresult /z command to receive verbose logging of what is applying both to the computer and user account.

    -Jason
    MCSA/MCSE 2K3,MCITP:ESA,MCTS x 4,VCP x 2

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    • #3
      Re: Group policy not applying

      Hi

      Restart the system to update the new updated GPO or use the below command to update the policy

      for 2Kpro

      SECEDIT /REFRESHPOLICY MACHINE_POLICY /ENFORCE
      SECEDIT /REFRESHPOLICY USER_POLICY /ENFORCE

      For XP

      Gpupdate

      And check the event log for the GPO update status.

      Ganesh
      Last edited by Ossian; 11th July 2009, 08:55.

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      • #4
        Re: Group policy not applying

        Originally posted by nwhittak View Post
        I can not figure out a way of checking what group policies this test user is getting. Help appreciated.
        For this policy in particular:
        Log on as the test user to the client.
        Start Regedit.exe and browse to the key:
        HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\ CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

        Are there in this key any Items with the name
        - NoFind (REG_DWORD =1)
        and/or
        - NoShellSearchButton (REG_DWORD =1)

        GPO:
        User Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Explorer \=> "Remove Search button from Windows Explorer"
        This policy removes the Search button from the Standard Buttons toolbar in Windows Explorer, and from the programs that use it, like My Computer and My Network Places.
        This policy configures the "NoShellSearchButton" item in the registry.

        GPO:
        User Configuration\AdministrativeTemplates\Start Menu & Taskbar \=> "Remove Search menu from Start Menu"
        This policy removes the Search button from the Start menu or from the Windows Explorer context menu, and F3 and Application Key+F.
        This policy configures "NoFind" item in the registry.

        Also check if one of the items might also exist in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE hive on the same computer. If it is configured there too it is possible it'll take precedence over the configuration in HKEY_CURRENT_USER part of the registry.

        -

        To use the registry to determine which Group Policy Objects are applied to a user and computer: (source)
        • 1. Open Registry Editor.

        • 2a. To view the Group Policy Objects applied to the user, navigate to the key
          HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\Group Policy\History.

        • 2b. To view the Group Policy Objects applied to the computer, navigate to the key
          HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curr entVersion\Group Policy\History.

        • 3. In this key you'll find other keys that represent the Group Policy Objects applied to the user or computer.
          Within these keys, you'll find numbered keys that indicate the order in which specific group policies were applied. For example, a key name of 0 indicates that this policy was applied first when the user logged on, and a key name of 1 indicates that this policy was applied next, and so on.

          Within each of the numbered keys, you'll find values that identify the group policy applied to the user or computer. For example, the DisplayName gives you the user-friendly name of the Group Policy Object. The GPOLink value enables you to determine to what scope the GPO applied, as follows:
          1. = The GPO is linked to a computer.
          2. = The GPO is linked to a site.
          3. = The GPO is linked to a domain.
          4. = The GPO is linked to an organizational unit.


        \Rems

        This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

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