Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

split domain?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • split domain?

    Hello,
    Looking for recommendation on best way to implement email for an organization that has the following:
    ~10 local users
    ~500 non-local users ( do not need account, just a mailbox)
    ~1000 generic mailboxes such as [email protected]

    We have an exchange server running on MS SBS 2007.



    I thought of :
    • Setting generic milboxes by mail-enabling public folders;
    • Setting non-local mailboxes on ISP, this way I would not need MS CALs for all those users.
    Given the above I am thinking of two options:
    1. Define the highest MX at the ISP and have it forward all non-resolved email addresses to our exchange server
    2. Define the highest MX for our exchange server and have it forward all non-resolved email addresses to our ISP
    If the above is doable then
    1. How exactly do you set this up - are there any requirements for the ISP?
    2. Which option is better ?
    3. If not, what is the right way to do this ?
    4. What would you do if you also needed to provide backup in case our exchange server is down in the above scenario?
    Open for any other suggestions as to how to implement this.
    Thanks,
    --Foosy
    Last edited by Foosy; 1st February 2010, 06:37.

  • #2
    Re: split domain?

    You are referring to a shared SMTP address as you want to use Exchange.
    That needs careful configuration, which is outlined in this article:
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/l...EXCHG.80).aspx

    On that number of user accounts, plenty of ISPs will want to you to give them the service, but I have seen how most ISPs treat their email. Personally I would get a dedicated server and run your own email server. Depending on the feature set that you required, you could operate something like SmarterMail on a Windows 2003 dedicated server. Complete control over the entire environment then.

    Personally I don't like either suggestion for email traffic that you have suggested, because both could result in a large amount of email being routed through Exchange.
    If you had everything pointing at Exchange, then Exchange would be sending most email out - which would use significant bandwidth.
    If you had everything pointing elsewhere, then you would find that Exchange is coping with all the non valid email addresses. I have a client who drops 10,000 messages a day to non-valid email addresses.

    Another option would be to use two domains. One domain exclusively for Exchange and one domain for all of the external accounts. Then whatever you are using for the large number of accounts have it set to forward the email to the Exchange server for those small number of users.

    Exchange is the least of your worries here.

    Simon.
    --
    Simon Butler
    Exchange MVP

    Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
    More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
    Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
    In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

    Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: split domain?

      Thanks Simon for the quick answer.
      We need to use exchange because we need the integration with Sharepoint and Microsoft Dynamics CRM, so SmarterMail which is really nice - is not an alternative here.

      We can't use two domains because the whole point was to give the non-local users a mailbox that identifies them with our organization.

      If I understand you properly, the issue with pointing "everything elsewhere" is that exchange becomes the authoritative domain, hence it has to drop or NDR all the non-valid email addresses.


      Is there a third solution where we use two servers at the ISP where one is authoritative and acts as a forwarder to the exchange server? If this can be done, then the only cumbersomeness I see is that every local or generic email address has to be managed twice: once in Exchange, the other at this middle server.

      I am open to any other solutions ...
      Maybe (and this this may be an oxymoron) we can achieve the same without a third server, by making the forwarder authoritative?

      Regardless of the above, the 1000 generic email addresses are getting seriously spammed, so they will be sending tons of messages to the exchange server. Unless, we can do some filtering at the ISP.

      Your thoughts?

      --Foosy
      Last edited by Foosy; 1st February 2010, 16:03.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: split domain?

        Given such a smaller number of users in Exchange, I would discount Exchange for a moment.
        Setup all accounts on whatever you are going to use for the bulk accounts, including the Exchange users.

        As long as you have some kind of forwarding option in the software then you configure it to forward to the Exchange server using a second domain. That second domain needs to be on Exchange, but without it being the default email address. Exchange will then accept the email.

        Finally Exchange will need to be configured to share the SMTP address space as per the article I have linked to above.
        Exchange basically has nothing to do with email delivery for anyone but the 10 users.

