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  • Stand alone e-mail server

    Hello: I am new to exchange server. Inherited the job of maintaining our SBS 2003 system. We are currently using web hosted e-mail but the company wants to set up exchange as a stand-alone e-mail server so we can host our own e-mail. Can someone point me in the right direction as to where I can find documentation/manuals on this. Thanks in advance

  • #2
    Re: Stand alone e-mail server

    SBS 2003 comes with Exchange and you can install it on the server as part of the normal add/remove.
    Could you describe a bit more about what you mean by stand alone though? Do you not want it part of your SBS domain?
    cheers
    Andy

    Please read this before you post:


    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

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    • #3
      Re: Stand alone e-mail server

      strtline, i spent the bette rpart of this year working on our exchange server to understand how to do this.

      best thing ican sugegst would be to read through some of the mspress exchange 2003 books, then setup your exchange server correctly.
      run some rbl tests, ensur you have imf enabled and anti-spam engines.

      then change your mx records to point to your new server.
      ensure you have port 25 open on your firewall directing to the server

      that's a basic guideline..
      Please do show your appreciation to those who assist you by leaving Rep Point https://www.petri.com/forums/core/im.../icon_beer.gif

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      • #4
        Re: Stand alone e-mail server

        Maybe stand-alone is not the best choice of words. Currently the company is using a web host to host our e-mail. We understand that we can setup exchange s that we can host our own e-mail and not require outside e-mail hosting. This is what I am trying to configure. Thanks

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        • #5
          Re: Stand alone e-mail server

          Hi,
          Here is what Google returns: http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en...SBS+2003&meta=

          Any of those good?
          Caesar's cipher - 3

          ZKHQ BRX HYHQWXDOOB GHFLSKHU WKLV BRX ZLOO UHDOLVH LW ZDV D ZDVWH RI WLPH!

          SFX JNRS FC U6 MNGR

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          • #6
            Re: Stand alone e-mail server

            If the current hosted solution works, I'd be tempted to leave it as it is, unless it is more cost effective to bring it in-house. Having it in-house will lesve to an initial added expense over and above what they pay now.

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            • #7
              Re: Stand alone e-mail server

              Originally posted by Strtline View Post
              Maybe stand-alone is not the best choice of words. Currently the company is using a web host to host our e-mail. We understand that we can setup exchange s that we can host our own e-mail and not require outside e-mail hosting. This is what I am trying to configure. Thanks
              You have 2 choices, both still require some sort of ISP involvement though. Option 1 is leave things as they are at the web host and use the SVS POP Connector to pull the messages into Exchange, and taking responsibilty for delivering the messages yourself and also gaining the features of Exchange like calendars etc.

              Option 2 is to take everything yourself, leaving an ISP or Web Host to look after your MX Records but email being delivered directly to your server. This is better and probably cheaper too as you won't be paying for mailbox hosting, but probably more work to setup.
              BSc, MCSA: Server 2008, MCSE, MCSA: Messaging, MCTS
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              Cruachan's Blog

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              • #8
                Re: Stand alone e-mail server

                Thanks for the replies but none have actually answered my question. I understand that we would need to setup the MX record at our web host to point to your server. My problem is where to go from there. I can make the needed changes at the web host but don't know what changes need be made to exchange server. Any articles, documentation, or additional help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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                • #9
                  Re: Stand alone e-mail server

                  You need to set the Exchange server as authoritative for your external domain that the MX record is for, setup a recipient policy and create the appropriate mailboxes/contacts etc.

                  It's difficult to know the stage that the setup is at now seeing that you are new to it. e.g. Was Exchange being used before, has it been installed in the correcy way, are all the updates currently installed etc.

                  This is worth a look.

                  http://www.msexchange.org/tutorials/...g-SBS2003.html

                  How many email adresses will there be?

                  Will some staff require access to each others emails? e.g. PAs

                  Will you be migrating the current emails to Exchange?

                  I take it that it is Exchange 2003? Have they upgraded it.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Stand alone e-mail server

                    Originally posted by Strtline View Post
                    Thanks for the replies but none have actually answered my question. I understand that we would need to setup the MX record at our web host to point to your server. My problem is where to go from there. I can make the needed changes at the web host but don't know what changes need be made to exchange server. Any articles, documentation, or additional help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
                    strline:

                    Articles and documents:
                    Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Administrator's companion. MSPRESS. Walter J Glenn and Bill English.

                    This is what I read prior to messing with ours.. then I got to just play around a bit.. and started finding alot of my answers where here on petri, however - i found they wree here by searching for specific answers to questions, or how to perform a given task, not wholesale "how do i make it all work"


                    If you'd like to tell me exactly where you are up to now, I'll try and help you along a bit, but you'll need to ask for assistance on specific things.
                    For instance.. i could tell you how to setup journalling of all inbound and outbound mail, but that's not much good to you right now...
                    Please do show your appreciation to those who assist you by leaving Rep Point https://www.petri.com/forums/core/im.../icon_beer.gif

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                    • #11
                      Re: Stand alone e-mail server

