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  • Exchange redundancy

    Hi guys

    Looking to build some redundancy into our network, which at present include exchange 2003.

    We are planning to move building next year so seems an ideal time to implement some great changes.

    I've heard 2003 clustering is pretty complex and not for the faint hearted.

    Apps like "Double take".

    I also heard exchange 2007 makes things easier on this front.

    Any experience / comments on this?

    Ideally the most cost effective / easiest solution (Ha, is there such a thing in IT?).

    Last edited by ethos; 25th November 2008, 16:04.

  • #2
    Re: Exchange redundancy

    I've used DT before and found it good.
    Ex2007 is also good but would involve costs and upgrades to your network.
    How many users and what is your current setup?
    Why not get costs from your supplier for both?
    cheers
    Andy

    Please read this before you post:


    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

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    • #3
      Re: Exchange redundancy

      Originally posted by AndyJG247 View Post
      I've used DT before and found it good.
      Ex2007 is also good but would involve costs and upgrades to your network.
      How many users and what is your current setup?
      Why not get costs from your supplier for both?
      Currently only around 100 users, shouldn't expand a massive deal.

      We have 1 exchange server at the moment. I was really just looking into more info on the best solution to read up on. Then nearer the time I will choose which one is best.

      Might be possible to upgrade to exchange 2007, but again- only if it's worth it

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      • #4
        Re: Exchange redundancy

        To go to Exchange 2007 with the redundancy you need to consider the costs of the additional hardware and the licences.

        However, if you are doing this yourself (ie the business has not approached you to do it) then you need to go away and ask some questions.

        Question 1: Do you actually need it? You can't answer this, only the business can. Very few businesses actually need live fail over.

        Remember the rule. The longer you can be without email the cheaper it is.

        If someone says that you do need live fail over, then the next question is what do you do during a power cut? If the answer is nothing, then you don't need live fail over. If on the other hand you have a generator in the car park the size of a small van, then live fail over is something that probably needs to be considered.

        Question 2: Cost of downtime per hour. That isn't just your downtime, but to the business. This will give you an idea of what will be saved.

        Question 3: How long can the business survive without email. This is also answered by the power cut question. If it is an hour, or two, then live fail over is a waste of time and money.

        Question 4: What are you planning for? Hardware failure? Theft of the hardware, flood, fire, hurricane? What I plan to do with a company in central London is different to someone in the middle of nowhere, where you can see someone coming from three miles away and the neighbours go baaaaa.

        Look at this as part of the BUSINESS CONTINUITY, not IT on its own.

        If you are planning for hardware failure, then holding spare parts can be just as cost effective.
        At a previous client we used the same core chassis for everything. The idea was that if a critical server failed then the other servers could be raided for parts while waiting for Dell/HP/IBM to turn up. When the machines got to end of life, again part raiding would allow the machines to continue to operate longer.

        What about other points of failure? Network switch for example?
        Domain controllers, Internet connection failure?

        Simon.
        --
        Simon Butler
        Exchange MVP

        Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
        More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
        Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
        In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

        Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

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        • #5
          Re: Exchange redundancy

          Thanks for the information, plenty to think about there
          Last edited by ethos; 9th February 2009, 11:51.

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