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  • Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

    I want to start learning about exchange 2003 (amongst other things ) and after the very impressive free trial video from Trainsignal
    think it will be well worth the investment. My work are going to be implementing 2003 in the new year, so want to start looking in to it myself.

    I have an actionpack and a spare P3 machine, so was hoping to setup Exchange and use a domain regsitered with Fasthosts purely for learning.

    It is typical, because my old ISP gave a static as standard. I have recently changed and my new provider wants an additional 5 per month for a static!

    I did a Google
    and was hoping for any input from this great forum about using exchange with a dynamic IP via DynDNS

    Simon

  • #2
    Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

    Simon, there is (are) some threads here about using DynDNS. I will have a search later and see if I can find them for you. It can be done.

    [Edited after RobWs post]

    http://forums.petri.com/showthread.p...ghlight=dyndns
    http://forums.petri.com/showthread.p...ghlight=dyndns

    If this setup is for a business, then it is well worth spending the 60lbs per year and get a Static IP. It will save a lot of haslles when you have to troubleshoot problems.

    When you do install Echange at work, put the Train Signal CD onto your laptop and take it with you. It is an excellent reference to have with you when you come to a sticky part. Are you going to setup OWA or even RPC/HTTP(S)? Are you putting Exchange onto its own server? Are you looking at a single server or a FE/BE (Front End/Back End) solution?

    How many users do you have at your work? SBS may be a viable option so long as you will have less than 75 users. You may find it is cheaper to install SBS than to purchase Exchange 2003 Standard.
    Last edited by biggles77; 24th December 2006, 15:06.
    1 1 was a racehorse.
    2 2 was 1 2.
    1 1 1 1 race 1 day,
    2 2 1 1 2

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    • #3
      Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

      Make sure your ISP does not block port 25 (SMTP). Most residential ISPs block this port to control spam (and abuse) forcing you to use their SMTP service. All ingoing/outgoing e-mail is on port 25.

      If it is anything like where I live, you have to go to a business-class Internet service where all the ports are open. This is usually $50 more per month.

      If your ISP blocks that port to outsiders, you will have to set up a smarthost in Exchange and send all your outgoing e-mail to their SMTP server.

      You will have to use a utility like SmartPopToExchange to use POP3 to pull your e-mail from your ISP to your Exchange store.

      If you have a static IP, why would you want to use a dynamic DNS service? If you register a domain, whoever is hosting the DNS for the domain has to created you an MX record (i.e. mail.mydomain.com) and this record has to resolve to an IP address, not a DNS host.
      Network Engineers do IT under the desk

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      • #4
        Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

        Thanks for your replies.

        Biggles77 - Links appreciated. I did do a quick skim through the forum but completely missed these!

        RobW- My ISP can't be blocking Port 25 thankfully - I use fastmail's SMTP server's via my e-mail client from my home. I have a dynamic IP - i mentioned that I had a static previously.

        Thanks again.

        Simon

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        • #5
          Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

          Biggles77,

          Just read your edited post, thank you.

          This exercise is for my home test lab which has a dynamic IP; I believe we have 4 Static's at work.

          We use a local IT company for Installs and 3rd line support.

          Although we only have about 50 users (with 10 printers), we went for 2003 Standard to cover expantion (i believe SBS is 75 connections i.e machines or printers) and plan to use a CRM package not too far in the distant future which I believe needs it's own MS SQL server and will not work with SBS from memory - Exchange will also have it's own dedicated server.

          I believe the idea is to put Exchange in the DMZ area for OWA for field based satff, whilst office members will use Office Outlook on their desktop's.

          Thanks for your reply.

          Simon

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

            There is a lot of fud about putting Exchange in a DMZ.
            Basically - it is a bad idea. The number of ports that you have to open to get a domain member to work in a DMZ basically makes the firewall swiss cheese and therefore reduces your security.

            You can operate Exchange with just two ports open to the internet - 25 for SMTP and 443 for https. No other ports are required.

            The fact that you can connect to your hosts SMTP server does not mean that you can use Exchange and that SMTP is not blocked. That is testing port 25 for outbound, whereas to run Exchange you need port 25 inbound.

            Otherwise running Exchange on a dynamic IP address is quite simple - I did it for two years until I switched ISPs.
            The only problem with a dynamic IP is that many sites will not accept your email being delivered directly (AOL for one) so you will need to use an SMTP Connector to bounce the messages through an SMTP server. I tend to use the ISPs SMTP server.

            Simon.
            --
            Simon Butler
            Exchange MVP

            Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
            More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
            Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
            In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

            Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

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            • #7
              Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

              Simon,

              Thanks for reply.

              Originally posted by Sembee View Post
              There is a lot of fud about putting Exchange in a DMZ.
              Basically - it is a bad idea. The number of ports that you have to open to get a domain member to work in a DMZ basically makes the firewall swiss cheese and therefore reduces your security.