                      Hello and thanks to all that have replied. As I read the replies it is becoming apparent to me that I probably don't know enough about exchange to formulate my question properly. That being said, I will do my best to explain. We currently are using SBS 2003. We have 20 users, each has a exchange mailbox. The company currently uses Dreamhost for our web and e-mail hosting. We use the Exchange SMTP connector and the POP3 connector. We also use Outlook 2003. Although this works fine, for whatever reason management has they want to do away with the web hosted e-mail. We have a static IP address. From my research I have, hopefully correctly, concluded that I would need to change the MX record at the web host to point to our server. I did this but, once done, we could neither send or receive e-mail. Obviously, there is more that needs to be done. Although I by no means consider myself a expert on exchange, I have played around with it enough setting up our current web hosted SMTP/POP3 e-mail to feel comfortable with the setting. I have purchased a few books on exchange but non seem to address my issue. I can only assume that once the MX record is set up at the web host I need to make some setting changes to exchange to use SMTP for both incoming and outgoing e-mail. As I said, have researched this, purchased books, and so far none have addressed this. Most articles I find on the internet addrssing setting up exchange using a smart host. This is how we are currently set up. Hope this helps. Thanks again.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Stand alone e-mail server

                        IMHO use the wizards in SBS and get external email from your server working, then change the MX records, open Port 25 in your firewall and incoming should work

                        Check your ISP doesnt do anything nasty like block SMTP traffic
                        Tom Jones
                        MCT, MCSE (2000:Security & 2003), MCSA:Security & Messaging, MCDBA, MCDST, MCITP(EA, EMA, SA, EDA, ES, CS), MCTS, MCP, Sec+
                        PhD, MSc, FIAP, MIITT
                        IT Trainer / Consultant
                        Ossian Ltd
                        Scotland

                        ** Remember to give credit where credit is due and leave reputation points where appropriate **

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                        • #13
                          Re: Stand alone e-mail server

                          I just saw this while doing some research of my own, you may have fixed this on your own, but if not I hope I'm not too late to help.

                          I'm relatively new and probably can't help you top to bottom, but because I did this only a couple of years ago myself, I think I can see what you are trying to say and try to explain it in a way that will make sense where you're at.

                          Your situation: You use SBS 2003 and have an MX record with your ISP. You point the MX record at your IP address (a public firewall address, I'm assuming) and no mail gets delivered to your server. You feel as if Exchange is missing something in the configuration.

                          My situation: I have not used SBS before. I have Exchange 2003 SP2 on Windows Server 2003 SP2. I have a gateway firewall separating the internet from the private network my Exchange server is on, and odds are good that you do as well.

                          This might be a simple fix, if you've told us enough, and I think you have. Exchange should be able to do it all with SMTP; mail sent outbound from your server out through the firewall generally isn't the issue, at least it wasn't for me. There was just a small bit to do with Exchange itself to get it talking to the outside world both ways; it worked almost out of the box once I had the rest of my network set up correctly. It's mail delivered inbound to the server that poses the biggest challenge.

                          Assuming your e-mail clients aren't still trying to use the old server (sounds like they could be, if you can't send?), to me it just sounds like you are missing the "pipe" between your firewall and your SBS 2003.

                          If this is the case:

                          1) Make sure to configure Exchange to accept mail for your public domain name, if it's different from the domain name you gave the server on the private network. There's some registry modification to do or something; DanielP has a tool for this if I remember. Example: My server is server.local in the private network, but publically it is mail.ourdomain.com. I modify the server settings to also take delivery for mail.ourdomain.com, even though that's not the name the server knows itself by. In fact, Exchange has had the server.local entry removed from the organization, and the Exchange software believes it and all its addresses belong to ourdomain.com.

                          2) Here is the part I think could be missing, specifically. Log into your firewall, and unblock port 25... BUT, also create a rule forwarding that port to your server's private IP address. Example: All firewalls have a public side IP and a private side IP. My firewall may be 100.1.10.20 to the outside world, but my Exchange server is on the private side, where the addresses are in a range like 192.168.0.0/255. Pretend the server's private static IP is 192.168.0.9. I open port 25 on my gateway / firewall, and forward it to 192.168.0.9. Otherwise the mail doesn't know where it's going after it reaches your network's gateway... it doesn't make the last little hop to the server.

                          3) Now change your MX record. Using the example above, you would change your public DNS or "zone file". First, you create an "A" (or "address") record, saying that your firewall's public-side IP (the only one the world will know) is the address of your domain. Basically, to use past examples, it says that 100.1.10.20 is the IP address of yourdomain.com. Second, create the MX record itself. Example: Remember how I said I'd configured Exchange to accept mail for mail.mydomain.com? Well, "mail" is the public name of my server, in front of the domain name. So if you call your server "mail", then your MX record will basically have to say, "mail.yourdomain.com takes delivery of e-mail for yourdomain.com".

                          So, beginning to end, the pipeline for mail to your server from the internet works like this--

                          Someone sends an e-mail to [email protected]. The sending server consults your ISP's DNS, and finds out that yourdomain.com is at 100.1.10.20 and that mail.yourdomain.com will take delivery of the message at that address. So it sends the message data to your firewall at that public static IP address. Your firewall is configured to let the data in, and then pass it to your server's private 192.168.0.9 address. The message data itself is read by your server and says, "hey, this message is going to mail.yourdomain.com, are you 'mail'?" Your server says "yes I am, I'll take that," and then finds the mailbox for [email protected]. Delivery is complete, and if the client is connecting to your server, they will see the message.

                          I know this is detailed, but hopefully it clears up any ambiguity!

                          Good luck,
                          Rprov

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