Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ever hear of an inactive MX record?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ever hear of an inactive MX record?

    I am looking for opinions or comments.

    Last Monday I asked the ISP to create an MX record mail.mydomain.com. The ISP hosts the DNS for mydomain.com.

    I could ping mail.mydomain.com and my mail.mydomain.com resolved to the mail server IP address.

    SMTP e-mail was not getting delivered to the Exchange server. After exhausting all possibilities, I called Microsoft and they diagnosed the problem as 'no MX record' for the domain. They used mxtoolbox.com and I confirmed this.

    There was a lot of time and money lost as a result of this and I am certian the ISP created an A-host record and not an MX record in error. This is the only way mail.mydomain.com would have resolved to the server IP address.

    When I contacted the ISP today, the probelm was fixed. They told me the MX record was created but for some reason it was 'inactive'. They said they deleted the MX record and recreated it.

    I have never heard of an inactive MX record in Windows Server DNS. Also, if the MX record was inactive as they tried to tell me, why did it resolve to the correct address and why was I able to make a remote desktop connection to mail.mydomain.com?

    SMTP e-mail looks for an MX record to route e-mail, not an IP address so I am certain they created just an A-host record in error and are now trying to cover their tracks not knowing that I had already used mail.mydomain.com for remote desktop and other testing methods outside of SMTP routing.

    Opinions? Are they stringing me a line to cover their tracks?
    Last edited by RobW; 29th September 2008, 22:06.
    Network Engineers do IT under the desk

  • #2
    Re: Ever hear of an inactive MX record?

    Ya sounds like they messed up, I never heard of an "inactive" mx record. It could be an their internal method but either its there or not.

    You need an A and MX for email to work anyway, they just did half.
    "...if I turn out to be particularly clear, you've probably misunderstood what I've said” - Alan Greenspan

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Ever hear of an inactive MX record?

      Yeah, there's no such thing as an inactive DNS record, MX or otherwise. The A record for the mail server resolved correctly, but email servers will look up the MX record for the domain and then look up the A record for the domain in order to send email (they will look for a domain A record if they don't find an MX record). That being said, the only way email would have gotten to you is if the domain A record and the email server A record pointed to the same ip address (which doesn't appear to be the case). So at the end of the day I'd say they created an A record for the email server (which was different from the domain A record) and didn't set up an MX record and so email could not be delivered. They're giving you a snow job and assuming you are a non DNS literate user.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Ever hear of an inactive MX record?

        This is a bit too late, but you could have used nslookup to see if there were any MX records associated with your domain. In Windows just give nslookup the command 'set type=all' and then lookup your top level domain name and see what you can see.
        Wesley David
        LinkedIn | Careers 2.0
        -------------------------------
        Microsoft Certifications: MCSE 2003 | MCSA:Messaging 2003 | MCITP:EA, SA, EST | MCTS: a'plenty | MCDST
        Vendor Neutral Certifications: CWNA
        Blog: www.TheNubbyAdmin.com || Twitter: @Nonapeptide || GTalk, Reader and Google+: [email protected] || Skype: Wesley.Nonapeptide
        Goofy kitten avatar photo from Troy Snow: flickr.com/photos/troysnow/

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Ever hear of an inactive MX record?

          Originally posted by Nonapeptide View Post
          This is a bit too late, but you could have used nslookup to see if there were any MX records associated with your domain. In Windows just give nslookup the command 'set type=all' and then lookup your top level domain name and see what you can see.
          I could have gone to mxtoolbox.com too but I didn't. I relied on the expertise of the ISP and was sent an e-mail confirmation that the MX record had been created.
          Network Engineers do IT under the desk

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Ever hear of an inactive MX record?

            Rule #1 when dealing with ISPs.

            They lie.

            As long as you remember that, then life is good.
            If they say that they have done something, presume that they haven't. Never trust an ISP to tell you the truth.
            What probably happened is that they made a mistake, didn't notice then checked when you complained and fixed the problem, hoping you wouldn't notice.

            If I have to ask an ISP to make any DNS records then I move the domain to another service where I have control (web control panel etc). This is not 1997, domain name registrars are very common, very cheap and most of them do a good job. Use the ISP for access, get everything else off them.

            Simon.
            --
            Simon Butler
            Exchange MVP

            Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
            More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
            Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
            In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

            Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Ever hear of an inactive MX record?

              I agree, I always assume that the ISP: 1. Thinks I don't know anything about DNS and 2. Doesn't do what they're asked to do and then makes up a story based on their presumption from rule 1. I prefer to use DNS management tools myself (which are often provided by the registrar) when and where ever I can.

              Comment

              Working...
              X