              I did read this somewhere before, but never really looked in to it. I also thought our IT company knew better, but this isn't the first thing it appears hasn't been done correctly.

              You can operate Exchange with just two ports open to the internet - 25 for SMTP and 443 for https. No other ports are required.

              The fact that you can connect to your hosts SMTP server does not mean that you can use Exchange and that SMTP is not blocked. That is testing port 25 for outbound, whereas to run Exchange you need port 25 inbound.

              I see. I have just forwarded Port 25 on my Zyxel gateway, knocked the firewall off on my laptop (for testing) and gone to the Shieldsup website and it is showing port 25 as open.

              Otherwise running Exchange on a dynamic IP address is quite simple - I did it for two years until I switched ISPs.
              The only problem with a dynamic IP is that many sites will not accept your email being delivered directly (AOL for one) so you will need to use an SMTP Connector to bounce the messages through an SMTP server. I tend to use the ISPs SMTP server.

              Ah, that is a good point. Is this because a Dynamic means there is more chance of an e-mail being spam?

              Simon.
              Thank you for your help.

              Merry Christmas

              Simon
              Last edited by simonsays; 25th December 2006, 03:12.

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              • #8
                Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

                The simple fact that a number of blacklists operate on is that if you are on a dynamic IP address you shouldn't be running an email server.

                By blocking email from dynamic IP addresses, which are used by residential users, you can stop a significant amount of spam coming from compromised home user machines.

                Simon.
                --
                Simon Butler
                Exchange MVP

                Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
                More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
                Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
                In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

                Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

                  Simon,

                  That is fair enough - i think I will set Exchange up for the sake of learning and when my 12 month agreement runs out with my current ISP (few months) swop to one that gives you a static as standard for the same price and doesn't block the ports!

                  I know you can get a fair bit of info from dnsinfo.org, but is there a register of IP's out in the field and whether they are dynamically assigned or not? Or is there something in the TCP suite that displays this?

                  Simon

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

                    The lists of dynamic IP addresses are shared between the blacklists quite readily. I have never seen them actually available for public viewing though.

                    If the address is not static, or you are using a residential connection (ie it is cheap compared to the business service) then I would presume that it was dynamic.
                    I had a residential connection at home for two years until the business was doing well enough to afford a business connection. I now pay roughly double the cheapest home type connection, but I can run servers on the connection.

                    Simon.
                    --
                    Simon Butler
                    Exchange MVP

                    Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
                    More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
                    Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
                    In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

                    Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

                      Originally posted by Sembee View Post
                      The lists of dynamic IP addresses are shared between the blacklists quite readily. I have never seen them actually available for public viewing though.

                      I see - makes sense.

                      If the address is not static, or you are using a residential connection (ie it is cheap compared to the business service) then I would presume that it was dynamic.
                      I had a residential connection at home for two years until the business was doing well enough to afford a business connection. I now pay roughly double the cheapest home type connection, but I can run servers on the connection.


                      It seems the static IP really depends on the ISP; some providers do not state in their T&C's if you will have a static IP, although they do. Others use dynamic unless they want to watch your bandwidth and give you a static!
                      Is your *new* DSL line (?) a low contention, Non NAT block account?
                      I requested a block from my old ISP and although they said to use NAT at first, they did give me 4 static's (not useable - mask of x.x.x.252) on a home premier account!

                      My current ISP wants a lot more money for this type of service and I can't really justify it at the moment.


                      Simon.
                      Thanks,

                      Simon
                      Last edited by simonsays; 27th December 2006, 02:11.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

                        Why I signed up for my current ISP, I was able to request a static IP address.
                        Here in the UK, I find that most DSL connections fall in to three rough groups.

                        - the cheapest group is for residential connections. Dynamic IP address, sometimes restricted on what you can do with the link, poor contention ratio etc. Basically good for browsing. The sort of thing my parents would have at home.

                        - high end residential. Dynamic IP address with an option of a static address. Less restrictions, better contention ratio etc.

                        - business service. Multiple static IP addresses available, almost no restrictions on what you can do with the service, good contention ratio etc.

                        I am on a business class service, which suits me fine.

                        I find that trying to compare ISP services internationally is very difficult. Just look at what they have in Japan or on Continental Europe. Speeds and connections that just make everyone else drool.

                        Simon.
                        --
                        Simon Butler
                        Exchange MVP

                        Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
                        More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
                        Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
                        In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

                        Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Running Exchange on a dynamic IP

                          Thankfully, *broadband* is more competitive than when it first raised it's head.

                          Although I am on a vanilla home connection, I cannot complain about speed, bottlenecks or being capped for 19 a month. Down is around 5MB p/s and upload a miserable 448 kbps due to the good old copper structure!

                          The company does offer Business options including non NAT'd blocks although I can't really justify double pricing at the moment.

                          A colleague recently went to Europe and said that it is all Fibre with impressive up/down speeds.

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