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  • Licensing

    Hi folks,

    I understand that when I get additional Exchange licenses that I get a Outlook cal also - that's cool. But does anyone know the answers to these questions as looking on Microsofts site I left more confused than I entered.

    - If I get a user cal for Exchange - do I also need to get a cal for the DC for the Active Directory usage? - the user does not access anything other than email.

    - Do users who only use Exchange for pop3 need a cal vs those users that use the store?

    - How do I tell how many licenses are installed on exchange?

    Thank you in advance.

  • #2
    Re: Licensing

    Exchange licensing is done on the honour system. There is no hard enforced system on the server for CALs. As such there is no mechanism to tell how many licenses you own - you should "know" that. In the event of an audit you will be required to produce the proof of licenses, so if you cannot find them then you are in the eyes of the law, unlicensed.

    The only system that can enforce a user limit is the license logging service. This is generally recorded as a waste of space and most people turn it off. If you look at it you will find that you can enter whatever number you like - there is no control over that number via license keys (unlike terminal server licensing).

    As far as Microsoft are concerned, everyone who is accessing Exchange needs a CAL - OWA, POP3, IMAP, RPC over HTTPS etc. The CAL includes a license for Outlook (2003 on the current version of Exchange) but you don't have to use it.

    You also need a Windows CAL for each user, whether this is licensed on a per seat or per server basis. Most sites license on a per seat and make it number of staff = number of CALs.

    The above reply does NOT apply to SBS version of Exchange, which is hard enforced to 75 users.

    Simon.
    --
    Simon Butler
    Exchange MVP

    Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
    More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
    Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
    In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

    Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Licensing

      You also need a Windows CAL for each user, whether this is licensed on a per seat or per server basis. Most sites license on a per seat and make it number of staff = number of CALs.
      really? so even if a user is only using exchange the AD server needs a cal also? What do hosting providers for exchange do?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Licensing

        Hosted Exchange runs under a different licensing scheme for hosters.

        As far as Microsoft are concerned, if you are accessing the server then you need to have a Windows CAL.

        Simon.
        --
        Simon Butler
        Exchange MVP

        Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
        More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
        Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
        In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

        Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Licensing

          thanks

          it just makes no sense at all.

          Fail to see why they purposefully make it so confusing - open source looks better and better just due to this reason.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Licensing

            Why doesn't it make sense?
            You are accessing the server - so that requires a CAL.
            You are then accessing a product on the server - that also requires a CAL.
            That isn't just the case with Exchange, SQL is licensed in the same way.

            For most companies it isn't an issue, they just get one server CAL for every member of staff and license it per seat. Then you don't have to worry about the server side.

            Hosting has unique requirements, and Microsoft have changed their licensing structure to fit. Hosters have to pay monthly if I recall correctly.

            Open Source may appear to be more appealing, but the open source community is struggling to produce anything that comes close to Exchange.
            If you just want a POP3 server then you are spoilt for choice - but Exchange is more than just a POP3 server.

            Simon.
            Last edited by Sembee; 28th October 2006, 00:39.
            --
            Simon Butler
            Exchange MVP

            Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
            More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
            Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
            In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

            Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Licensing

              It doesn't make sense due to the way they structure their licenses.

              Need a cal for Exchange - ok, need a cal if you access a server - ok. but need a cal for exchange & a server that runs DC even if you do not access that server - only for the AD authentication - what on earth for. It makes zero sense.

              And it is needlessly confusing. If it wasn't they wouldn't have an entire web section devoted to it, nor would they have made more than 30 e-learning classes devoted to software assurance. And there certainly wouldn't be Microsoft Certification exams just on licensing. From posts i'm reading if you talk to 10 different licensing people - you'll get 10 different requirements.

              If that's not confusing - what is?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Licensing

                Granted the different licensing schemes that Microsoft offer are confusing, but that comes down to the way that the market works.

                The type of licensing acceptable to a 10 user site that doesn't change isn't going to be acceptable to someone like Motorola, or GE.
                Then you get the different needs - some people want to pay once and that is that, some want to pay and be eligible for upgrades, others need flexibility. I have many of my smaller but growing clients on Open Subscription because that provides them with some stability in their licensing.

                You have to purchase a CAL for the Active Directory server. You need a CAL to access the Windows part of the Exchange server (the Windows CAL), and a CAL to access the Exchange server (Exchange CAL).
                Licensed correctly the Windows CAL will cover all of your servers.

                I have three simple rules for Microsoft licensing.

                1. Get three different opinions, including one from Microsoft.
                2. Get in writing - it is pointless unless it is in writing.
                3. The most expensive option is often the "correct" option.

                For most clients I tell them number of staff = number of CALs (Windows and/or Exchange). It is only when the staff use of computers (shifts, lots of staff sharing a computer etc) which is when things get complicated.

                It isn't just Microsoft that has this problem. The licensing for other Enterprise level applications is just as bad. Microsoft may it more so by offering more options.

                Simon.
                --
                Simon Butler
                Exchange MVP

                Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
                More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
                Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
                In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

                Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Licensing

                  Thank you for your persistance - and pardon my frustration level. I spent hours researching it before getting to this forum and posting. and I'm no closer to understanding it now than I was this morning.

                  you say

                  You have to purchase a CAL for the Active Directory server. You need a CAL to access the Windows part of the Exchange server (the Windows CAL), and a CAL to access the Exchange server (Exchange CAL).
                  Licensed correctly the Windows CAL will cover all of your servers.
                  Part of my problem is i'm adding onto an existing infrastructure. We run SBS2000 and have for a few years. We also host some websites for partners of our company for convenience sake.

                  Now I'm needing to add exchange server to cover a couple of companies - and will probably transition over to fully using exchange as I go. I've resisted it for years but reached the end of being able to resist it.

                  I've got the sbs2000 cal's for my domain - no problem. I dont have any problem or confusion with needing exchange cal's for them as well.

                  it's the external customers - who are not connected to the domain - are they good with just exchange cal's - or do they need an exchange cal, plus a cal for the sbs2000 server (which is the DC of course).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Licensing

                    SBS is a whole new ball game.

                    I am pretty sure that with SBS you would have to purchase an SBS CAL, (for the domain), a Windows 2003 CAL and an Exchange 2003 CAL.
                    Even if you changed up to SBS 2003 you would still have to purchase all three, as the SBS CAL only covers the SBS server, but you still need to have it. Don't forget the 75 user limit.

                    You would be better off with a transition pack, to turn your SBS licenses in to full product. Then split the the contents up. That will give you licenses that you can make per seat, plus install Exchange elsewhere.

                    Although if it was me building this site I wouldn't mix the client content and your own company content. I would build another forest and domain that is totally separate.

                    If you are going to host for other companies then you should probably speak to Microsoft about getting on to their hosting programme. This will give a different licensing structure and resources on setting up Exchange for hosting, including the address book changes etc.

                    Simon.
                    --
                    Simon Butler
                    Exchange MVP

                    Blog: http://blog.sembee.co.uk/
                    More Exchange Content: http://exchange.sembee.info/
                    Exchange Resources List: http://exbpa.com/
                    In the UK? Hire me: http://www.sembee.co.uk/

                    Sembee is a registered trademark, used here with permission.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Licensing

                      Sembee, I'd like to personally say thanks for the great info you've put into this thread!
                      Cheers,

                      Daniel Petri
                      Microsoft Most Valuable Professional - Active Directory Directory Services
                      MCSA/E, MCTS, MCITP, MCT

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