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  • Rebuild or Repair?

    I have an office, I just came on as their main IT staff, and AD is not my favorite thing in the world.

    I have a whole bunch of questions:

    First the name. The previous tech named the domain ourcompany.com in stead of ourcompany.local which I have always used to avoid confusion in the DNS architecture. What is the best way? use .com for the domain or .local???

    Ok, second. The domain was originally a 2000 domain, but they purchased exchange2003 and upgraded the domain, and I believe they tried to make it the pdc, but I'm not sure the last guy new what he was doing. And i'm not sure, but i think some of the roles are still on the old 2000 server. Can anybody point me to a good checklist of upgrading domains and replacing machines so I can make sure everything got done?

    Finally, this nice new machine they bought, 150 gigs of storage, partitioned to c: 20 gig and d: 130 gig. but they last guy installed exchange on the c: drive with all the data there too. nothing on the D. the machine is starting to run out of space. Can I fix this? Partition magic? or is it better to just start over?

    I've got all these issues i'm trying to contend with, while replacing switches and changing the IP address architecture for the office.

    I'm starting to think, I should just bring up a new server, start with a fresh and clean, brand new build, new domain structure, exchange on the big drive, etc...
    but there are 25-30 users in the office, more email aliases than I can count, and criss crossing file permissions all over the place.

    If there was a way to export the users, exchange config, and directory permisions, and then import into the new domain, it might be the way to go, otherwise, I'm gonna have to figure out a way to fix each of these issues separately.

    Does anyone have any good ideas? Helpful suggestions?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Rebuild or Repair?

    I inherited a company with a server named .com too but it was not a big deal. Their web site was hosted outside the domain. No one inside the domain could access the web site so I just put a www a-host record in DNS and resolved it to the web server.

    Ran into the same problem with the drives too. I never partition anymore. You can easily move the mail store to D, that's very simple. Data is even easier to move, especially user's folders. If you have a script that maps drives, any changes you made relocating from C to D would not be seen.

    The only provisio might be applications that expect to see their data at a given spot, like accounting programs.

    If you are new on board, wiping the server and re-doing it is a very major and disruptive undertaking for someone new on the job. Why don't you get to know them a little better, and let them get to know you better too. In the mean time, you have lots to occupy your time with fixing things. Maybe look at a major undertaking down the road, and only if necessary.

    p.s.
    Don't use partition utilities on a production server. If anything goes wrong, and it happens from time to time, you're history.
    Network Engineers do IT under the desk

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Rebuild or Repair?

      Originally posted by AriDiz View Post
      I have an office, I just came on as their main IT staff, and AD is not my favorite thing in the world.

      I have a whole bunch of questions:

      First the name. The previous tech named the domain ourcompany.com in stead of ourcompany.local which I have always used to avoid confusion in the DNS architecture. What is the best way? use .com for the domain or .local???

      Ok, second. The domain was originally a 2000 domain, but they purchased exchange2003 and upgraded the domain, and I believe they tried to make it the pdc, but I'm not sure the last guy new what he was doing. And i'm not sure, but i think some of the roles are still on the old 2000 server. Can anybody point me to a good checklist of upgrading domains and replacing machines so I can make sure everything got done?

      Finally, this nice new machine they bought, 150 gigs of storage, partitioned to c: 20 gig and d: 130 gig. but they last guy installed exchange on the c: drive with all the data there too. nothing on the D. the machine is starting to run out of space. Can I fix this? Partition magic? or is it better to just start over?

      I've got all these issues i'm trying to contend with, while replacing switches and changing the IP address architecture for the office.

      I'm starting to think, I should just bring up a new server, start with a fresh and clean, brand new build, new domain structure, exchange on the big drive, etc...
      but there are 25-30 users in the office, more email aliases than I can count, and criss crossing file permissions all over the place.

      If there was a way to export the users, exchange config, and directory permisions, and then import into the new domain, it might be the way to go, otherwise, I'm gonna have to figure out a way to fix each of these issues separately.

      Does anyone have any good ideas? Helpful suggestions?

      Thanks
      Name: for logical and order in the domain, .local
      2000 to 2003: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/325379/en-us and check FSMO roles
      Disk: For best results format and reinstall, or change to volume and create a spaned disk http://support.microsoft.com/kb/225551/en-us

      if you speak in spanish, maybe we can chat better

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Rebuild or Repair?

        I've never seen anyone use ".local" except in the Exams. I don't believe it's necessary to name the domain differently to the company's internet presence as long as you know how it works - I've certainly never experienced confusion anyway


        Tom
        For my own and your protection, I do not provide support by private message under any circumstances. All such messages will be deleted and ignored.

        Anything you say will be misquoted and used against you

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Rebuild or Repair?

          1. We use a .com namespace here and it doesn't cause us any issues at all. If you need to access a Webserver using your dns name then follow the advice provided.

          2. I'm not sure what you mean here. There are no such things as PDC's any more. AD is a multimaster odel and each DC has a writeable copy of the AD database. Does exchange work properly??

          3. Why not move the log files and the mailbox stores to the D?? Very simple to do. From our Mr Petri himself.

          Rebuilding the domain will probably get you the sack. Fix the problems as you go along.

          Comment

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