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Making Exchange 2000 more resilient

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  • Making Exchange 2000 more resilient

    Our Exchange Server has only ever had disk problems. At the moment we are two days into restoring Exchange Database file that became corrupt due to a disk failure.

    Server: Windows 2000 SP4 running Exchange 2000 with SP3, DC, Internal DNS Server and Roaming profiles Server
    Disk: Raid 5 with 3 36gb disks

    We have three offices in UK, but the exchange server is in the London office, the offices are linked by BT Frame Stream links.

    Does anyone have a possible suggestion for how to make it more fault tolerant?

    I hope I have provided enough information that helps. Thanks to all you kind folks!!!

  • #2
    Re: Making Exchange 2000 more resilient

    how many disks broke down? 3 in a Raid 5 set is quit minimum. i'll always recommend at least 4 disks. why? Raid 5 on 2 disks (if one fails) will break down the complete performance.

    but what happens with the crash and How do you backup?
    Marcel
    Technical Consultant
    Netherlands
    http://www.phetios.com
    http://blog.nessus.nl

    MCITP(EA, SA), MCSA/E 2003:Security, CCNA, SNAF, DCUCI, CCSA/E/E+ (R60), VCP4/5, NCDA, NCIE - SAN, NCIE - BR, EMCPE
    "No matter how secure, there is always the human factor."

    "Enjoy life today, tomorrow may never come."
    "If you're going through hell, keep going. ~Winston Churchill"

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    • #3
      Re: Making Exchange 2000 more resilient

      pdania,

      First Off, your disk problems was it with a Dell Server? Just curious. You can of course setup a Exchange Cluster A/P setup that back into a SAN Storage, but that would be expensive.

      What I would suggest is to have a Standby Server to have incase your disk issues crop up again
      The stand-by recovery server method involves keeping one or more extra server computers held in reserve for use as a recovery server in the event a disaster occurs.

      A stand-by recovery server has exactly the same hardware, firmware updates (such as BIOS updates), software updates (such as Windows 2000 updates), hardware configuration, applications (such as antivirus applications, administrative software, and so on), and disk partitioning as the Exchange 2000 servers it is designed to replace. A stand-by recovery server should also have Windows 2000 installed, a temporary computer name assigned, and it should be a member of a workgroup instead of a domain.

      Check this out it may give you more options that I could explain here.

      http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro.../disrec00.mspx

      HTH
      gaaq

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