        Although Sharepoint can be run without Exchange and I am pretty sure so can Dynamics.

        Simon.
        --
        Simon Butler
        Exchange MVP

        Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
        More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
        Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
        In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

        Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: split domain?

          Genius!
          A second domain that is not the default smtp -Excellent idea!

          On the same topic- the current mailboxes are on an cyrus IMAP mail server.
          The generic email addresses (and there are a lot of them...) act in the same way as NNTP news where people can subscribe to. The closest thing I know that exists in exchange is the public folders. Is there any other way to handle those?

          And if there isn't and they must be migrated to exchange- can transporter do it? I read an article about migrating IMAP with transporter but it does not address migrating to public folders. I have posted numerous places and asked numerous people- but noone seems to know the answer. Would you?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: split domain?

            IMAP is a mailbox to mailbox migration only. Public Folders are not mailboxes.
            Exchange works on a permissions basis, so you users need to have permissions to mailboxes or public folders to access them.

            If you want the items in public folders you would have to import the content in to a mailbox then move the content to public folders and mail enable the public folders. Almost certainly a large amount of manual work would be required, as there are almost no automated public folder tools available - Microsoft are trying to kill off public folders.

            Simon.
            --
            Simon Butler
            Exchange MVP

            Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
            More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
            Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
            In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

            Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: split domain?

              They probably should kill public folders as it is an odd concept especially with sharepoint available and others methods of sharing data. Then again- I would not object to public mailboxes - as opposed to public folders, which could exist without a user account and which users could subscribe to- similar to IMAP...

              Thanks again for the help Simon,
              --Foosy

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: split domain?

                Sharepoint has only got close to Public Folder functionality in the latest version - but note I say close. It is not the replacement that Microsoft have been claiming it is for the last few years.
                I have a larger public folder store at home than I do private, as all of my lists and group emails go in there, as do a lot of company information. I cannot do either of those through Sharepoint and read the email through Outlook.

                The functionality you have asked for is highly unusual. I have been working with Exchange on forums for some time - five or six years and have seen lots of odd requests in my time, but what you have requested is completely new one for me. It is the exact opposite of what clients usually want - they don't want anything open, then want to (and need to in many cases) strictly control the access to the content in a way that can be audited.

                Simon.
                --
                Simon Butler
                Exchange MVP

                Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
                More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
                Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
                In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

                Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: split domain?

                  [QUOTE=Foosy;194733]Hello,
                  Looking for recommendation on best way to implement email for an organization that has the following:
                  ~10 local users
                  ~500 non-local users ( do not need account, just a mailbox)
                  ~1000 generic mailboxes such as [email protected]

                  We have an exchange server running on MS SBS 2007.

                  Hi ,

                  check this solution if it helps you.

                  10 Local user
                  Exchange 2007

                  500 non local user
                  you can have mailbox but you need to attach it to some user in order to
                  access.

                  As you mentioned to use ISP, then you need to pay them to have you mailbox hosted.

                  1000 generic
                  Public folder as you mentioned, again you need to group similar users together, define permission on mail enabled public folders so that only those users can have access PF who are suppose to have an xs

                  Mx higher records won't work as you have suggested
                  What you need to do is
                  create contact with their target email address to your isp so emails can come to ur exchange env then forwarded to isp.
                  When users will reply you can make use of address rewrite function to change the out going address to be of your domain.

                  Finally u must mention isp connecting ip and your connecting ip (exchange)
                  in spf records so that email won't get blocked due to false identity.

                  hope this will help you
                  Thanks & Regards
                  v-2nas

                  MCTS 2008, MCTIP, MCSE 2003, MCSA+Messaging E2K3, MCP, E2K7
                  Sr. Wintel Eng. (Investment Bank)
                  Independent IT Consultant and Architect
                  Blog: http://www.exchadtech.blogspot.com

                  Show your appreciation for my help by giving reputation points

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X