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  • Asked about dsquery

    When I put the following:

    dsquery user-inactive 2

    Does this mean that 2? 2 weeks, 2 months, 2 days
    "The destination is the shuffled cards, but we are where we play."

  • #2
    Re: Asked about dsquery

    Weeks, IIRC
    Tom Jones
    MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
    PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
    IT Trainer / Consultant
    Ossian Ltd
    Scotland

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    • #3
      Re: Asked about dsquery

      Originally posted by mgonzalol View Post
      When I put the following:

      dsquery user-inactive 2

      Does this mean that 2? 2 weeks, 2 months, 2 days
      It means at least for 2 Weeks

      The Help clearly stated:
      -inactive <NumWeeks> == Finds users that have been inactive (not logged on) for at least <NumWeeks> number of weeks.

      The reason for it to be not in days is,
      dsquery uses the lastLogonTimeStamp attribute for this. However this attribute is unlike the lastlogon attribute not up to the minute.
      The lastLogonTimeStamp attribute is only used in Windows Server 2003 Domain Functional Level mode !
      Unlike the lastlogon attribute, the lastLogonTimeStamp attribute replicates like most other attribute. The problem is that the value is not updated when the user logs on unless the old value is more than 14 days in the past. That means the value can only be trusted if it is more than 14 days in the past.


      \Rems

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