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  • Exchange Incoming Mail Routing

    Hi,

    I want to test a scenario where currently I have 4 Physical Exchange 2010 servers (3 are in a DAG). They all have their own external IP addresses and can all receive and send mail. I would like to test the scenario where Only 1 of the servers is receiving the mail although the "internet" can send to any of the 4, therefore I assume this is a network routing style issue, however is there anything in Exchange where I can send incoming mail to 1 server before it hits one of the other 3? Currently it would appear any of the 4 receive mail at any time and it's all a little random.

    I would be happy to keep outgoing as it is for the time being.

    Background Info: I inherited a very patchy/ broken 2007-2010 upgrade 2 years ago and am just starting to sort out the minor irritations e.g. spam, certificate warnings and backups!

    Thank You for any advice you can give.

    regards,
    Jonathan Ward

  • #2
    Re: Exchange Incoming Mail Routing

    How are your MX records configured externally and what priority? Do they come via an external AV provider before hitting your side?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Exchange Incoming Mail Routing

      Thanks for your reply,

      I have recently changed the MX record to the server I want at Priority 10 and the alias for the server at 20

      no external providers, everything is in-house

      Regards,
      Jonathan

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Exchange Incoming Mail Routing

        Short answer - no.
        MX record costs are routinely ignored. Higher cost servers are actually targeted by spammers. I run a long term experiment with one of my clients, two servers, identical in every way, except one is cost 10, one is cost 20. The 20 gets about 40% of all email, but 80% of all the spam.
        If you want all email to go to one server, then take the others out of the MX records. That is the only way you can do it.
        Exchange can process email for any user delivered to any server. Just ensure that all servers are equipped with anti-spam and antivirus measures.

        Simon.
        --
        Simon Butler
        Exchange MVP

        Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
        More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
        Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
        In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

        Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Exchange Incoming Mail Routing

          Perfect answer, thank you.

          I did think about MX records, so I had changed them, however I don't think I allowed much time for them to settle, I guess it's possible some mail routers have cached entries?

          As it stands I have my server and and Alias for it set at 10 and 20, with Spam software installed on that server, and so the testing begins...

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Exchange Incoming Mail Routing

            DNS gets cached all over the place (what other people call propagation time - which doesn't exist). Therefore it can be 48 hours or more before a change is seen.

            Furthermore, it is not unheard of for spammers to retain their own records and continue to send spam to an address they know has a mail server on it. This is to catch lazy admins who change the MX records but don't change the firewall.

            Simon.
            --
            Simon Butler
            Exchange MVP

            Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
            More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
            Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
            In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

            Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

            Comment

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