Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Migrating Mailboxes - Exchange 2000 to 2003

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Migrating Mailboxes - Exchange 2000 to 2003

    I have two Exchange Servers on a lan.

    1. Exchange Server 2000 - 60 mailboxes active and working
    2. Exchange Server 2003 Enterprise Edition - no mailboxes (users) on that server yet.

    Both servers (Windows 2000 and Windows 2003) are member servers of the same domain. Windows 2000 - mail.xyz.local - Windows 2003 ex.xyz.local

    I would like to gradually move users' mailboxes from the first server (2000) to the second (2003) rather than doing this all at once, i.e., 5 or 10 at a time. This means, of course, that e-mail that comes into the network and which is delivered to the 2000 Server via a port forward must go through the 2000 Server first.

    If I have moved [email protected]'s mailbox from the 2000 Server to 2003 Server how will e-mail 'know' it is to be delivered to the 2003 Server? I've been researching this and apparently a 'front-end' server can be set up to do this. I'm looking for a simple temporary solution that does not require additional hardware.

    Summary:

    1. E-mail to [email protected] comes into the network. It is sent to the 2000 Server.
    2. The 2000 Server sees that [email protected] is not on that server.
    3. The 2000 Server sends the e-mail out to the 2003 Server. Joe's mailbox is there.
    4. The mail is delivered.

    Is this possible? What's the way to do this? Does this involve creating a 'routing group' which, I understand, is used for purpose of replicating AD information, yes?

    Thank you for your help.

    Mike

  • #2
    Re: Migrating Mailboxes - Exchange 2000 to 2003

    Have you read this article:

    http://www.amset.info/exchange/migration.asp

    Very Very good!
    What do I know, I am only 26.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Migrating Mailboxes - Exchange 2000 to 2003

      Yes, I read that, thank you. But I'm not sure it's an approach to staggering the migration, i.e., five today, five tomorrow, etc.

      Thank you.

      Mike

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Migrating Mailboxes - Exchange 2000 to 2003

        That guide is mine.
        Why do you think it is not suitable?

        You can have your mailboxes on any server in the Exchange org.
        Simply ensure that you have replicated all of the system and public folders before you move any mailboxes.

        Once email hits the Exchange server Exchange will deal with the routing of the email to the correct server. Exchange also deals with the updating of the Outlook client to point to the new server as well.

        The only point you need a frontend server is if you want to provide OWA access. Otherwise both the old and the new server have to be exposed to the internet, on unique URLs and IP addresses AND the users have to know which address to use, as the auto redirect will not work - because it will redirect to the internal address of the other server which will almost certainly not resolve on the internet.

        Simon.
        --
        Simon Butler
        Exchange MVP

        Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
        More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
        Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
        In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

        Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Migrating Mailboxes - Exchange 2000 to 2003

          Originally posted by Sembee View Post
          That guide is mine.
          Why do you think it is not suitable?

          You can have your mailboxes on any server in the Exchange org.
          Simply ensure that you have replicated all of the system and public folders before you move any mailboxes.

          Once email hits the Exchange server Exchange will deal with the routing of the email to the correct server. Exchange also deals with the updating of the Outlook client to point to the new server as well.

          The only point you need a frontend server is if you want to provide OWA access. Otherwise both the old and the new server have to be exposed to the internet, on unique URLs and IP addresses AND the users have to know which address to use, as the auto redirect will not work - because it will redirect to the internal address of the other server which will almost certainly not resolve on the internet.

          Simon.
          Well, I'm sorry. Maybe I just didn't understand all the steps. First, in my case, workstations are not domain members so I don't think that the update of their Outlook profiles will be automatic.

          "Configure the public folders on the replication tab in ESM so that both servers are listed. Use the Propagate settings where appropriate to send the replication setting to the sub folders."

          I've never done the above. I'm not familiar with the principle of replication.

          I know it's simple for you. I bet you've done this a couple of dozen times. For me, well, I've got the heeby jeebies about some of these steps.

          You ever do side jobs? Something like this is not something I'd be likely to try without some previous experience.

          Thanks.

          Mike

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Migrating Mailboxes - Exchange 2000 to 2003

            A couple of dozen? I do the process two or three times a month - I am an Exchange contractor. Unfortunately I only work in the UK due to insurance and legal reasons, so I would be unable to assist you directly.

            The guide is aimed at someone who knows how to configure certain steps within Exchange. It is not a how to - I don't write those as there are lots of books and articles on the process already. Microsoft Technet is fully of them. This is the basic steps on adding a server to the list of replicas: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/l...EXCHG.65).aspx
            However by using ESM you can add the server to all of the folders in one hit.

            The fact that your machines are not members of the domain shouldn't matter. Outlook still has to connect to the domain for authentication and mailbox information, so should redirect automatically. The information is still stored in the domain and is still queried by the client. It isn't a Windows thing, but an Outlook/Exchange thing.

            Simon.
            --
            Simon Butler
            Exchange MVP

            Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
            More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
            Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
            In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

            Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

            Comment

            Working...
            X